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The Inaugural Juana Gamero de Coca Global Gender and Cultures Award

“Nothing seems more alive than history itself and its eternal contradictions” -- Juana Gamero de Coca (1959-2017)

The International and Global Studies Program and the Middlebury Journal of Global Affairs welcome nominations for the Professor Juana Gamero de Coca Global Gender and Cultures Award. 

Celebrating professor Gamero de Coca’s passionate commitment to gender, class, and race justice, the award highlights students’ work focusing on global gender and cultures authored by Middlebury College students. The winning piece will receive an award of $500, and runners-up will receive $250.  All recipients will be published in the Middlebury Journal of Global Affairs.

To Faculty: please nominate your students’ best research papers, fiction, personal essays, or poetry on topics related to global gender and cultures, written in English or in any of the languages taught full-time at Middlebury College, submitted from Fall 2019. Length should be between 500 and 2500 words.

The deadline for nominations and submissions is February 13, 2021. 

The awards will be presented on March 11, 2021 during the annual Juana Gamero de Coca Day of Learning on Global Cultures. The event will feature a panel and a keynote presentation by the Chilean feminist collective Lastesis:https://time.com/collection/100-most-influential-people-2020/5888485/lastesis/

Please contact Prof. González Zenteno if you have any questions.  https://www.middlebury.edu/office/rohatyn/news-and-publications/global-reader

Black Lives Matter Statement

Black Lives Matter at the International and Global Studies program

The International and Global Studies Steering Committee condemns the egregious acts of violence committed by police against George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and countless other Black Americans in their homes and on the streets of U.S. cities. We are keenly aware that the roots of this oppression reach deep into U.S. history as it funded its economic expansion on stolen lands and on the backs of kidnapped and enslaved Africans. In the Twenty-first century, U.S. economic dominance continues to use Black Americans—and others here and the world over—as disposable sources of cheap labor. When they demand their rights they risk being harassed, dispossessed, incarcerated, and murdered.

As faculty members, we commit to deepen the understanding of globalized forces perpetuating oppression, and also the networks that promote practices and cultures of resistance. And we offer our students the intellectual tools to dismantle oppression and support social justice. 

We also promise to continue enhancing our pedagogical approaches to ensure that all Black American students thrive as they study our courses and participate in our activities. 

As we endeavor to become a wiser, more welcoming program, we invite you to share your ideas and suggestions with us. Please contact Professor Gloria Estela González Zenteno at gonzalez@middlebury.edu.