Poster that dispels the myth that most Spanish-speakers in the US are immigrants
Posters created by students in SPAN 426- Spanish in the US.

Spanish

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Beginning Spanish I
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of grammar and focuses on the development of four skills in Spanish: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. This course is for students who have not previously studied Spanish. Students are expected to continue with SPAN 0104 after successful completion of SPAN 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

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Course Description

Beginning Spanish II
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students’ proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0101 or placement exam) 6 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Spring 2025

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Course Description

Intermediate Spanish
This accelerated course is designed to review, reinforce, and consolidate the linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. A grammar review will accompany intensive language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, readings, discussions, and compositions. (SPAN 0103 or SPAN 0105 or SPAN 0104 or placement tests) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Intermediate Spanish II
A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0201, SPAN 0210, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Spanish for Heritage Speakers
This course is specifically designed for heritage speakers, i.e., individuals who grew up speaking Spanish at home but were formally educated in another language, or individuals from similar contexts. In this course students will learn about different aspects of their own varieties of Spanish, social perceptions towards them, and how these varieties are valid forms of communication. Additionally, students will study grammatical differences between their varieties of Spanish and a more formal, academic Spanish. The grammatical aspects will primarily focus on written Spanish, vocabulary, and verb tenses that tend to vary in different varieties of Spanish. (by placement exam or waiver) 3 hrs. lct.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, EUR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. This analysis is both phonetic and social, in that students learn the social meanings of different pronunciation patterns across these Spanish-speaking countries as they relate to race, ethnicity, class, education, gender, age, and other social factors. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Fall 2023

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

XICANXRIBEÑXS: Our Stories, Our Worlds
In this course we will study how Chicanos/Xicanxs and Hispanic Caribbean communities have organized networks of solidarity to overcome oppression and work towards liberation. The Spanish portmanteau “XICANXRIBEÑXS” is an ode to the famous Revista Chicano-Riqueña that evolved out of the Civil Rights Movement and the rise of Ethnic Studies in the 1960s and early 1970s. We will examine their de/colonial histories, contentious status as diasporic communities, and literary and artistic legacies. Some topics may include Latinx print culture, Gloria Anzaldúa’s mestiza feminism in relation to Afro-Caribbean feminisms, and musical cultures from/ bomba/ and fandango to Selena and Cardi B. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Narratives of Diversity in 21st Century Spain
In this course we will explore recent Spanish voices that denounce the inequalities suffered historically by minorities in that country. These narratives strive to criticize oppression and to create a more inclusive space of coexistence. We will analyze the memoirs of the Afro-Spanish activist Desiree Bela-Lobedde and of the Asian-Spanish singer Chenta Tsai. We will also analyze queer cultures in rural spaces, and the controversial use of flamenco by singer Rosalía, among other topics. Finally, through the essay Ofendiditos by Lucía Litjmaer, we will analyze the reactions that these narratives encounter in the current Spanish and international political climate. 3 hrs.lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Ideas and Cultures of the Southern Cone
What’s in a name? A sub-region of Latin America, the Southern Cone consists of three countries marked by cultural, geographical, historical, sociopolitical (dis)connection. In this course we will approach Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay not only as nations, but as a region with extensive transnational connections. Through analysis of a wide-range of cultural products like Ercilla’s early modern epic poem La Araucana, Figari’s paintings depicting candombé culture, and films of the New Argentine Cinema, we will study aspects of the cultural identities and intellectual histories of these countries and the region. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

A Bridge Between Nations: Introduction to Galician Culture and Language
Galicia is a cultural region in the Iberian Peninsula. In this course we will explore how the study of the Galician region, its language and culture, can help us develop a deeper understanding of the Luso-Hispanic world. This will be an interdisciplinary course in which we discuss history and politics (formation of the region, its place in the globalized world and Spain); key sociolinguistic terms (diglossia, minoritized/minority language); and cultural manifestations while we explore and learn a new, but familiar, language. (SPAN 220 or PGSE 0215 or equivalent). 3 hrs.lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will explore a broad selection of dramas from Spain and Spanish America. We will focus on close readings of plays, considering, where relevant, their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical vocabulary and writing skills in Spanish. Texts will be selected from various periods from the Middle Ages to present day. Authors include: Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Tirso de Molina, Alarcón, Castellanos, Gambaro, García Lorca, Mihura, Díaz, Solórsano. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Whose “New World”?: Early Latin America after Eurocentrism
Colonialism in the so-called New World may have begun with Columbus in 1492, but its impact continues to be felt across the lands that some Indigenous groups call Abya Yala today. In this course we will study how Indigenous and Black communities and other human actors in the region spearheaded, since the late fifteenth century, the first global wave of decolonization in response to the catastrophic transformations brought about by early modern Spanish imperialism. We will consider oral and written testimonies, visual art, material artifacts, and cultural performances from pre-Hispanic times to the long eighteenth century. Our goal will be to re-imagine an early Latin American world beyond/outside/after Eurocentrism. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Film
The cinema is a space of social interaction, of entertainment, of bodily (dis)pleasure, of cultural critique, of commerce, of many things. In this course we will study, with a focus on comparative analysis, the text and context of films produced throughout the Hispanic world. Through examining the work of filmmakers from diverse backgrounds, we will closely analyze film form and engage key debates in film theory such as authorship, genre (comedy, documentary, melodrama, etc.), and (trans)national cinema, as well as explore the ways in which class, culture, disability, history, politics, race, and sexuality are represented cinematically. Critical, scholarly, and theoretical readings will supplement film viewings. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

Requirements

ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Resistencia Latinex
How do Latinex people resist oppression? Chilean survivors of the Pinochet dictatorship preserve their historical memory through textile art; Mexican Indigenous women expel the triple mafia of drug gangs, government, and police from their town; in Vermont, migrant workers sustain the dairy industry and themselves despite structural and institutional violence. Through stories of resistance to oppression, students will learn how communities and individuals take on misogyny, environmental injustice, slavery, and or structural violence. They will convey their findings in personal essays, historical fiction, and public presentations. In Spanish. 3 hrs. lect. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1557)

Terms Taught

Spring 2025

Requirements

AMR, LNG, NOR

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Course Description

Latin American Queer Culture
In this course we will study LGBTQ cultural productions from Hispanic Latin America, including fiction, poetry, film, visual art, and theory, covering works from the Southern Cone, the Andes, the Caribbean, Central America, and Mexico. We will pay special attention to the uses of queerness in portrayals of ideological conflict: when and how does queerness become an element of dissent, an ethic of resistance, a critique of normativity, a marketable quality. Topics will include indigenous sexualities pre-Conquest, the impact of colonial rule, homonationalism, the criminalization of homosexuality, queer activism, and sexuality from transgender//travesti/ and nonbinary perspectives.

Terms Taught

Fall 2023, Fall 2024

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The course’s goals are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. We will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), as well as the history and sociolinguistic variation of the Spanish language, as spoken in communities in Europe, Latin America, and Northern America. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs, illustrating these linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Creative Reading & Writing
In this course we will read and write short stories in Spanish. After Borges, Latin American writers understand their task as the creative reading and rewriting of literary tradition. The first module of the course is devoted to developing students’ awareness of how reading and writing are intertwined through intertextuality. The second module offers a workshop in which students will produce their own fiction and comment on their classmates’ work. Through creative reading and writing, students will hone their skills in Spanish. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Superhero Parodies
In this class we will discuss how the superhero/adventure genre in comic books was initially constructed as a mouthpiece of traditionalist nationalist values in the United States and Spain. Through the study of theories of intertextuality and postcolonial theory, students will analyze how Hispanic/Latin comic book creators from Europe and the Americas have parodied the hegemonic values that have influenced our views of economics, gender, and race with the goals of bringing diversity and inclusion in this particular graphic narrative genre. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2024

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Migrant Oral Narratives: Resistance and Self-Care from Central America to Vermont
This course focuses on the oral practices that migrants have developed to care for themselves and their communities as they face the challenges of life in a foreign environment. Using their ears, hands and voices, students will learn through podcasts and videos, but also through service activities, participant observation and conversations as we partner with Vermont organizations such as Migrant Justice, Addison Allies and Viva el Sabor. The product of their work will include team teaching and a podcast. 3 hrs sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2024

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Youth Cultures in Contemporary Spain
In this course we will explore youth cultures in contemporary Spain (1980-2016). In 1985 the Spanish punk rock band Siniestro Total wrote the song “I Will Dance On Your Grave”, a metaphor for the end of the dictatorship and the beginning of “freedom”. We will explore the colorful Movida (80s), the grunge movement (90s), queer cultures (2000s), and the disenchantment (2010s). All these events will be framed in a global context and accompanied by critical theory. Through literature, comics, film, arts, and music, we will discuss issues of sexuality, drugs, family, gender, and politics. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2025

Requirements

EUR, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

A Spanish Culture Through Art: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, and Dali
In this course we will study the rich artistic heritage of Spain by examining in depth the life and works of the four most internationally renowned Spanish Artists of all times: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, and Dalí. Our objective will be to go beyond knowledge of the peculiarities or style of each artist. We will seek to relate the images represented in the paintings to Spanish culture of the various periods, identify their prevailing values and ideas, and discover what the artists teach us about Spain and its contributions to Western civilization. In addition, we will explore the legacy they have left behind, a fact that makes possible a continuous artistic resurgence generation after generation. We will visit virtually El Prado Museum, Thyssen Bornemisza Museum, Reina Sofía Museum, and Salvador Dalí Museum. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

ART, EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Streaming Spain
Streaming companies such as Netflix and Amazon Prime have changed forever the audiovisual scenario due to their innovative distribution practices and their agreements with national production companies. In this course, we will analyze how content (movies and shows) produced and/or showcased by these multinational streaming platforms shape the understanding of modern Spain in the globalized context. To do so, we will study comedies Valeria, Paquita Salas, Lo nunca visto, narco-fictions Fariña, Vivir sin permiso, dramas Adú/, /Merlí: Sapere Aude, and thrillers La casa de papel, O sabor das margaridas to delve into issues of identity, class, gender representation, economic insecurity, and globalization. (SPAN 220 or equivalent). 3 hrs.lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Winter 2025

Requirements

EUR, LNG, WTR

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Course Description

Hispanic Performance Studies
Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that borrows from theatre studies, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies. This course offers an introduction to performance studies through a focus on Hispanic culture. We will ask the question “What is performance?” and develop the tools to describe, analyze, and interpret a broad range of performances such as plays, political speeches, bullfights, protests, recordings, celebrations, and everyday encounters.  We will focus on performance as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way of engaging the world. We will concentrate on the overlapping aspects of performance as/of literature (poetry and drama), as/of everyday life (ritual, identity, and culture), and as/of politics (power, activism, and social change).  We will pay particular attention to the relationship of performance to social culture, investigating the link between performance and race, gender, and sexuality.  Because the goal of the course is to produce critical thinkers who are capable of using performance as an analytical tool and as part of a creative process, students will be required to perform. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2025

Requirements

AMR, ART, LNG, NOR

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Course Description

Sound, Race, and Resistance
In this course, we will examine how works from across Latin America address intersections of listening and race. Exploring where sound serves as a site of racialization as well as how the ear can construct and contest difference, we will place films, literary texts, a tape documentary, and even a radio play into conversation with readings from the interdisciplinary field of sound studies. Doing so will allow us to consider how we might counter essentialist notions of sound as we critique misguided understandings of necessary connections between voice and race, to name one key concern. In addition to contemplating these ways that our ears have been tuned or trained, we will also study works that demand we listen differently.

Terms Taught

Winter 2024, Winter 2025

Requirements

AMR, LNG, WTR

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Course Description

Advanced Conversation
In this course we will focus on the development of oral skills in Spanish at the advanced level. Students will also be exposed to cultural context in Spanish, through which they will be introduced to social and political trends in the Spanish-speaking world. Through oral exams, presentations, debates, and other forms of oral assessment, students will deepen their oral skills, as well as their understanding and production of oral expression in the target language. The course will give special attention to communicative skills in Spanish, particularly speaking (including pronunciation) and listening. The instructor may choose specific grammar points for review when necessary. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Peru: Identity, Ethnicity, History
In this course we will study Peru’s diverse cultures, races, and ethnicities. Our discussion of Peruvian identity(-ies) will be connected to an exploration of selected topics of history and politics, with an emphasis on contemporary Peru: the Internal Conflict, Fujimori's dictatorship, and the return to democracy (1980-the present). We will read literary works and historical accounts, watch films and documentaries, and look at art and photography in order to extract their key themes and better understand the construction of Peru as a complex, multilingual nation, considering its past, present, and future. Relations with the United States and Latin America will be addressed. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect/disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Representations of Social, Cultural, and Political Identities in Spain
In this course we will study the different representations of Spanish culture and politics. We will emphasize specific aspects that make Spain richly varied: Spain´s breathtaking reinvention and reaffirmation of its own identity after the Disaster of 1898, religious customs and conflicts, gender relations, political values of Spaniards. At the same time, the cultural impact of Don Quixote, Goya, Lorca, republicanism and dictatorship, civil war, flamenco, bullfighting, and soccer. Works to be discussed include a short selection of literary pieces, cultural, visual, musical, and film representations. This course is recommended for students planning to study in Spain. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Fall 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Understanding Iberian Identity through the Analysis of Spanish and Portuguese National Identities
In this course we will focus on different ways of understanding how the complex idea of “Iberian Identity” has been represented and reframed in Spain and Portugal over the centuries. In particular, we will analyze the concept of “Iberian Identity” as one that emerges directly from the differences and similarities already contained in the Spanish and Portuguese national identity discourses from the nineteenth-century to the present. We will put special emphasis on a full range of controversial collective narratives and memories that have shaped the Spanish and Portuguese discourses on national identity. We will look for power and social relations that are highlighted by the different and complementary discursive strategies of the dominant and subordinate discourses in both countries. We will deal with a variety of materials ranging from journal articles, political discourses, photographs, paintings, music, films, documentaries, and interviews, among others. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2024

Requirements

CMP, EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Literature in the Time of Code
Literary works can help us think critically about the possibilities and problems posed by new technologies. But what contemplative or creative spaces can literature establish now that reading and writing increasingly occur alongside forms of computation ranging from social media algorithms to artificial intelligence? In this course, which is anchored in Argentina but also incorporates texts from elsewhere in Latin America, we will examine some complexities that arise when literature confronts code. Resisting accounts of technological determinism and instead contemplating how literary texts can help us assess the changes that code enacts, we will consider materials including speculative short stories, a cy-fi novel, poetry generators, and manifestos, and we will even evaluate the limits of computational approaches to literary analysis.

Terms Taught

Spring 2024

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Reproduction, Maternity, and Abortion in Latin America
Motherhood is a topic that has long been dismissed as trivially feminine and therefore understudied as a literary theme. However, during the 21st Century, there has been a boom of Latin American literature with maternal themes. In this course, we will consider essays, novels, and poetry with themes such as pregnancy, miscarriage, fertility, abortion, family planning, birth, adoption, and communal motherhood practices. The goal is to give students the analytic tools to understand the conditions that gave rise to this trend and how these works invoke and/or resist essentialist and patriarchal notions of motherhood. Texts may include Margaret Gibson’s Queering Motherhood, Linda Kerber’s “The Republican Mother,” Lina Meruane’s Contra los hijos, Pilar Quintana’s La perra, and Isabela Zapata’s In vitro.

Terms Taught

Spring 2024

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Lusa-Hispanic Painting from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Eras
The main goal of this course is to analyze art. Focusing on aesthetics, we will learn to appreciate the differences between Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque painting. Regarding formal elements we will work on the use of lines, colors, proportions, and perspective. Artistic appreciation will be complemented with readings on historical and theoretical issues regarding the intersection between imperial power and religion, race, and ethnicity (Casta painting), mythology, the use of the body as a metaphor, still lifes, and Vanitas painting. The course will also include a chapter on art by ‘forgotten’ women, as well as a chapter on architecture, including Brazilian colonial monuments. Students will compare artistic manifestations from Portugal, Spain and the New World, and will be able to trace connections with contemporary art. Among artists included: El Greco, Clara Peeters, Velázquez, Josefa de Óbidos, Goya, Illescas and The Quito School of Art, Villalpando, Correa, and Cabrera (México), Aleijadinho, Zapata, Master of Calamarca and many anonymous painters from the Cusco School (Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia).

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2023

Requirements

ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Rewriting National Fictions: Adapting Citizenship in Foundational Narratives
How do new nations consolidate their citizenry under a collective identity with shared traits, beliefs, and values? How do contemporary citizens grapple with the constraints on the ideal citizen? In this course we study the “foundational fictions” that united Latin American countries after their independence from Spain, using Argentina as our principal case study. We analyze the implications of these narratives, namely who is excluded? To answer this question, we perform comparative readings of foundational fictions and their reinterpretations that seek to identify and rectify these exclusions. Texts include Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities; Doris Sommer’s Foundational Fictions; José Hernandez’s Martín Fierro and Gabriela Cabezón Cámara’s Las aventuras de la China Iron; Domingo Faustino Sarmiento’s Facundo and Ricardo Piglia’s Respiración artificial.

Terms Taught

Winter 2024, Winter 2025

Requirements

LIT, LNG, WTR

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Course Description

Indigenous peoples and social movements in Bolivia
Quechua and Aymara people of the Andes, and the indigenous nations from the Lowlands have been key in grassroots movements in Bolivia in the 21st century. We will study historical and present indigenous decolonial and environmental struggles, tackling issues of political representation and self-representation. We will look at indigenist literature and film, the Constitution of the Plurinational State of Bolivia, and indigenous journalism and performance. The Bolivian case will be placed in context with other social movements in the region and the Global South. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

Requirements

AMR, HIS, LNG

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Course Description

Afro-Caribbean Music Genres
In this course we will study Afro-Caribbean music genres (eg, reggae, mambo, salsa, merengue, reggaeton, and calypso) and their impact within the region and on the global stage. Our main goal will be to compare the contested theoretical concept of cultural hybridity among the larger Caribbean nations (Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Dominican Republic) and their diasporas. We will also explore how Caribbean musicians and superstars work within the global infrastructure of the music/dance industry, while occasionally managing to counter the hegemonic erasure of the legacy of Black rebellion, worker revolution, nationalism, and racial/gender politics. (SPAN 0220 or 300 level Spanish course) 3 hrs. lect

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Athletes: Sports, Nationalist Culture, and the Global Media
In this course, we will study sports as an essential part in the construction of nationalist pride and perceptions of race, class, and gender in several Hispanic nation-states and subcultures in Europe and the Americas. We will analyze fictional narrative content such as literature and films (Pepe el Toro, Sugar, Black Diamonds, and many others). In addition, we will also explore how media outlets such as newspapers, magazines, videogames, documentaries, and the internet affect our perceptions of sporting events and their superstars to create controversies, support hegemonic nationalist ideas, and further the commercial ambitions of corporations. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

The Luso Hispanic Fiction Writer
In this course we will study the representation of the writer of fiction in Luso-Hispanic contemporary narrative. As Julio Premat argues, writers often understand their task not only as the creation of literary works, but also as the fashioning of an authorial self within fiction and through essays, interviews, photographs. We will study how and why such images are crafted, and how they reflect ideas about the aesthetic and political role of the writer, the “truth” of fiction, the interplay between literature and reality, and the relationship between authorship and gender. Portuguese-language texts will be read in Spanish translation. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Musical Films
In this course we will study Hispanic musical films (including fiction and documentaries) from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Our main goal will be to understand how Hispanic countries use this cinematic genre to establish nationalist constructions and ideologies, and how this has consequently affected the development of Hispanic musical narratives in the United States. Analyses will focus on how different ethnic aspects are defined as 'Other' in musical genres such as Flamenco, Tango, Rancheras, Tex-Mex, Salsa, Reggaeton, Merengue, and Spanish Rock. We will explore why Hispanic musicals are perceived as exotic in relation to their Anglophone counterparts while studying films such as Buena Vista Social Club, Allá en el rancho grande, Selena, and El día que me quieras. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./screening

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, LIT

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Course Description

Catholicism in Latin America
In this course we will study cultural representations of the long history and deep influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Latin America. Beginning with the colonization of the Americas in the 15th century, Catholicism has vastly contributed to shape the continent in every respect and is currently the major religion of nearly every Latin American country, with more than 425 million Catholics: almost 40% of the world's total Catholic population. It is impossible to understand Latin America without studying the impact of this world religion. Students will learn about colonial evangelization, new local forms of Catholicism, anticlericalism, liberation theology, the growth of Evangelicals, the papacy of Pope Francis, as well as the artistic footprint of Catholicism through the analysis of historical, cultural, filmic, and literary texts.

Terms Taught

Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

AMR, LNG, PHL

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Course Description

Understanding Decolonial Thought
In this course we will read texts on decolonial theory to analyze cinema from the Americas (e.g. White Zombie, King Kong, Pelo malo, Get Out, Rhymes for Young Ghouls, The Milk of Sorrow, A Fantastic Woman, The Silent House, Too Late To Die Young, The Lost Daughter and Soldiers or Zombies, S1). Decolonizing requires the exposure of structures of oppression that remain in a society after colonization. We will therefore focus on coloniality of power (e.g. intersection of race and capitalism, biopolitics), coloniality of gender (abortion, the privilege of the phallus, hypersexualization, violence against female and trans bodies), coloniality of knowledge (education, privileging the Global North), coloniality of being (religious imaginaries, existential phenomenology), and visuality vs. countervisuality (what we are allowed to see vs. what is there to be seen). Among authors included: Quijano, Fanon, Mbembe, Lugones, Segato, hooks, Maldonado-Torres, Mierzoff, Coates, Wynter, and Ahmed.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023, Spring 2024

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Stars and Stardom in Latin America
Manila, 2013: Lionel Messi features in a WeChat ad. São Paulo, 1995: Ninón Sevilla walks into frame on an imported telenovela. Middlebury, 1938: Lupe Vélez appears in Life Magazine. Impinging upon even our most mundane moments, stars and stardom have become integral to our modern experience. Through the study of theories on stardom, as well as an array of works of cultural production (films, music, images, performances, etc.), in this course we will examine cultural, economic, political, racial, and social factors that influence the creation, development, and perpetuation of understandings of individual stars and, more generally, stardom in Latin America. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LNG

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Course Description

Soccer in Latin America
Why are Latin Americans so passionate about soccer? The answer to this question is a complex and multifaceted one. The history of this passion goes back to the mid-19th century when British workers were sent to Latin America to build railroads and operate railroad companies. Along with them, soccer arrived in the region. The first documented match took place in Argentina in 1867. Since then, soccer quickly spread out over Latin America to become the most popular sport — by a large margin — in nearly every country. In this course we will examine the history of soccer in Latin America and its links to politics, culture, racial issues, and gender discrimination. We will also take a look at the lives of iconic figures such as Di Stéfano, Garrincha, Pelé, Maradona, Messi, and Marta. The course is intended to finish with a soccer practice and a match against another team. 3hrs.sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Decolonizing Zombies!
Zombies are generally depicted as metaphors that represent contemporary affects. In this course we will study a number of zombie movies with a focus on theories of race, gender, coloniality, iconoclasm, and queer temporality. With a strong emphasis on the American continent, the course will have a global approach, which will allow us to delve into issues of neoliberalism, cannibalism, genocide, diaspora, virus spread, and political criticism. The main goal is to expose colonial structures embedded in the representation of zombies, as well as in the making of the genre. Among films included are: White Zombie, The Night of the Living Dead, Savageland, World War Z (United States); Mangue negro (Brazil), Juan de los muertos (Cuba), El desierto (Argentina), El año del apocalipsis (Peru); Ladronas de almas, Halley (Mexico); Descendents (Chile), Rec (Spain), I’ll see You in my Dreams (Portugal), The Girl with All the Gifts (United Kingdom); Train to Busan (Korea); The Empire of Corpses, and Versus (Japan). (Two 3XX courses or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Exploring Orientalist Adventures in the Americas
In this class we will study 20th and 21st century adventure narratives from the Americas to explore how artists have struggled to represent Asian or Middle East cultures within or against Western imperialist ideologies. We will use Edward Said’s seminal work Orientalism as a theoretical framework and study how racist narratives are predominant within our industrial mass media (radio, serials, films, comic books, social media, and streaming services). Furthermore, we will explore how new gender and race paradigms have provided space for adventure narratives that attempt to dismantle the biases against Asian citizens in the Americas. This class will cover from Martial Arts narratives in the United States to Mexican Geisha comic books to Argentinean adventures in the Middle East.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Decolonizing Porn: Circulating Desire between Europe and the Americas
In this course we will use feminist, queer, critical race, and decolonial theories to analyze porn in Europe and the Americas. The goal is to give students the analytic tools they need to think deeply about the centrality of porn to our lives and to global capitalism, creating jobs in the “gig economy” as well as huge amounts of profit even as it extracts unpaid labor from trafficked bodies. We will consider pornographic photography, cinema, AI, and deep fakes. Texts will include Linda Williams’ Hard Core: Power, Pleasure, and the ‘Frenzy of the Visible,” Gayle Rubin’s “Thinking Sex,” Heather Berg, Porn Work and Jennifer Nash’s The Black Body in Ecstasy. In the SPAN section of the course, students will also be asked to participate in Spanish at least three times on the Spanish-language day of the class. All students will present their public-facing projects at the end of the class. (GloDeFem)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2024

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

The Latin American ‘novela total’
In this seminar we will read Latin American ‘total novels’: long and complex fictional artifacts that purport to map the whole of reality in all its perspectives. We will analyze the structure of landmark ‘total novels,’ explore the intersection of modernist aesthetics and Cold War politics that made them possible, and probe their current relevance. Texts may include Cien años de soledad (1967) by García Márquez and Conversación en La Catedral (1969) by Vargas Llosa, as well as more recent novels that attempt to renew this tradition. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2023

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World
What does it mean to be bilingual? In this course we will study bilingualism with a special emphasis on Spanish-speaking bilinguals in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Course topics will include social, political, linguistic, and psychological aspects of bilingualism. Special attention will be paid to societal bilingualism, language use among a group or community, individual bilingualism, how an individual’s language use changes in different contexts and throughout an individual’s lifespan, and government and educational policies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will study texts, speech samples, and media that highlight different aspects of bilingualism. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) (not open to students who have taken SPAN/LNGT 0377) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Creative Writing: Long Form Narrative
This course offers students the opportunity to advance in creative writing in Spanish. Students will create a long-form work—a novella, a collection of interrelated short stories, or a collection of interrelated autobiographical narratives. Through workshops and analyses of literary models, students will develop narrative and stylistic techniques to produce at least twenty-five pages of polished creative work around a unified topic. Prior creative writing experience would be helpful. (Senior Majors or by approval) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LNG

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Course Description

Colonial Objects: Materiality and the Invention of the New World
Beyond gold and silver, what objects served as the building blocks of Spanish colonialism in the New World? What is the relationship between material culture and mestizaje? How do indigenous and black bodies—the flesh of unsovereign otherness—materialize in the language of empire? In this seminar we will explore the role of objects and material culture in shaping colonial discourse during the long history of colonialism in Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean. Our primary readings assemble an operational canon: from “discovery” and early-contact narratives by Cristóbal Colón and Fray Ramón Pané to the proliferation of ambivalent discourses about colonial subjects, objects, and others that pose a threat to colonial order, including works by Bernardo de Balbuena, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Alongside these texts, we will consider as well examples of material culture (maps, visual art, artifacts, commodities, and archaeological remnants) from pre-Columbian and colonial times to the present (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LIT

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Course Description

In the Middle of Nowhere: Rural Spain through History
In this course we will analyze visual and narrative discourses related to rural communities in Spain. From a historical point of view, we will explore literary concepts such as bucolismo and naturalismo, the paleto cinema of the Francoism era and its contestation in Los santos inocentes. From there we will move to contemporary issues such as the vindication of the España vaciada, and new critical approaches such as the glocal, the rurban, and ecofeminism. We will include the voices of Ana Iris Simón, Oliver Laxe and María Sánchez that portray rural spaces and its inhabitants with respect and dignity. The goal of this course is to showcase rural spaces as sophisticated, diverse, and complex while we explore our own experience of Middlebury as a rural place. (Al least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver.) 3hrs.lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2024

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Gabriel García Márquez's Cien años de soledad
Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez is one of the most significant authors of 20th century literature, and Cien años de soledad is often considered the most important Latin American novel ever written. In this course we will delve into this masterpiece from different perspectives. Through close-reading we will focus on its literary aspects - form, style, metaphor - while making connections with García Márquez’s life, Colombian history, Cold War politics, the Latin American Boom, metafiction, magical realism, and issues of race and gender. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) (formerly SPAN 0378) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Understanding the Myth of Don Juan in the Western Tradition
The myth of Don Juan has embodied the thoughts, desires, and aspirations of multiple authors from different times and countries. In this course we will gain insights into core characteristics that define the Don Juan persona. We will analyze the original components of the character of Don Juan, situate the myth in its social and historical contexts, and study the different dramatic and literary strategies used by authors, artists, and filmmakers in their construction of Don Juan. Resources to be analyzed will include: fiction, poetry, film (fiction and documentary), philosophical essays, painting, music, and performance. 3 hrs lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

EUR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Witches in Global Visual Culture
In this course we will study the global visual representation of witches. During the 15th-18th century witch trials were responsible for the killing of between 40,000-50,000 women. In the 21st century, women are still being accused of witchcraft, and are murdered because women are believed to bring good or bad luck. Studying the construction of the witch narratives throughout history could alleviate this perception and reduce violence against women. We will examine passages from The Hammer of Witches and witches’ trials, as well as study the intersections between witchcraft, capitalism, and psychoanalysis. We will also focus on the role eugenics and artificial intelligence have played in modifying the depictions of witches. We will consider the way feminism has re-semanticized witches in the fight against patriarchy through political movements, theory (e.g. Silvia Federici) and visual culture by viewing art, graphic novels, TV series, and films from countries throughout the world.

Terms Taught

Fall 2024

Requirements

AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Making Monsters: Global Visual Culture
In this course we will trace a cultural history of the monster, focusing on the construction of monstrosity as an imaginary concept based on cultural ideas regarding power and its manipulation, deformed and reproductive bodies, witchcraft, sexuality, race, the intelligence of female subjects, transgression of heteronormativity, masculine fears, fears of the other, and fears of the unknown and the powerful. Monsters also have a biopolitical dimension and can manipulate our lives. Using a global perspective (e.g. the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa), we will study monsters as depicted in science, art, cinema, and popular culture. We will emphasize feminist, decolonial and horror theories, as well as post- and transhumanism. Resources may include: Divine images, mythological and folklore figures, representation of the Native Americans during colonization, freaks, ‘degenerate’ art, industrial and nuclear accident monsters, vampires, zombies, and mutants. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Latin America in Paris/Paris in Latin America
Paris has been central in cultural exchanges with Latin America, as a model of an ideal city, a rejected cipher of coloniality, and a place of encounters. Many Latin American intellectuals and artists, such as Cesar Vallejo and Remedios Varo, lived and created in Paris. Tango became an Argentinean national symbol after having been recognized in the Parisian night scene. In this course we will study phenomena such as these to understand the dynamics of translation and exchange of people and ideas, and their profound impact on both Latin America and Paris. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LNG

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Course Description

Decolonizing Zombies
Zombies are generally depicted as metaphors that represent contemporary affects. In this course we will study a number of zombie movies with a focus on theories of race, gender, coloniality, iconoclasm, and queer temporality. With a strong emphasis on the American continent, the course will have a global approach, which will allow us to delve into issues of neoliberalism, cannibalism, genocide, diaspora, virus spread, and political criticism. The main goal is to expose colonial structures embedded in the representation of zombies, as well as in the making of the genre. Among films included are: White Zombie, The Night of the Living Dead, Savageland, World War Z (United States); Mangue negro (Brazil), Juan de los muertos (Cuba), El desierto (Argentina), El año del apocalipsis (Peru); Ladronas de almas, Halley (Mexico); Descendents (Chile), Rec (Spain), I’ll see You in my Dreams (Portugal), The Girl with All the Gifts (United Kingdom); Train to Busan (Korea); The Empire of Corpses, and Versus (Japan). (Two 3XX courses or by waiver) (Previously SPAN 0381.) (Not open to students who have already taken SPAN 0381) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Patriarchy’s Toxic Imagination in Global Horror Cinema
What is toxicity and how is this linked to patriarchy and contemporary horror cinema? In this course we will analyze a number of movies in order to understand how the construction of female bodies as monsters is linked to toxic imagination and patriarchal values. Approaching toxicity from Mel Y. Chen’s perspective and using affect theory (e.g. Ahmed), we will delve into issues such as reproductive horror, trans horror, posthumanism, environmentalism, and religious horror. Among movies included: Huesera: The Bone Woman, 2023; Woman of the Photographs, 2023; Crimes of the Future, 2022; Culpa, 2022; Madres, 2021; Titane, 2021; Coven: Akelarre, 2020; Impetigore, 2019; Saint Maude, 2019; Bit, 2019; Mesmeralda, 2019; La casa lobo 2018; The Autopsy of Jane Doe, 2016; Prevenge, 2016; Antibirth, 2016; and Madre, 2016.

Terms Taught

Fall 2023

Requirements

ART, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Spiritual Poetry
In this course we will read Hispanic Catholic spiritual poetry from medieval Spain to the 20th century. St. Thérèse of Lisieux describes spiritual poetry as a “surge of the heart” toward God through praise, thanksgiving, petition, and intercession; however, we will explore how contemporary poets multiply these modalities. We will begin with the psalms, since Christian spiritual poetry often recalls/rewrites Hebrew religious hymns. Students will be introduced to the practice of lectio divina before engaging folk ballads (romances), Golden Age poetry, and modern examples. Authors may include Gonzalo de Berceo, San Juan de la Cruz, Fray Luis de Leon, Santa Teresa de Avila, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Gabriela Mistral, Ernesto Cardenal, and Jorge Eduardo Eielson.

Terms Taught

Winter 2025

Requirements

CMP, LIT, LNG, WTR

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Course Description

Hispanic Catholic Ascetics, Mystics and Saints
What is mortification of the flesh and who is an ascetic? What is sanctity and who is considered holy? What is spiritual marriage and who qualifies as a mystic? In this course we will study chief Spanish (American) Catholic figures of different times and places: Saint John of the Cross (Spain), Saint Teresa of Jesus (Spain), Mary of Jesus of Agreda (Spain), Saint Juan Diego (Mexico), Saint Rose of Lima (Peru), Saint Francis Solanus (Spain-Peru), Saint Óscar Romero (El Salvador), Saint María Antonia de Paz y Figueroa (Argentina). By analyzing their work and ministry, we will understand their sociocultural contexts and explore how religion intersects with issues of evangelization, race and ethnicity, politics and social unrest, and language and identity.

Terms Taught

Fall 2024

Requirements

CMP, LNG, PHL

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Course Description

Hispanic Musical Films
In this course we will study Hispanic musical films (including fiction and documentaries) from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Our main goal will be to understand how Hispanic countries use this cinematic genre to establish nationalist constructions and ideologies, and how this has consequently affected the development of Hispanic musical narratives in the United States. Analyses will focus on how different ethnic aspects are defined as 'Other' in musical genres such as Flamenco, Tango, Rancheras, Tex-Mex, Salsa, Reggaeton, Merengue, and Spanish Rock. We will explore why Hispanic musicals are perceived as exotic in relation to their Anglophone counterparts while studying films such as Buena Vista Social Club, Allá en el rancho grande, Selena, and El día que me quieras. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./screening (formerly SPAN 0361)

Terms Taught

Fall 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LIT

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Course Description

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre (in Spanish)
The first third of this course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of selected plays from Spain or Latin America. Readings on semiotics and performance studies, in addition to other works by the authors, texts of the same genre, and on relevant socio-historical and political topics will complement our study. Problem-based learning will guide the second two-thirds of the semester, dedicated to preparing a full production of one of the plays to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about 3 hours of rehearsal per week outside of regularly-scheduled class time. (At least two courses at the 300-level or above or by waiver) (Formerly SPAN 0399) (Not open to students who have already taken SPAN 0399.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

ART, LNG

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Course Description

Open Topic Research Seminar
In this seminar students will develop a research project on a topic of their choice. At the beginning of the semester, the class will focus on research methodology, the discussion of different cultural theories, and their application. Students will be encouraged to focus on, or make comparisons with, contemporary cultural phenomena that they are passionate about so that they can explore how to discuss current issues from a theoretical perspective. The seminar will include a mixture of group and individual meetings; readings will be adjusted according to students’ interests. At the end of the semester, students will present their final paper in a departmental venue. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above or by waiver) 3hrs. sem/disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Independent Study
The department will consider requests by qualified juniors and senior majors to engage in independent work. (Approval only)

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Winter 2024, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Winter 2025, Spring 2025

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Course Description

Senior Honors Thesis
The department will award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. (Approval only)

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Winter 2024, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Winter 2025, Spring 2025

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Course Description

Socio-cultural Changes in Spain: An Anthropological Perspective ( in Spanish)
The objective of the program is to bring students closer to the knowledge of anthropology through the presentation of studies on Spanish culture and society. The different topics will be approached from the perspective of Social and Cultural Anthropology, emphasizing the cultural diversity that characterizes Spain. We will begin by analyzing the concept of culture and its relevance to anthropology, and we will provide a common theoretical base from which all students can follow the development of the course. We will deal specifically with three topics: urban anthropology, family anthropology, and cultural diversity and immigration.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

EUR, SOC

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Portuguese

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Accelerated Beginning Portuguese
This course is an intensive and fast-paced introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Within a cultural context, emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0115 (formerly PGSE 0210). Open to all students. 6 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Accelerated Beginning Portuguese
This course is an intensive and fast-paced introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Within a cultural context, emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0210. Open to all students. 6 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Advanced Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0210. It is designed to balance textual and cultural analysis with a thorough review of grammar at an intermediate/high level. Students will hone their critical thinking and linguistic skills through guided readings, oral discussions, and short written assignments on Lusophone cultural topics. (PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023, Spring 2024, Spring 2025

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

A Bridge Between Nations: Introduction to Galician Culture and Language
Galicia is a cultural region in the Iberian Peninsula. In this course we will explore how the study of the Galician region, its language and culture, can help us develop a deeper understanding of the Luso-Hispanic world. This will be an interdisciplinary course in which we discuss history and politics (formation of the region, its place in the globalized world and Spain); key sociolinguistic terms (diglossia, minoritized/minority language); and cultural manifestations while we explore and learn a new, but familiar, language. (SPAN 220 or PGSE 0215 or equivalent). 3 hrs.lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Japanese Immigration to Brazil
Japanese Brazilians are the largest ethnic Japanese community outside Japan. What factors gave rise to this community? How did it expand over time? In this course we will study the modern Japanese diaspora from a Brazilian perspective. The first families from Japan arrived in Brazil in 1908. Why did these families leave their country? Which work did Japanese immigrants do? How did they negotiate their Japanese cultural identities within the Latin American context? To what extent have they contributed to the Brazilian culture? In order to answer these and other questions, students will examine and discuss a set of critical/creative sources that include essay, film, testimony, painting, advertisement, poetry, and literary fiction. In the last segment of the course, we will consider a social-economic counterpoint: the context in which Brazilians of Japanese ethnicity followed the reverse path of their grandparents and massively immigrated to Japan during the 1990s. 3 hrs sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Fall 2024

Requirements

CMP, HIS, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

With Flavor: Food and Brazilian Culture
In this course we will focus on the food being produced and consumed in Brazil in its relation to Brazilian culture and history. Topics include how food and Brazilian culinary practices are related to certain aspects of Brazilian society, such as the Northeast’s landed oligarchy, Afro-Brazilian culture in Bahia, regional, national, and transnational identities, women and gender constructs, and the experience of hunger. Narratives (fictional, non-fictional, and theoretical) will be drawn from different media: printed and online texts as well as audio-visual materials, such as songs and popular music videos, films, TV series and cooking programs. The course will also entail preparation and degustation of Brazilian dishes. (PGSE 0215 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

The Black Lusophone Atlantic (in English)
In this course we will examine the histories, power struggles, and cultural formations in Portuguese-speaking spaces of the African Diaspora. The Lusophone, or Portuguese-speaking world, encompasses four continents as a lasting legacy of Portuguese imperialism and the trafficking of enslaved people. Working across and against disciplines, we will critically engage with Black decolonial worldmaking in these spaces and across periods as we re-evaluate and dismantle this so-called Lusophone world and other imperialist geographies. In the process, we will examine connections between Black life in Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Portugal, and more over the last six centuries; and also how Black life re-historicizes these spaces and times. 3 hrs.sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023, Spring 2025

Requirements

CMP, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Narratives from the Margins: Occupying Minds
In this course we will investigate the narratives that marginal voices create in order to symbolically occupy a "space" in society. Taking, as our starting point, the concept of ocupação developed by the MST (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra), we will focus on marginal groups composing Brazilian society, such as landless workers, inmates, or faveladxs. We will also analyze literary and filmic texts that express dissident viewpoints in the 20th and 21st centuries as well as the contemporary scene. In conjunction with these texts, we will discuss an array of online articles that deal with analyzed authors and/or issues that serve as context and counterpoint to these narratives. Texts analyzed will include Tetê Moraes's and Paulo Sacramento's documentaries, MST's poetry and songs, inmates' literature, or Carolina Maria de Jesus's narratives. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2024

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Race, Sex, and Power in the Lusophone World
How do race and sex intersect in the Lusophone world? What can they teach us about the power dynamics behind world-shaping events such as the Inquisition, colonialism, slavery, miscegenation, nationhood, and even plastic surgery? We will explore the connections between violence, racial identity, gender, and sexualityin the histories and cultures of Lusophone nations. Content covered will include literature, film, television, music, historical documents, and interdisciplinary scholarship that offer different insights into how racial and sexual discourses and practices shape or contest power structures. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Brazilian Cinema and Culture
In this course we will analyze how Brazilian cinema has been approaching issues related to Brazilian society and culture since mid-twentieth century to the present. Issues may range from colonialism and neocolonialism, dictatorship and revolutionary movements, and the permanence of violence in the fabric of society, to gender identity and diverse sexualities, or race and racism. Throughout the course we will also learn about different movements, moments, aesthetics, and filmmakers, as well as how filmic genres are constructed in Brazilian cinema. Readings will be taken from film criticism and history, social and historical analysis, as well as from other theoretical frameworks, such as gender theory or critical race theory. (PGSE 0215) Course taught in English.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Fall 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, SOC

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Course Description

Brazilian Cinema: The Wide Angle
In this course we will focus on how Brazilian cinema, from the 1950s popular chanchada comedies onwards, has attempted to represent and give voice to subaltern social groups and subjectivities. The sertanejos and favelados, Indigenous and Black Brazilians, women and LGBTQ+, inmates and revolutionaries, are all in front of the lens, but often holding the camera as well. Films will be from different modes of production, ranging from mass production to independent. Analyses will be informed by readings on film theory and criticism, subalternity, queer theory, feminism, critical race theory, social analysis, and history. (PGSE 0215, or by approval) 3 hrs lect

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LNG

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Course Description

The Luso Hispanic Fiction Writer
In this course we will study the representation of the writer of fiction in Luso-Hispanic contemporary narrative. As Julio Premat argues, writers often understand their task not only as the creation of literary works, but also as the fashioning of an authorial self within fiction and through essays, interviews, photographs. We will study how and why such images are crafted, and how they reflect ideas about the aesthetic and political role of the writer, the “truth” of fiction, the interplay between literature and reality, and the relationship between authorship and gender. Portuguese-language texts will be read in Spanish translation. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

A Cultural History of Brazilian Soccer
Brazilians usually joke that volleyball is the country’s #1 sport, because soccer in Brazil does not count as a sport, it is a religion. In this course students will learn about the history of Brazilian soccer and how it became a “religion”. This history begins in 1895 when Charles Miller, coming from England, organized in São Paulo the first soccer game ever played in Brazil. Since then, the sport has deeply permeated Brazilian culture and arts (literature, music, cinema). Topics to be examined in this historical context are race, social class, gender, politics, and national identity. Materials to be discussed include fictional and non-fictional texts, songs, videos, and movies. Depending on the number of students enrolled, the course will be scheduled to have one soccer practice and one game (against another team) during the semester. Students may opt out of the practice and/or the game if they want. (PGSE 0215, or by approval) 3hrs. lect

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2024

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Soccer in Latin America
Why are Latin Americans so passionate about soccer? The answer to this question is a complex and multifaceted one. The history of this passion goes back to the mid-19th century when British workers were sent to Latin America to build railroads and operate railroad companies. Along with them, soccer arrived in the region. The first documented match took place in Argentina in 1867. Since then, soccer quickly spread out over Latin America to become the most popular sport — by a large margin — in nearly every country. In this course we will examine the history of soccer in Latin America and its links to politics, culture, racial issues, and gender discrimination. We will also take a look at the lives of iconic figures such as Di Stéfano, Garrincha, Pelé, Maradona, Messi, and Marta. The course is intended to finish with a soccer practice and a match against another team. 3hrs.sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Colonial Discourse and Its Legacies in the Lusophone World
In this course we will critically analyze the meanings and ideas that shaped and undergirded European colonialism and its legacies in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and labor. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to how the discourses of colonialism impact power structures concerning nation, globalization, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will also address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, historical sources, literary texts, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 215 or equivalent) 3hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2024

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

The School of Bossa Nova
During the 1950s, Brazil left the image of an exotic country behind to emerge on the world stage as a prosperous and modern nation. The soundtrack to this historical period was Bossa Nova, a revolutionary musical genre that blends together Afro-Brazilian samba and American jazz. In this course students will explore the history of Bossa Nova, its cultural paradigms, and its global impact. As a product of samba and jazz, how did Bossa Nova deal with issues of race and gender? Is Bossa Nova a “whitened” form of samba? How are women represented in Bossa Nova’s lyrics? Also, how were Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes’ songs received in countries such as Japan, France, Cape Verde, Argentina, and the U.S.? How did these songs help change the perception of Brazil from abroad? In order to reflect on these and other questions, we will combine the reading of essays on Brazilian history and culture with the analysis of a number of Bossa Nova’s classics. Moreover, we will dedicate a section of our classes to “practice” these songs. As in the movie The School of Rock, students and teacher will rehearse for a performance, open to the Middlebury community, that will take place on campus by the end of the semester. Music skills are desirable, but not required. (PGSE 0215, or by approval) 3hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2023

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, SOC

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Course Description

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Winter 2024, Spring 2024, Fall 2024, Winter 2025, Spring 2025

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