Here students experiment with crafts, games, and recipes found in a 1992 Cuban manual.
In Professor Raquel Albarrán’s course #CaribeDIY, students learn about a host of literary representations, cultural texts, and material practices from the Hispanic Caribbean. Here students experiment with crafts, games, and recipes found in the 1992 Cuban manual Con nuestros propios esfuerzos (With Our Own Efforts), which compiles crowdsourced ideas on how to make, repair, reuse, and transform everyday objects. Through play and deep reflection, in this course students are invited to engage with issues of inequality and precarity in the region.

Spanish

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Beginning Spanish I
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of grammar and focuses on the development of four skills in Spanish: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. This course is for students who have not previously studied Spanish. Students are expected to continue with SPAN 0102 and SPAN 0103 after successful completion of SPAN 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Beginning Spanish III
This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0101) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020

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Course Description

Accelerated Basic Spanish
This accelerated course is designed to reinforce, in one semester, the basic linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. Strong emphasis will be given to reading and composition. SPAN 0105 is designed specifically for students with 2-3 years of high school Spanish, but who have not yet achieved intermediate proficiency. (Placement test required) 5 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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Course Description

Intermediate Spanish
This accelerated course is designed to review, reinforce, and consolidate the linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. A grammar review will accompany intensive language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, readings, discussions, and compositions. (Placement test required) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Intermediate Spanish II
A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0201, SPAN 0210, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

An Introduction to the Study of Hispanic Literature
This course in literature and advanced language is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and critical writing. The work will be based on the reading of a number of works in prose, drama, and poetry. Frequent short, critical essays will complement readings and provide students with practice in writing. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Creative Non-Fiction in Spanish
This course will introduce students to creative non-fiction in the Spanish language. We will explore the techniques and literary skills necessary for researching and writing memoirs and personal essays, and students will produce at least three polished essays. Readings will include Spanish and Latin American masters and theorists of the genre will include Borges, Cortázar, Castellanos, Larra, Hostos, Paz, and Poniatowska. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CW, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Narratives of Diversity in 21st Century Spain
In this course we will explore recent Spanish voices that denounce the inequalities suffered historically by minorities in that country. These narratives strive to criticize oppression and to create a more inclusive space of coexistence. We will analyze the memoirs of the Afro-Spanish activist Desiree Bela-Lobedde and of the Asian-Spanish singer Chenta Tsai. We will also analyze queer cultures in rural spaces, and the controversial use of flamenco by singer Rosalía, among other topics. Finally, through the essay Ofendiditos by Lucía Litjmaer, we will analyze the reactions that these narratives encounter in the current Spanish and international political climate. (SPAN 220 or equivalent). 3 hrs.lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Ideas and Cultures of the Southern Cone
What’s in a name? A sub-region of Latin America, the Southern Cone consists of three countries marked by cultural, geographical, historical, sociopolitical (dis)connection. In this course we will approach Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay not only as nations, but as a region with extensive transnational connections. Through analysis of a wide-range of cultural products like Ercilla’s early modern epic poem La Araucana, Figari’s paintings depicting candombé culture, and films of the New Argentine Cinema, we will study aspects of the cultural identities and intellectual histories of these countries and the region. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

(Intimate) Otherness in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction
Recent Hispanic literature locates otherness in ambiguous spaces. The "other" can be excluded in order to demarcate selfhood, but also recognized as internal ("intimate") to a complex and perhaps richer self. In this course students will sharpen oral and written communication skills and build a sophisticated vocabulary to analyze the literary and cultural context of the Spanish speaking world. This goal will be accomplished through readings in late 20th/early 21st century short stories and novellas from the Iberian Peninsula and Spanish America. Race, gender, class, nationality, and health are some perspectives we will adopt in order to map the literary production/deconstruction of "others" as marginalized/embraced subjects. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Theatre
In this course we will explore a broad selection of dramas from Spain and Spanish America. We will focus on close readings of plays, considering, where relevant, their historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical vocabulary and writing skills in Spanish. Texts will be selected from various periods from the Middle Ages to present day. Authors include: Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Tirso de Molina, Alarcón, Castellanos, Gambaro, García Lorca, Mihura, Díaz, Solórsano. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

The Hispanic Short Story
In this course we will study the main literary, sociopolitical, and cultural issues in a selection of short stories from the Hispanic world. Emphasis will be on the close reading of texts with the purpose of developing critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include: Pardo Bazán, Valle Inclán, Palma, Borges, Rulfo, Corázar, Quiroga, Matute. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Long Live the Students! Student Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean
In this course we will study student activism in Puerto Rico, Chile, Mexico, and the U.S., focusing on Latin students’ activism in the early 20th century to the present. We will consider approaches to student movements and the role those movements have played in shifting social and political values, practices, and institutions. We will also consider what ideologies and strategies were implemented to shape each student movement. By the end of the course, students will be encouraged to relate these struggles to their lives as students.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, CMP, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Hispanic Film
The cinema is a space of social interaction, of entertainment, of bodily (dis)pleasure, of cultural critique, of commerce, of many things. In this course we will study, with a focus on comparative analysis, the text and context of films produced throughout the Hispanic world. Through examining the work of filmmakers from diverse backgrounds, we will closely analyze film form and engage key debates in film theory such as authorship, genre (comedy, documentary, melodrama, etc.), and (trans)national cinema, as well as explore the ways in which class, culture, disability, history, politics, race, and sexuality are represented cinematically. Critical, scholarly, and theoretical readings will supplement film viewings. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Resistencia Latinex
How do Latinex people resist oppression? Chilean survivors of the Pinochet dictatorship preserve their historical memory through textile art; Mexican Indigenous women expel the triple mafia of drug gangs, government, and police from their town; in Vermont, migrant workers sustain the dairy industry and themselves despite structural and institutional violence. Through stories of resistance to oppression, students will learn how communities and individuals take on misogyny, environmental injustice, slavery, and or structural violence. They will convey their findings in personal essays, historical fiction, and public presentations. In Spanish. 3 hrs. lect. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1557)

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AMR, LNG, NOR

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Course Description

#CaribeDIY: DIY Aesthetics and Alternative Markets in the Hispanic Caribbean
Recent artistic and cultural productions in the Hispanic Caribbean and its diaspora reflect upon conditions of dislocation, neglect, and decay. They resituate the trinomial “building, dwelling, thinking” (Heidegger) in the tropics to foreground the tensions between precarity and excess that have imprinted their stamp in the region. What aesthetic, political, and social projects emerge from recycling and ruination? What are their emancipatory possibilities? Or, on the contrary, are they themselves condemned to reproduce the logics of the market and its multiple forms of violence? In this course we will examine literary and cultural practices from the Hispanic Caribbean (Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic), from the 1970s to the present, which can be loosely grouped under the concept of do-it-yourself or DIY. Some of the major themes include: intellectuals and materiality; technological disobedience; alternative publics and the rise of cartoneras; migration and objecthood; material poetics, gender, and sexual dissidence; autogestión, collective utopias, and the commons; digital cultures and new media; post-nationalism and decolonial approaches. As a final capstone project, all students will complete two requirements: a short final paper and a DIY audiovisual or digital project (a zine, video, artwork, or sound recording, etc.) inspired by the techniques studied. Previous experience on the latter is not necessary, but willingness to experiment in a self-directed manner is essential. (Spanish 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Superhero Parodies
In this class we will discuss how the superhero/adventure genre in comic books was initially constructed as a mouthpiece of traditionalist nationalist values in the United States and Spain. Through the study of theories of intertextuality and postcolonial theory, students will analyze how Hispanic/Latin comic book creators from Europe and the Americas have parodied the hegemonic values that have influenced our views of economics, gender, and race with the goals of bringing diversity and inclusion in this particular graphic narrative genre. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

A Spanish Culture Through Art: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, and Dali
In this course we will study the rich artistic heritage of Spain by examining in depth the life and works of the four most internationally renowned Spanish Artists of all times: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso, and Dalí. Our objective will be to go beyond knowledge of the peculiarities or style of each artist. We will seek to relate the images represented in the paintings to Spanish culture of the various periods, identify their prevailing values and ideas, and discover what the artists teach us about Spain and its contributions to Western civilization. In addition, we will explore the legacy they have left behind, a fact that makes possible a continuous artistic resurgence generation after generation. We will visit virtually El Prado Museum, Thyssen Bornemisza Museum, Reina Sofía Museum, and Salvador Dalí Museum. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

Requirements

ART, EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Performance Studies
Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that borrows from theatre studies, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies. This course offers an introduction to performance studies through a focus on Hispanic culture. We will ask the question “What is performance?” and develop the tools to describe, analyze, and interpret a broad range of performances such as plays, political speeches, bullfights, protests, recordings, celebrations, and everyday encounters.  We will focus on performance as a process–oriented, participatory, and experiential way of engaging the world. We will concentrate on the overlapping aspects of performance as/of literature (poetry and drama), as/of everyday life (ritual, identity, and culture), and as/of politics (power, activism, and social change).  We will pay particular attention to the relationship of performance to social culture, investigating the link between performance and race, gender, and sexuality.  Because the goal of the course is to produce critical thinkers who are capable of using performance as an analytical tool and as part of a creative process, students will be required to perform. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LNG, NOR

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Course Description

Peru: Identity, Ethnicity, History
In this course we will study Peru’s diverse cultures, races, and ethnicities. Our discussion of Peruvian identity(-ies) will be connected to an exploration of selected topics of history and politics, with an emphasis on contemporary Peru: the Internal Conflict, Fujimori's dictatorship, and the return to democracy (1980-the present). We will read literary works and historical accounts, watch films and documentaries, and look at art and photography in order to extract their key themes and better understand the construction of Peru as a complex, multilingual nation, considering its past, present, and future. Relations with the United States and Latin America will be addressed. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect/disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Representations of Social, Cultural, and Political Identities in Spain
In this course we will study the different representations of Spanish culture and politics. We will emphasize specific aspects that make Spain richly varied: Spain´s breathtaking reinvention and reaffirmation of its own identity after the Disaster of 1898, religious customs and conflicts, gender relations, political values of Spaniards. At the same time, the cultural impact of Don Quixote, Goya, Lorca, republicanism and dictatorship, civil war, flamenco, bullfighting, and soccer. Works to be discussed include a short selection of literary pieces, cultural, visual, musical, and film representations. This course is recommended for students planning to study in Spain. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Athletes: Sports, Nationalist Culture, and the Global Media
In this course, we will study sports as an essential part in the construction of nationalist pride and perceptions of race, class, and gender in several Hispanic nation-states and subcultures in Europe and the Americas. We will analyze fictional narrative content such as literature and films (Pepe el Toro, Sugar, Black Diamonds, and many others). In addition, we will also explore how media outlets such as newspapers, magazines, videogames, documentaries, and the internet affect our perceptions of sporting events and their superstars to create controversies, support hegemonic nationalist ideas, and further the commercial ambitions of corporations. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Latin American Journalism
In this course we will study the tradition of Latin American journalism from the end of the 19th century to the present. We will engage the classics such as Mariategui, Gutierrez Najera, and Arlt, as well as more contemporary journalistic production in print, radio broadcasting, on television, (Canal Encuentro; TV Globo) and the internet (blogs). The Cultural Studies approach (Sarlo, Adorno) will inform our reading. Students will produce their own journalistic pieces—both written and audio-visual—in the genres including chronicles, reports, interviews, investigative journalistic pieces, and opinion pieces. 3 hrs. lect/dsc

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, LIT

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Course Description

Hispanic Musical Films
In this course we will study Hispanic musical films (including fiction and documentaries) from Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Our main goal will be to understand how Hispanic countries use this cinematic genre to establish nationalist constructions and ideologies, and how this has consequently affected the development of Hispanic musical narratives in the United States. Analyses will focus on how different ethnic aspects are defined as 'Other' in musical genres such as Flamenco, Tango, Rancheras, Tex-Mex, Salsa, Reggaeton, Merengue, and Spanish Rock. We will explore why Hispanic musicals are perceived as exotic in relation to their Anglophone counterparts while studying films such as Buena Vista Social Club, Allá en el rancho grande, Selena, and El día que me quieras. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./screening

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, LIT

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Course Description

Understanding Decolonial Thought
In this course we will read texts on decolonial theory to analyze cinema from the Americas (e.g. White Zombie, King Kong, Pelo malo, Get Out, Rhymes for Young Ghouls, The Milk of Sorrow, A Fantastic Woman, The Silent House, Too Late To Die Young, The Lost Daughter and Soldiers or Zombies, S1). Decolonizing requires the exposure of structures of oppression that remain in a society after colonization. We will therefore focus on coloniality of power (e.g. intersection of race and capitalism, biopolitics), coloniality of gender (abortion, the privilege of the phallus, hypersexualization, violence against female and trans bodies), coloniality of knowledge (education, privileging the Global North), coloniality of being (religious imaginaries, existential phenomenology), and visuality vs. countervisuality (what we are allowed to see vs. what is there to be seen). Among authors included: Quijano, Fanon, Mbembe, Lugones, Segato, hooks, Maldonado-Torres, Mierzoff, Coates, Wynter, and Ahmed.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Soccer in Latin America
Why are Latin Americans so passionate about soccer? The answer to this question is a complex and multifaceted one. The history of this passion goes back to the mid-19th century when British workers were sent to Latin America to build railroads and operate railroad companies. Along with them, soccer arrived in the region. The first documented match took place in Argentina in 1867. Since then, soccer quickly spread out over Latin America to become the most popular sport — by a large margin — in nearly every country. In this course we will examine the history of soccer in Latin America and its links to politics, culture, racial issues, and gender discrimination. We will also take a look at the lives of iconic figures such as Di Stéfano, Garrincha, Pelé, Maradona, Messi, and Marta. The course is intended to finish with a soccer practice and a match against another team. 3hrs.sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Decolonizing Zombies!
Zombies are generally depicted as metaphors that represent contemporary affects. In this course we will study a number of zombie movies with a focus on theories of race, gender, coloniality, iconoclasm, and queer temporality. With a strong emphasis on the American continent, the course will have a global approach, which will allow us to delve into issues of neoliberalism, cannibalism, genocide, diaspora, virus spread, and political criticism. The main goal is to expose colonial structures embedded in the representation of zombies, as well as in the making of the genre. Among films included are: White Zombie, The Night of the Living Dead, Savageland, World War Z (United States); Mangue negro (Brazil), Juan de los muertos (Cuba), El desierto (Argentina), El año del apocalipsis (Peru); Ladronas de almas, Halley (Mexico); Descendents (Chile), Rec (Spain), I’ll see You in my Dreams (Portugal), The Girl with All the Gifts (United Kingdom); Train to Busan (Korea); The Empire of Corpses, and Versus (Japan). (Two 3XX courses or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

Exploring Orientalist Adventures in the Americas
In this class we will study 20th and 21st century adventure narratives from the Americas to explore how artists have struggled to represent Asian or Middle East cultures within or against Western imperialist ideologies. We will use Edward Said’s seminal work Orientalism as a theoretical framework and study how racist narratives are predominant within our industrial mass media (radio, serials, films, comic books, social media, and streaming services). Furthermore, we will explore how new gender and race paradigms have provided space for adventure narratives that attempt to dismantle the biases against Asian citizens in the Americas. This class will cover from Martial Arts narratives in the United States to Mexican Geisha comic books to Argentinean adventures in the Middle East.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Gender and Violence in the Hispanic World
Differences in the way men and women display violent behavior need to be better understood to prevent acts of murder and massive, often irreversible, harm. In this course we will try to find answers to: What are the origins and explanations of violence in all its forms? How are gendered identities produced and reproduced in society? How is gender implicated in violence? How can the new politics of masculinity inform our discussion of the connection between gender and violence? Discussion and analysis of a variety of materials from different disciplines will form the basis of our exploration, which will focus mainly on the representation of violence in Hispanic culture. Readings will include literary texts by Dolores Redondo, Sergio Álvarez, Élmer Mendoza, and theoretical texts by Suzanne E. Hatt and Elizabeth Wood. (At least two courses at the 0300-level or above or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Decolonizing Porn: Circulating Desire between Europe and the Americas
In this course we will use feminist, queer, critical race, and decolonial theories to analyze porn in Europe and the Americas. The goal is to give students the analytic tools they need to think deeply about the centrality of porn to our lives and to global capitalism, creating jobs in the “gig economy” as well as huge amounts of profit even as it extracts unpaid labor from trafficked bodies. We will consider pornographic photography, cinema, AI, and deep fakes. Texts will include Linda Williams’ Hard Core: Power, Pleasure, and the ‘Frenzy of the Visible,” Gayle Rubin’s “Thinking Sex,” Heather Berg, Porn Work and Jennifer Nash’s The Black Body in Ecstasy. In the SPAN section of the course, students will also be asked to participate in Spanish at least three times on the Spanish-language day of the class. All students will present their public-facing projects at the end of the class.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Linguistic Variation
In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP

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Course Description

National Cinemas and Foreign Labor in Latin America
From its arrival in metropolises from Mexico City to Santiago in 1896, cinema in Latin America has been marked by foreigners. In this course we will rethink traditional national film historiographies, which largely ignore the contributions of foreign film labor beyond their importation of technology and technical expertise. We will explore ways in which specific individuals practiced their jobs (actor, cinematographer, director, sound designer, among others) in significant moments in Latin American cinema, from the silent period to today, and engage key debates in film theory such as authorship, modes of production, national cinema, and transnationalism. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LNG

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Course Description

Decolonizing Zombies
Zombies are generally depicted as metaphors that represent contemporary affects. In this course we will study a number of zombie movies with a focus on theories of race, gender, coloniality, iconoclasm, and queer temporality. With a strong emphasis on the American continent, the course will have a global approach, which will allow us to delve into issues of neoliberalism, cannibalism, genocide, diaspora, virus spread, and political criticism. The main goal is to expose colonial structures embedded in the representation of zombies, as well as in the making of the genre. Among films included are: White Zombie, The Night of the Living Dead, Savageland, World War Z (United States); Mangue negro (Brazil), Juan de los muertos (Cuba), El desierto (Argentina), El año del apocalipsis (Peru); Ladronas de almas, Halley (Mexico); Descendents (Chile), Rec (Spain), I’ll see You in my Dreams (Portugal), The Girl with All the Gifts (United Kingdom); Train to Busan (Korea); The Empire of Corpses, and Versus (Japan). (Two 3XX courses or by waiver) (Previously SPAN 0381.) (Not open to students who have already taken SPAN 0381) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, CMP, LNG

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Course Description

From Page to Stage: Representing Hispanic Theatre (in Spanish)
The first third of this course will be dedicated to an in-depth analysis of selected plays from Spain or Latin America. Readings on semiotics and performance studies, in addition to other works by the authors, texts of the same genre, and on relevant socio-historical and political topics will complement our study. Problem-based learning will guide the second two-thirds of the semester, dedicated to preparing a full production of one of the plays to be presented at the end of the semester. Students will be involved as actors as well as in all aspects of production and decision-making, requiring about 3 hours of rehearsal per week outside of regularly-scheduled class time. (At least two courses at the 300-level or above or by waiver) (Formerly SPAN 0399) (Not open to students who have already taken SPAN 0399.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

ART, LNG

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Course Description

Open Topic Research Seminar
In this seminar students will develop a research project on a topic of their choice. At the beginning of the semester, the class will focus on research methodology, the discussion of different cultural theories, and their application. Students will be encouraged to focus on, or make comparisons with, contemporary cultural phenomena that they are passionate about so that they can explore how to discuss current issues from a theoretical perspective. The seminar will include a mixture of group and individual meetings; readings will be adjusted according to students’ interests. At the end of the semester, students will present their final paper in a departmental venue. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above or by waiver) 3hrs. sem/disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Hispanic Horror Cinema
In this course we will study horror films from Spain, Mexico, the United States, Argentina, and Cuba in order to understand how Hispanic filmmakers employ intertextual horror esthetics to create genre films. The films we will consider focus on zombies (Rec, Planet Terror, Juan of the Dead), vampires (Cronos, Vampires in Havana), ghosts (The Devil's Backbone, The Others), and misogynist stalkers (Thesis, Sleep Tight). We will discuss both the conservative and transgressive aspects of this emerging genre in transnational Hispanic cinema, focusing specifically on how these films reflect the evolving political and ideological dynamics of their respective national cultures. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students who have taken SPAN 1111.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

ART, LNG, WTR

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Course Description

Socio-cultural Changes in Spain: An Anthropological Perspective ( in Spanish)
The objective of the program is to bring students closer to the knowledge of anthropology through the presentation of studies on Spanish culture and society. The different topics will be approached from the perspective of Social and Cultural Anthropology, emphasizing the cultural diversity that characterizes Spain. We will begin by analyzing the concept of culture and its relevance to anthropology, and we will provide a common theoretical base from which all students can follow the development of the course. We will deal specifically with three topics: urban anthropology, family anthropology, and cultural diversity and immigration.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

EUR, SOC

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Portuguese

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Accelerated Beginning Portuguese
This course is an intensive and fast-paced introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Within a cultural context, emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0115 (formerly PGSE 0210). Open to all students. 6 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

Advanced Portuguese
This course is a continuation of PGSE 0210. It is designed to balance textual and cultural analysis with a thorough review of grammar at an intermediate/high level. Students will hone their critical thinking and linguistic skills through guided readings, oral discussions, and short written assignments on Lusophone cultural topics. (PGSE 0103 or PGSE 0210 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

With Flavor: Food and Brazilian Culture
In this course we will focus on the food being produced and consumed in Brazil in its relation to Brazilian culture and history. Topics include how food and Brazilian culinary practices are related to certain aspects of Brazilian society, such as the Northeast’s landed oligarchy, Afro-Brazilian culture in Bahia, regional, national, and transnational identities, women and gender constructs, and the experience of hunger. Narratives (fictional, non-fictional, and theoretical) will be drawn from different media: printed and online texts as well as audio-visual materials, such as songs and popular music videos, films, TV series and cooking programs. The course will also entail preparation and degustation of Brazilian dishes. (PGSE 0215 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Race, Sex, and Power in the Lusophone World
How do race and sex intersect in the Lusophone world? What can they teach us about the power dynamics behind world-shaping events such as the Inquisition, colonialism, slavery, miscegenation, nationhood, and even plastic surgery? We will explore the connections between violence, racial identity, gender, and sexualityin the histories and cultures of Lusophone nations. Content covered will include literature, film, television, music, historical documents, and interdisciplinary scholarship that offer different insights into how racial and sexual discourses and practices shape or contest power structures. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

A Cultural History of Brazilian Soccer
Brazilians usually joke that volleyball is the country’s #1 sport, because soccer in Brazil does not count as a sport, it is a religion. In this course students will learn about the history of Brazilian soccer and how it became a “religion”. This history begins in 1895 when Charles Miller, coming from England, organized in São Paulo the first soccer game ever played in Brazil. Since then, the sport has deeply permeated Brazilian culture and arts (literature, music, cinema). Topics to be examined in this historical context are race, social class, gender, politics, and national identity. Materials to be discussed include fictional and non-fictional texts, songs, videos, and movies. Depending on the number of students enrolled, the course will be scheduled to have one soccer practice and one game (against another team) during the semester. Students may opt out of the practice and/or the game if they want. (PGSE 0215, or by approval) 3hrs. lect

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG

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Course Description

Colonial Discourse and Its Legacies in the Lusophone World
In this course we will critically analyze the meanings and ideas that shaped and undergirded European colonialism and its legacies in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and labor. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to how the discourses of colonialism impact power structures concerning nation, globalization, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will also address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, historical sources, literary texts, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 215 or equivalent) 3hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

The Racial Life of Power: (Trans)national Experiences of Race
In this course we will explore the emergence of race as a category of classification, social construct, and real experience in conjunction with the consolidation of different forms of power including colonialism, slavery, nationhood and globalization. We will take a global and interdisciplinary approach to our study by examining how race operates in national, transnational, and transcontinental power dynamics and imaginaries. Our interrogation of race will consider its central intersections with class, gender, and sexuality in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, and North America at different moments in history. Course materials will include visual media, literary texts, primary historical sources, critical theory, and music. (Taught in English) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Independent Study
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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