Roberto Lint Sagarena
Office
Carr Hall 203
Tel
(802) 443-5508
Email
rlintsagarena@middlebury.edu
Office Hours
Fall 2021: by appointment

Roberto Lint Sagarena is Professor of American Studies at Middlebury College and Director of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity. He holds Bachelors degrees in Art History and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz and a Doctorate in Religion from Princeton University. His research and teaching interests center on the role of religion and religious rhetoric in the formation of racial, ethnic and regional identities in the Americas with particular attention to social relations resulting from inequality. He is the author of Aztlan and Arcadia: Religion, Ethnicity, and the Creation of Place (2014 NYU Press).

Courses Taught

Course Description

Intro to American Studies
Please refer to each section for specific course descriptions.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830
A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. Required for all majors and minors.3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, LIT, NOR

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Course Description

Introduction to Latina/o Studies
In this course we will undertake an interdisciplinary investigation of the unique experiences and conditions of U.S. Latina/os of Caribbean, Latin American, and Mexican descent. We will critically examine transnational cultures, patterns of circular migration, and intergenerational transformations from a historical perspective while also using methodologies from the humanities and social sciences. Topics will include the conquest of Mexico’s northern frontier, Chicana/o and Nuyorican movements, Latina feminist thought, Latina/o arts, Central American migrations in the 1980s, Latina/o religiosities, as well as philosophies of resistance and acculturation. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Independent Study
Select project advisor prior to registration.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Senior Work
(Approval required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Honors Thesis
For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2021, Winter 2022, Winter 2023

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Course Description

American Pulp Fiction
In this course we will consider how American pulp fiction has reflected cultural attitudes, represented categories of identity, and been regularly reimagined from the golden age of the genre in the 20th century to contemporary times. We will read stories by Jack Vance, Poul Anderson, and H.P. Lovecraft, as well as Chester Himes’ The Heat is On. We will also view Pulp Fiction, the Maltese Falcon, and Lovecraft Country.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

AMR, LIT, NOR, WTR

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Course Description

Worldbuilding
In this seminar we will critically examine fictional worlds in literature, cinema, and games. Worldbuilding synthesizes and transforms our understanding of reality into fantastic settings such as Middle-Earth, Star Wars, or even colonial exploration narratives. We will critically examine the multidisciplinary use of origin stories, symbols and myths, invented histories, and imagined geographies in constructing new universes. Among the questions we will consider are: How do we conceive of coherent places and times? What real world consequences do fictional worlds have on popular beliefs and practices? Students will design their own well-researched and richly detailed worlds during the semester. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

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Course Description

Latin American Studies Senior Thesis
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Publications

Arcadia and Aztlán: Religion, Ethnicity and the Creation of History. NYU Press, 2014.

Chapters

  1. Publications:

    Book

    • “Race” in Key Words in Material Religion, S. Brent Plate, ed. Bloomsbury Academic, 2015. pp. 167-172.

    • With David Carrasco, “The Religious Vision of Gloria Anzaldua,” in Mexican American Religions: Spirituality,

      Activism, and Culture, Gaston Espinoza and Mario Garcia eds., Duke University Press, 2008. pp. 223-241

    • “Mexican American Religion in a Comparative Perspective” in Religion and Immigration in America:

      Comparative and Historical Perspectives, Richard D. Alba and Albert J. Raboteau (Eds.), New York University

      Press, 2008. Pp. 56-70.

    • “Porous Borders: Mexican Immigration and American Civic Culture” in Faith in America, Charles Lippy ed.

      Praeger Press, 2006. pp. 129-140.

    • “Re-Building the Church: Preservation and Restoration in American Christian Practice” in Practicing

      Protestants, Laurie Maffley-Kipp, Leigh Schmidt and Mark Valeri eds., Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006.

      pp. 118-136.

    • “Building California’s Past: Mission Revival Architecture and Regional Identity” in Faith in the Market:

      Religion and Urban Commercial Culture, John Giggie and Diane Winston eds., Rutgers University Press, 2002. pp. 91- 107.

      Peer-reviewed Journal Articles
      • “Making a There There: Devotional Streetscapes in Los Angeles” in Visual Resources, May 2009.
      • “Building California’s Past: Mission Revival Architecture and Regional Identity” in Journal of Urban History,

      Vol. 28, No.4, May 2002: 429-444.

Encyclopedia Entries

• •

“The Latino/a Contribution” The Encyclopedia of American Religion, CQPress, 2010.
“Antebellum America” in the Encyclopedia of Religion and American Cultures, Gary Laderman and Luis Leon

eds., ABC-CLIO, 2003. pp. 468-470.
“Aztlán” in the Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures, Davíd Carrasco ed., Oxford University Press, 2001. (http://www.oxford-mesoamerican.com/entry?entry=t221.e35)

Book Reviews

  • Review of The Spiritual Redemption: Heritage, Power and Loss on New Mexico’s Upper Rio Grande in Journal

    of Western History, Vol.34.4, Winter 2003. p.502 -503.

  • Review of For this Land: Writings on Religion in America. By Vine Deloria Jr., Edited by James Treat. in

    Koinonia, Vol. XI.1, Spring 1999. p. 127-129.