Melissa Hammerle
Office
Twilight Hall 313
Tel
(802) 443-2384
Email
mhammerle@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
Fall 2022: Wednesdays, 10:30am-1:00pm or by appointment, in person or via zoom (if you prefer).
Additional Programs
Education Studies

Melissa Hammerle is the former director of the N.Y.U. Creative Writing Program and Co-Director of The Unterberg Poetry Center in New York City.  She has for several years taught and supervised pre-service teachers in Vermont, focusing on the development of teaching competencies through contemplative, self-reflective pedagogies, social justice praxis, and creative inquiry.  She has a doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from UVM, where she completed research in contemplative education in the context of the intellectual, emotional and psychological growth of students and teachers. Her dissertation was entitled: “Conceptualizing Contemplative Practice as Pedagogy: Approaches to Mindful Inquiry in Higher Education.”

Melissa has taught methods courses for elementary and secondary teaching as well as literacy across the disciplines, the teaching process, literature and writing.  At N.Y.U. she directed literacy programs in NYC public elementary and high schools, hospitals and women’s prisons. In her teaching and her research she is interested in the connection between engaged teaching and meaningful learning and the ways in which contemplative pedagogy can provide a mechanism to deepen learning through a process of embodied inquiry in which both student and teacher are actively engaged.

Courses Taught

Course Description

Education in the USA
What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, SOC

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Course Description

Educational Psychology: Learning in Schools
In this course we will expand our understanding of learning and teaching while exploring principles, issues, and research in educational psychology. We will examine learning theories, complex cognitive processes, cognitive and emotional development, and motivation, and apply these constructs to effective instruction, the design of optimal learning environments, assessment of student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. (EDST 0115) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Educational Psychology: Learning in the Community
In this course we will expand our understanding of learning and teaching while engaging with the local school community, including professionals and stakeholders who support K-12 students in various roles. We will examine curriculum theory, teaching theories, and practices that support social-emotional as well as proficiency-based learning, trauma-informed teaching, and the use of personalized learning plans to support student growth and development. In this way, students will continue to understand and develop effective instructional practices, the design of optimal learning environments, meaningful assessment tools, and effective and engaging teaching strategies for diverse, inclusive, innovative, student-focused classrooms. (EDST 0237; Restricted to EDST Majors, and others by permission) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Senior Seminar in Education Studies
In this capstone seminar for General Education minors, students will engage, analyze, and offer solutions to real world problems in the current landscape of education. We will read extensively in the field, consider multiple research methods and approaches, and enlist community experts. Working across disciplines and collaboratively, students will create final projects that integrate and apply what they have learned in their coursework, developing and enhancing skills for creative problem solving and leadership in the field. Final projects will vary; all students will make oral presentations. (three of five required courses for the general EDST minor.) 3 hrs. Sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024

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Course Description

Mindfulness in Education: Radical, Holistic Models of Learning
What is mindfulness? And how is it useful in reframing approaches to education for engaged, critical learning? In this course we will explore the impact of contemplative practices in education, considering such questions as: what is learning and how does divergent or mindful thinking influence how we learn? For example, is there a connection between mindfulness and creativity, attention, memory? We will engage in contemplative practices to consider mindful learning from a personal perspective and review research in the fields of education and psychology that suggests a positive correlation between contemplative practices and the intellectual, emotional, and psychological growth of students.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, PHL

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Course Description

Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts
The current pandemic, and all the questions it brings to the fore about what we value in a college experience, make this an ideal moment to consider the meaning and purpose of your liberal arts education. At the heart of this exploration will be a question posed by physicist Arthur Zajonc: “How do we find our own authentic way to an undivided life where meaning and purpose are tightly interwoven with intellect and action, where compassion and care are infused with insight and knowledge?” We will examine how, at this pivotal moment of decision making, you can understand your college career as an act of “cultivating humanity” and how you can meaningfully challenge yourself to take ownership of your intellectual and personal development. Through interdisciplinary and multicultural exploration, drawing from education studies and philosophical, religious, and literary texts, we will engage our course questions by way of student-led discussion, written reflection, and personal, experiential learning practices. In this way we will examine how a liberal arts education might foster the cultivation of an ‘undivided’ life, “the good life”, a life well-lived. (The course is open to sophomores and second semester first-year students. Juniors by permission only.)

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP

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