Required Courses in Economics

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Economic Statistics (formerly ECON 0210)
An introduction to the discipline of statistics as a science of understanding and analyzing
data with an emphasis on applications to economics. Key topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling, random variables, the Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, p-values, and linear regression. Students will be introduced to a statistical programming language. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. (Formerly ECON 0210) (Not open to students who have taken ECON 0210, MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201.) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

DED

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Course Description

Introductory Macroeconomics
An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Introductory Microeconomics
An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Economic Statistics
Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, or MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

DED

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Course Description

International Economics: Theory and Policy
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will use economic theory to help us understand how and why countries interact in the global economy and evaluate the effects of different trade, exchange rate, and macroeconomic policies. Topics covered will include the reasons for trade, the winners and losers from trade, trade policies, trade agreements, exchange rates, the balance of payments, causes of and solutions to financial crises, and the role of the WTO and IMF. IPEC 0240 does not count towards the ECON major or minor requirements. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) (formerly ECON 0240) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Required Courses in Political Science

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Introduction to Comparative Politics
This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcomes. 3 hrs. lect. disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

International Politics
What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

International Political Economy
This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Electives in Economics

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Introduction to Regression Analysis
In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0111, (formerly ECON 0210) ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

DED

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Course Description

Economics of Happiness
We will explore the economics of happiness in both the micro and macro realm. We start with the neoclassical model of rational individuals who know with great precision what makes them happy. Next we explore behaviorist challenges to that model, including issues of regret, altruism, fairness, and gender. On the macro side, we investigate the puzzle of why, though most of us like more income, a growing GDP does not seem to make societies happier; we examine the impact of the macroeconomic environment on individual happiness. Finally we touch on current policy issues such as quantitative happiness indicators that have been adopted around the world, “paternalistic” policy measures to increase happiness, and the no-growth movement. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Theories of Economic Development in Latin America
This course is designed to provide a survey of the most important issues facing Latin American policymakers today. The course will place contemporary problems in their historical perspective and will use applied economic analysis to examine the opportunities and constraints facing the economies of Latin America. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CW, SOC

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Course Description

Economics of Agricultural Transition
In 1860 farmers made up over half the population of this country and fed about 30 million people. Today they number 2% of the population and produce more than enough to feed 300 million people. In this course we will look at the history, causes, and results of this incredible transformation. While studying the economic forces behind the changing farming structure, we will examine farm production, resources, technology, and agricultural policy. Field trips to local farms and screenings of farm-related videos and movies will incorporate the viewpoint of those engaged in agriculture. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 2hrs. lect., 2 hrs. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Economic History and History of Economic Thought
This course will provide an introduction to economic history and the history of economic thought. We will investigate and understand the causes and consequences of important historical events and trends, such as industrialization and globalization, from an economic perspective. We devote considerable attention to the dissemination throughout Europe of new industrial and agricultural practices originating in Britain. Along the way, we evaluate how prominent economists perceived and analyzed the events of their time. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

EUR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

The Chinese Economy
In this course we will explore the economic development of China up until the present day, giving particular attention to the socialist era and the post-1978 reforms. Specific topics to be covered will include growth and structural change, the urban-rural divide, the state’s ongoing role in the economy, demography, and the country’s integration into the global economy. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

Economics of Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa is home to some of the poorest and some of the fastest growing economies in the world. In this course, we will explore the opportunities for sustained, inclusive economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, the challenges that must be overcome in realizing these opportunities, and the policy options for overcoming these challenges. Topics may include demography, institutions, infrastructure, agriculture, urbanization, climate change, health, natural resources, mobile technology, trade, and regional integration. Students will be exposed to relevant economic theory and recent empirical economic research on Africa. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, SAF, SOC

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Course Description

Environmental Economics
This course is dedicated to the proposition that economic reasoning is critical for analyzing the persistence of environmental damage and for designing cost-effective environmental policies. The objectives of the course are that each student (a) understands the economic approach to the environment; (b) can use microeconomics to illustrate the theory of environmental policy; and (c) comprehends and can critically evaluate: alternative environmental standards, benefits and costs of environmental protection, and incentive-based environmental policies. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Theory and Measurement in Economic History
Economic historians study past events, employing diverse methodologies to understand technology adoption, market integration, and the effect of institutions on performance. In this course we will focus on strategies economists use to learn about the past itself and to use past events to understand how all economies function. We will ponder especially conflicts and complementarities between theoretical and empirical reasoning. Each student will complete a research proposal that justifies applying a set of tools to address an economic history question. (ECON 0111 [formerly ECON 0210] and ECON 0255 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

International Economics
International trade and financial flows are increasingly important in today’s interconnected world. In this advanced course we will use tools from introductory and intermediate courses to help us analyze the causes and consequences of these flows. We will investigate why countries trade, what they trade, who gains (or loses) from trade, and the motives and effects of trade policies. We will then consider the monetary side of the international economy, including the balance of payments, the determination of exchange rates, and financial crises. This course is not open to students who have taken ECON 0240 or IPEC 0240. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021

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Course Description

Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policies for Developing Countries
In this course we will examine key macroeconomics challenges faced by developing countries . In contrast to the senior seminar in Macroeconomics of Development, which focuses on long-run growth, this course focuses on short-run and medium-run macroeconomic issues; as such, it builds more closely on the Macroeconomic Theory core course. The topics covered include structural constraints on aggregate demand, fiscal and monetary policies, distributive conflict, and debt. We will examine these topics through a combination of formal theoretical models and real-world applications. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, CW, SAF

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Course Description

The Economics of Climate Change
In this course we will apply the tools of economic analysis to the problem of global climate change. The goal is to expose students to how economists approach this important policy problem. The course will begin with a review of reasons for policy interventions in markets and policy instrument choice. We will then focus on the measurement of damages from emissions of greenhouse gases. Subsequent topics will include: discounting, technology and abatement costs, benefit-cost analysis, uncertainty and catastrophic risk, and policies in practice. (ECON 0255; ECON 0265 encouraged). 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Poverty, Inequality and Distributive Justice
This seminar will explore recent theoretical and empirical research on socioeconomic inequality. The definitions, causes and consequences of inequality at both the individual (micro) and national and international (macro) levels will be considered. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2022

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Course Description

Economics of Discrimination
In this seminar we will explore the economics of discrimination from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. After reviewing the main theoretical frameworks, we will discuss recent empirical studies on issues of discrimination associated with race, ethnicity, gender, or nationality, focusing on applications in the labor market. We will then investigate to what extent inter-group contact or policies such as quotas or affirmative action can address discrimination. Students will explore a specific topic of interest (e.g., police violence, sexual orientation, sport, education, etc.) in more detail and develop a research proposal. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255 or ECON 0240) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

Requirements

CMP

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Course Description

The Macroeconomics of Economic Development
In this course we will examine macroeconomic aspects of economic development. We will explore theoretical models combining insights from growth theory, classical development theory, and structuralist macroeconomics. Topics include dualism, surplus labor, increasing returns, poverty traps, and the role of external and demand constraints in the growth process. We will also review applied work and case studies, in order to understand how these theories illuminate concrete issues that have faced developing countries (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

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Course Description

Macroeconomics of Depressions
In this course we will develop a framework for analyzing liquidity traps, economic depressions, and failures of macroeconomic stabilization policy. We will contrast the causes of and policy responses to the Great Depression, Japan’s “Lost Decades,” the Great Recession, and the ongoing depression in Greece. We will also study the international transmission of the Great Depression through the gold standard and the global transmission of the Great Recession through modern financial and trade linkages. Throughout, we will track the evolution of views on stabilization policy, austerity, and the costs of prolonged periods of depressed demand. (ECON 0250 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Globalization and US Inequality
Does globalization increase inequality in the United States? In this course we will study how trade, automation, immigration, and financial integration relate to the distribution of income, wealth, and employment in the US over the last century. In the first part of the course we will study theoretical frameworks to shed light on this question. In the second part, we will turn to the data and read peer-reviewed articles, discussing evidence for and against globalization increasing US inequality. Lastly, we will debate policy prescriptions, to address these issues. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020

Requirements

AMR, NOR

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Course Description

Seminar on Economic Development
Much of the world still faces the daily pain of poverty. Developing countries have to accelerate their growth rates, eradicate poverty, reduce inequalities, address environmental concerns, and create productive employment. We examine the major analytic and policy issues raised by these challenges and study the need for a productive balance between market forces and positive state action. With the help of case studies from Asia, Latin America, and Africa, we focus on different development strategies adopted, the choice of policy instruments, and methods of implementation. (ECON 0250 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240] or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

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Course Description

Population Economics
In this course we will use an economic perspective to analyze changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in both industrialized and developing countries. We will explore how these changes interact with labor markets, poverty, inequality, urbanization, migration and the status of women using the theoretical and empirical tools of applied economic analysis. Students will engage in data-driven projects to study demographic behavior. Experience with statistical analysis is strongly encouraged. (ECON 0255 or 0240 required; ECON 0211 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021

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Course Description

Trade and Foreign Aid in Latin America
This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of a number of critical issues that currently confront policymakers in Latin America. The topics of development, regionalization and free trade, and the efficacy of foreign aid will be analyzed in the context of Latin American economic development. (ECON 0250, or ECON 0255 or ECON 0240 or IPEC 0240) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR

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Course Description

The Post-Communist Economic Transition
This seminar will use the “natural experiment” of the post-communist transition to better understand the origin and consequences of various economic and political institutions. Drawing on research related to China and Russia as well as other formerly communist economies in Europe and Asia, we will explore such themes as property rights reform, the finance-growth nexus, contract enforcement institutions, and the economic consequences of corruption and different political regimes. (ECON 0210 or MATH 0310 or MATH 0311 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250, or by approval)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP

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Course Description

Economics of the European Union
This course will introduce students to the major economies of Western Europe and also the economic functions and structure of the institutions of the European Union. The course aims to familiarize students with the theoretical economic and policy issues that are currently of concern in the European Union. Moreover, the course aims to analyze economic problems that are of particular relevance to the member states of the European Union, such as the coordination of policies within an intergovernmental supranational framework and how to sustain the integration dynamic. (ECON 0250 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2022

Requirements

EUR

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Course Description

International Trade
Since March 2020 when the world economies went into cascading lockdowns, global trade has been severely impacted. As the global economy slowly opens up, we will answer some age old and some new questions - First, what factors determine flow of international goods and services? Second, how are the gains and losses from international trade distributed amongst nations? Do all benefit, or are some countries made better off at the expense of others? Third, how does trade affect the internal allocation of resources and distribution of income within a country? Fourth, why do national governments try and influence or control international trade flows? Finally, how does international trade affect the low- and middle-income countries in today's global economy especially in the post Covid world? (ECON 0255 or ECON 0344 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

International Finance
An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0250 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Historical Development of the World Economy
Many of the controversies and tensions modern economies have to contend with today, such as growth, inequality, and instability, emerged during the last few centuries. In this seminar we will use economic and historical tools to develop a better understanding of the profound transformations in technology, finance, and international trade over time. We will analyze the challenges the world faced as capital, labor, and commodity markets became rapidly integrated, including financial crises, rising income and wealth inequality, and modernizing policies. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0250 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

History of the Firm
In this course we will trace the history of firms from the Classical Age to the present, using theoretical and empirical economics to understand what makes a “firm,” how firms have been organized throughout history, why firm organization may differ across countries (e.g., early industrial firms in Europe vs. Latin America vs. the United States), and what firm structure implies for economic performance. Our discussion will rely on subfields like institutional economics, development, and finance. Final research papers will evaluate the organizational history of a single firm or the development of firm structures in an industry or country. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255 or ECON 0240 or IPEC 0240; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Special Topics in Environmental Economics
The objective of this seminar is that each student achieves fluency in a set of advanced concepts in environmental economics. The seminar is divided into two main sections. First, we introduce the core theory and policy implications of environmental economics. These include the economics of renewable and non-renewable resources, the theory of externalities and public goods, the Coase theorem, the Ostrom perspective; and sustainability. Second, we study selected topics including the promise and challenges of economic growth, the future of fossil fuels and renewables, and the imperative of climate justice. (ECON 0210 and (ECON 0255 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Environment and Development
Climate change, air pollution, tropical deforestation: there is little doubt that economic development affects, and is affected by, the global and local environment and natural resources. In this course we will explore the complex relationship between environment and development using the theoretical and empirical tools of applied economic analysis. We will begin with pioneering research papers on the empirics of economic growth, examine the macroeconomic evidence, and then move to the micro foundations of the poverty-environment nexus. Major topics will include the resource curse and environmental Kuznets curve hypotheses, approaches for understanding responses to climate variability and disasters in poor communities, management of natural resources in smallholder agriculture, choosing policy instruments for pollution reduction, conservation, and environmental protection, and relationships between human health and the environment. We will conclude with a number of selected topics and issues of contemporary policy relevance. (ECON 0111 (formerly ECON 0210) and ECON 0255 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The International Commodity Business
Civilization has been moving natural resources for commercial purposes for thousands of years. In this course we will study the development of the international commodity trade. The course will look at why humans would move a natural resource from one place to another, addressed through four main areas of inquiry: (1) the innovations which have contributed to global resource trade (commodity extraction, waterborne transport, creation of financial exchanges); (2)  the effects that these commercial imperatives have on developing economies- both positive and negative, with a particular focus on the ‘commodity curse’;  (3)  how the introduction of an imported commodity can fundamentally alter societal behavior; and  (4) the global economics of commodity markets, commodity indexes around the world, and how commercial developments are continually disrupting societies’ demand habits.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2021

Requirements

SOC, WTR

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Electives in Political Science

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship
Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal, but the fundamentals of informed and engaged citizens are difficult to achieve. Power, institutions, information, and culture can each facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action. In this seminar, we will explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship, and employ practical approaches to facilitating deliberation and action in our various communities. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021

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Course Description

The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

African Politics
This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, SAF, SOC

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Course Description

Local Green Politics
How do local communities manage their natural resources? How do they navigate global forces that often work against them? Through systematic comparisons of cases of successful and unsuccessful community resource management efforts, we will assess under what conditions local communities are likely to be successful environmental stewards. The course will draw on experiences from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the USA. Students will compare the cultural contexts in which resource management decisions are made. By the end of the course, students will be expected to describe and critically analyze cases of resource (mis)management. They will also learn to offer solutions to situations of resource mismanagement. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, SOC

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Course Description

International Environmental Politics
What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
This course is an introduction to important themes, concepts, and cases in the study of Middle Eastern and North African politics. We will examine key political issues in the region, focusing primarily on developments since World War II and issues of relevance to the region today. For the purposes of this course, the region is defined as the countries of the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, and Iran. The first half of the course introduces major themes in Middle Eastern politics. These include state development, nationalism, revolution, authoritarian rule, the petro-state, the Arab-Israeli conflict, conflicts in the Persian Gulf, civil conflict, the rise of Islamism, and attempts at liberal reform. The second half of the course examines how these themes have affected political development in a number of key cases. Primary cases include Egypt, Israel, Iran, Morocco, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iraq. Students will have the opportunity to individually assess other countries of personal interest in the region. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, MDE, SOC

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Course Description

What Can I Say? Free Speech v. Racist Speech in the United States and Europe
In this course we will delve into the politics and law surrounding issues of racist speech in the United States and Europe. We will look at the development of speech doctrines in the post-World War Two era, drawing on well-known case studies from American constitutional history, as well as European examples such as the Danish Cartoon Controversy and Holocaust denial cases. Through comparison across time and countries, we will debate the appropriate limits on racist speech in different contexts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1510 or PSCI 1023) 3 hrs. lect./disc (Comparative Politics)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, SOC

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Course Description

Contemporary Chinese Politics
This introductory course provides students with a background in how the party-state political system functions, and then investigates the major political issues in China today. We will focus first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. China is a quickly changing country, so students will focus on analyzing current events but also have an opportunity to explore a topic of interest in more detail. 3 hrs. lect./disc. Comparative Politics

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

AAL, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

West European Politics
In this course we will explore post-WWII European politics. The course is divided into two sections: European political systems and the European Union. In the first section we will analyzes the political institutions of European countries through a comparative approach. We will focus on political parties, identity politics, electoral systems, and systems of government. In the second section we will analyzes the history and institutions of the European Union and discusses important issues and challenges, including enlargement, the eurocrisis, and Brexit. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

EUR, SOC

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Course Description

Soviet and Russian Politics
This course seeks to introduce the student to a major phenomenon of 20th century politics, the rise and decline of the Soviet Union and the emergence of Russia as its successor state. The first part of the course provides an overview of key factors that influenced Russian and Soviet politics under communism, including history, economy, ideology, institutions of the communist party, and the role of political leadership from Lenin to Gorbachev. The second part surveys radical political and social transformations in the 1990s and analyzes Russia's struggle with the twin challenges of democratic and market reform under Yeltsin and Putin. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

EUR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

Central and East European Politics
This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

EUR, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

The Politics of Diversity in Western Europe
Contrary to common perceptions, most West European populations are no longer overwhelmingly white and Christian. The new diversity prompted by post-World War II immigration has generated opportunities and challenges for European societies. In this course, we will examine how ethnic diversity is affecting contemporary West European politics. We will cover the topics of citizenship, immigration, immigrant integration, the rise of far right parties, and state policies toward Europe's new ethnically, racially, and religiously diverse societies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

EUR, SOC

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Course Description

Globalization: Change and Continuity
In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2020

Requirements

CMP, HIS, SOC

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Course Description

International Law
In this course we will analyze how legal principles operate at the international level and how those principles intersect with national laws. We will examine a variety of legal issues and concepts including but not limited to sovereignty, human rights, trade and investment law, use of force, and environmental treaties. Throughout the class, we will pair those issues and concepts with real-world cases. 3 hrs lect. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The Future of Great Power Relations
Will America’s global preeminence endure in the 21st century? Will Russia, Japan, and the European Union decline while other powers grow more influential? In this course we will explore the future global balance of power and prospects for cooperation and conflict among the world’s great powers. Topics include the rise of Brazil, China, and India; the changing nature of American power; the causality of global power shifts and their implications for cooperation or competition on issues such as energy security, cyber security, nuclear nonproliferation, UN Security Council reform, intervention in the Middle East, and Sino-American relations. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Putinism and Contemporary Russian Culture
The 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union was hailed in the West as a triumph of democracy over totalitarianism; for some observers the event even signaled “the end of history.” Today however it seems history is “back,” with Russia under Putin once again assuming its former role as enemy and the “other” of the West. In this course we will seek a better understanding of this apparent reversal of vectors from within Russian culture, while situating it within larger illiberal trends in world politics, by analyzing literary works, popular cinema, political theory, journalism, social media, and other forms of cultural production. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AAL, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

International Politics and WMD
In this course we will examine the international ramifications of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons use. What is a weapon of mass destruction (WMD)? How have WMD changed the way states behave toward international conflicts and within international crises? How has the development of these weapons influenced the policies states have adopted in response? Beyond these questions, major course themes include the threats of proliferation and the highs and lows of weapons reduction initiatives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (not open to students who have taken PSCI 1159) (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

International Diplomacy and Modern South Asia
In this course we will examine current political and economic issues in the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan. We will first examine the background of the South Asian region in general (pre-colonial and colonial eras) and of South Asian countries after independence. We will look at specific interstate and intrastate issues, focusing on the combined quests for political stability and economic development. Students will look at topical issues from the perspective of an officer working in a U.S. Embassy or in a U.S. foreign policy agency. The course will combine rigorous academic understanding of the region with current policy issues. Readings will include both academic studies and contemporary policy/issues papers. This course is equivalent to IGST 0250. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, SOA, SOC

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Course Description

Identity and Conflict in South Asia
In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, SOA, SOC

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Course Description

Politics of India
This course provides students with an introduction to the history and politics of India, one of the most diverse, populous (home to more than one-seventh of the world’s population), and important developing countries in the modern world. This course proceeds chronologically, beginning with ancient Indian (South Asian) civilization, the Mughal Empire of the medieval period, the British colonial experience, Independence, Partition, and contemporary politics, including rising development, as well as the growth of Hindu nationalism. (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, SOA, SOC

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Course Description

The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, CW, SOC

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Course Description

Might and Right Among Nations
What role does justice play in international politics? What role should it play? Does it pay to act justly in the conduct of foreign affairs? In this course, we will examine the place of ethical considerations in international politics. Drawing upon major works of political theory, we will pay special attention to the relationship between justice and necessity, the ethics of war and deception, and plans for perpetual peace. Authors will include Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Kant, Weber, Woodrow Wilson, and Michael Walzer. 3 hrs. lect. (Political Theory)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

EUR, PHL

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Course Description

Comparative Politics of Religion
This course provides students with an introduction to the study of religion in political science. The course is divided into four sections. The first section provides a theoretical background to religion and its study in political science. The second section discusses long-standing debates over the concept of ‘secularization.’ The third section examines the study of religion and democracy, with a special focus on the non-western case of India. The final section explores the effect of religion on political violence, with empirical examples from around the world. The last class explores the future of the study of religion in political science. (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CW

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Course Description

Authoritarian Politics
The purpose of this course is to examine the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes. First, we will define autocracy and consider different forms of authoritarianism and how their leaders come into power. Next, we will investigate why some authoritarian regimes are able to sustain their rule while others collapse. Finally, we will explore how citizens of these regimes bolster, comply with, or revolt against their governments. Throughout the course, adopting a comparative standpoint, we will draw on various country cases. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, CW, SOC

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Course Description

Contentious Politics in Asia
In this course we will compare protest, social mobilization, and contentious politics across Asia. While some have argued that "Asian values" cause harmonious and stable political systems, we will start from the premise that contentious politics in the region reflect the same dynamics seen elsewhere throughout history. However, as with all countries, the specific institutional and cultural context often shapes particular forms of contention. Empirically, we will focus on key regions including East and Southeast Asia as well as the domestic and international dimensions of activism. 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOA, SOC

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Course Description

Political Communication
How are media and communications technology re-shaping politics? From a global comparative perspective—ranging from the United States to Asia—this course will survey the historical development of communications, the role of media in shaping public opinion and behavior, the impact of new media, and the rise of transnational satellite TV. Conceptually, the course will assess the importance of communications for understanding authoritarianism, democracy, and foreign policy. We will develop general comparative frameworks for understanding the growing importance of communications in the information age, while clarifying the limitations of media for shaping polities. (This course is not open to students who have taken PSCI 0413) 3 hrs. lect. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

The Politics of Virtual Realities
How has technology changed our politics? Are those changes all for the good? In this course we will explore the political, legal, and normative implications of the Internet for liberal democracy. We start with the US Constitution and explore arguments that it cannot by itself prevent the Internet from becoming a domain of manipulation rather than of freedom. How can we uphold the ideals of liberty and equality? And, since cyberspace has no country, whose laws should govern it? Cases will include President Obama's campaign and governance strategies, Google's activities abroad, cybersecurity, virtual war, and the WikiLeaks controversy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC

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Course Description

American Foreign Policy
Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Globalization, Terrorism, and Global Insurgency
How does globalization change the nature of terrorism and create a global security environment characterized by a series of hybrid asymmetric threats? What are the connections between organizations, conflict regions, and the developed world? This course will focus on at least four modules that link aspects of globalization to global counterterrorism, counterinsurgency, and counterproliferation policy: 1) migration, immigration, and the movement of people, 2) illicit international markets and financing, 3) global communications, and 4) the connections between international relations, foreign-policy, and political violence worldwide. Skill development will focus on policy evaluation and analysis, oral briefings, collaborative project management, and collaborative policy strategy papers. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The Politics of Taxes
Who gets taxed and how much they get taxed is at least as much a political decision as an economic one. Additionally, the ways governments tax their citizens (and how much they tax them) vary widely between different countries. Moreover, the purpose underlying governments’ use of taxes ranges from fighting inequality to incentivizing various behavioral changes. In this course we will examine sales taxes, wealth taxes, corporate profits, income taxes and the politics around those taxes in a variety of national contexts. (Comparative Politics). 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

CW, SOC

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Course Description

War and Peace
What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, EUR, SOC

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Course Description

The Media and Minorities
In this course we use techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab to examine how the media portray identifiable groups. These techniques enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how different types of groups--such as, for example, immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others--have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will contribute to ongoing publication projects of the lab, and will have the opportunity to pursue their own research topics. Student projects will culminate in research papers that may form the basis for further independent work or for senior theses. 3hrs. seminar (Comparative Politics) (Approval Only)

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

DED, SOC

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Course Description

Comparative Development Strategies
In this course we will explore the topic of development by first analyzing different understandings ranging from improvements in human welfare to economic growth, and then asking why some countries have developed more rapidly than others? Additionally, students will explore the role that governments play in development, such as corruption, patronage, and industrial policy. How can governments help or hinder development prospects? We will address these broad questions by comparatively analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Latin American Revolutions
This course examines the causes, goals, and outcomes of revolutions in twentieth-century Latin America, with special reference to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela, Chile, and Nicaragua. It seeks to understand (1) why this region has experienced multiple revolutions; (2) what their political, economic, or social impact has been; (3) why revolutions produced authoritarian, socialist, dictatorial, or democratic outcomes across countries; and (4) what factors have kept revolutionaries from achieving their political, social, or economic goals. Evaluation entails rigorous application of theory to in-depth case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, SOC

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Course Description

International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice
In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

International Politics of the Middle East
In this course we will study the evolution of the inter-state system in the Middle East. Using contemporary International Relations (IR) theories we will examine the influence of great powers, regional states, transnational movements, and regional organizations on state interests, ideology, religion, and the region's political economy. Questions to be addressed will include: which levels of analyses are most helpful in understanding the complexity of Middle East politics? Which of the IR theories--realist, liberal, or constructivist-- best explain inter-state relations in the region? What other approaches may be useful in this endeavor? 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, MDE, SOC

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Course Description

Gender and International Relations
Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Asymmetric Conflict Research Practicum
The prevalence of civil conflict, asymmetric threats, and global counterterrorism have resulted in the dramatic growth of special operations, security cooperation, and peacebuilding in civil conflict environments. To what extent have we learned the lessons of the post 9/11 world, and to what extent is the global policy community prepared for the asymmetric, embedded, and culturally aware operations that characterize 21st century conflict? Examples will be drawn from around the globe and we will take a comparative approach to conflicts within and across regions, noting their impacts on institutions, policy processes, and human social systems. This course uses the ongoing development of the Special Operations Research Database (SORD) as a platform for learning about global counterterrorism and for students’ training in all phases of research methodology, including fieldwork interviewing techniques. 3 hrs. lect. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Global Trade Politics
In this course we will analyze the politics of international trade through examinations of topics including labor standards, environmental rules, intellectual property, development, foreign policymaking, global power dynamics, multinational corporations, and the WTO. We will use a number of conceptual frameworks such as economic geography and sector/class based analyses. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Who Elected Big Tech?
There is public awareness that technology is delivering unprecedented opportunities while simultaneously undermining privacy, equity, and democratic values. An unprecedented shift in the balance of power between multinational industry and national governments has been a necessary condition for these new challenges. How else could a freely elected American president be silenced by Google, Twitter, and Facebook? How else could Facebook’s Instagram be exposed as knowingly causing harm to teenagers without government penalty? How did America reach the point where Big Tech has the capacity to mount foreign policies? What consequences for social justice follow from that transfer of power in a global economy of multinational companies and diverse workforces? By first exploring these questions together, students will be well prepared for pursuing independent research projects. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, SOC

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Course Description

The Politics of Money and Finance
Governments’ choices on money-related matters deeply affect people’s lives. Stock market crashes, inflation, debt, and unforeseen currency fluctuations can scar society. Conversely, if stock markets, inflation, debt, and currencies are all well-managed, prosperity can be created. One of the central aims of governments across the world is to do just that - manage these issues in order to promote economic growth. In this course, we examine the choices governments face in the pursuit of that and, what leads them to make the choices they do, and what kinds of choices have historically been the most successful. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Seminar on Comparative Democratization
“Why do some countries have democratic institutions while others do not? This seminar explores critical issues concerning democracy and democratization. We seek to address such questions as: What is democracy? What are the main theories of democratization? What factors account for the "third wave" of global democratic expansion? How do newly democratic societies deal with their authoritarian past? What challenges confront countries that are undergoing simultaneously processes of democratic change and economic transformation? What conditions favor/hamper consolidation of new democracies? How do we account for the current democratic backsliding and the antiliberal turn? Is a wave of democratic breakdowns already under way? What role do international actors and factors play? To contend with these (and other) questions, we analyze and compare the experience of many countries and regions.” (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

How Democracies Die
After years of expansion since the end of the cold war, democracy now is in retreat. From young democracies in the developing world to bastions of liberal democracy in Western Europe and North America, democratic political systems are under mounting pressure. What are the fundamental features of this recession? What are the driving forces behind global democratic backsliding? Why do people support autocrats? In this course we will tackle these questions and discuss an array of factors that contribute to global democratic recession including the role of the political elite, failing institutions, eroding norms, and the role of ordinary people. In so doing we will delve deeper into economic and social causes of this decline. Our focus will span from global trends to individual cases such as Venezuela, Turkey, Hungary, India, the United States, and the Philippines. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1544) 3 hrs. Sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

African Government
Sub-Saharan Africa has been described as being in a state of permanent crisis, a place where disorder and chaos reign and states are chronically weak. How do political systems form and thrive under such conditions? What accounts for their survival in the face of tremendous political, economic, and environmental challenges? We will investigate the distinctive characteristics of African political systems, the different governance models throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the types of public goods or public ills these systems have produced. We will also have the opportunity to more deeply appreciate the real-life consequences for displaced Africans through a service-learning component. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, SAF

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Course Description

Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship
Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal, but the fundamentals of informed and engaged citizens are difficult to achieve. Power, institutions, information, and culture can each facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action. In this seminar, we will explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship, and employ practical approaches to facilitating deliberation and action in our various communities. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Political Islam
In this course we will survey the central questions in studies of political Islam, focusing on the emergence of Islam as a political force in the contemporary period. Discussion will center on the following core topics: (1) the nature of political Islam and Islamic interests; (2) how Islamic political movements develop; (3) why Islamic political movements flourish or fail; (4) how Islamic interests are expressed in the political arena; and (5) what types of political systems are most compatible with politicized Islam? These questions will be addressed by looking at the general history of the contemporary Islamic resurgence and by examining case studies on Egypt, Algeria, Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, MDE

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Course Description

Comparative Ethnic Politics
In this seminar we will explore critical questions concerning the impact of ethnic diversity on politics across a wide range of societies. First, we will discuss the construction of ethnic identities, and how these identities are mobilized politically. Second, we will examine the impact of ethnic mobilization on democratic politics. Third, we will look at whether mobilized ethnic identities contribute to an increased likelihood of ethnic conflict. Fourth, we will turn to in-depth case studies to illustrate theories discussed throughout the semester. Students will be able to build upon their own interests through a research paper on a topic of their choosing. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Ethnic Conflict
Experts regard ethnic divides as causing everything from nationalist violence to democratic breakdown to economic stagnation. In this course we will engage the most prominent recent and classic research into the relationship between ethnicity, conflict, and peace. Readings will include leading works in a wide variety of theoretical and empirical traditions, including comparative political science, rational choice, comparative history, sociology, and anthropology. Empirical material includes cases from many parts of the world. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice
Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Leadership: Politics and Personality
What difference do leaders make? Are leaders born or made? What accounts for effective leadership? Do answers to these questions change when the social, cultural, and political context varies? This course will approach the subject of leadership from a multidisciplinary perspective, focusing on (1) the individual personalities and values of leaders; (2) the relationship of leaders to the institutions they serve; (3) the role of the state and cultural context in which the leadership is exercised; and (4) the process of leading. (One course in comparative politics) 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Chinese Political Economy
Over the past 30 years China has undergone a tremendous transition. The purpose of this course is to consider the extent to which China's experience has challenged theories of market reform. First, we will examine the role of the state in Chinese economic development and market systems more broadly. Second, we will analyze challenges in Chinese state-society relations, from public service provision to protest, that have emerged after such rapid economic growth. Finally, we will discuss the political implications of the Chinese state's responses to these issues in terms of authoritarian durability and governance. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

Private and Public Governance in an Era of Globalization
Although the study of international affairs has traditionally focused on states, other actors play important roles in governance. Working alongside the public sector, private actors bring innovative approaches and substantial resources to social problems, but effective collaboration between public and private actors remains elusive. In this seminar we will examine general theories of private and public governance, followed by specific discussion of issues such as economic development, environmental protection, and public health. International Relations

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

The Rise of Asia and US Policy
In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

Euro-Atlantic Relations
In this course we’ll examine the history, current status and future of US-European relations, focusing on transatlantic security issues. The learning process will be entirely virtual and will include lectures, class discussions, a role-playing exercise and a final policy paper. Issues covered include: persistent and changing aspects of the “transatlantic bargain;” US-European relations during the Trump administration and its prospects during the Biden presidency; relations with Russia and China; the Iranian nuclear deal as a transatlantic issue; NATO enlargement issues; relations between NATO and the European Union; British exit from the EU (Brexit); and alternative futures for transatlantic relations. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2021

Requirements

CMP, EUR, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

American Power: Soft, Hard, or Smart
Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, turmoil in the Middle East, and Russian and Chinese expansionist tendencies have raised important questions about how the United States should use power to defend its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since WWII. Using selected case studies, we will examine pro/con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with class debate and discussion, as well as reviews of relevant daily news reports written and presented by class members. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Winter 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, NOR, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Protest Music in Comparative Perspective
In this course we will examine how marginalized populations around the world use music to interpret, explain, and respond to political, racial, socioeconomic, and gendered inequities. Because music is produced for a wide audience, it is important for the construction of group identity and a useful means of protest. We will discuss the domestic politics of countries such as Nigeria, Jamaica, the U.S., and Brazil by reading the literature of comparative politics, sociology, and critical race and gender theory. Our discussion of these topics will help us better understand how power in various forms is used to repress, and how music challenges existing hegemonies. (Comparative Politics)

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

AAL, ART, CMP, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Contemporary Conflicts in the Middle East
The Middle East is known to be one of the most conflict-ridden regions of the world. In this course we explore the contemporary conflicts in the region and the basic motivation of major actors. Specifically, we will study the rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the war in Syria and Yemen. We will study the causes and consequences of these conflicts at the regional and global level. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

AAL, MDE, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

The Politics of Big Technology
What goes on in Silicon Valley and what goes on in Washington D.C. (as well as other capitals) affect each other. The increasing salience of technology in society means that the actions of and reactions to major technology firms have become inescapably political. In this course we will analyze the intersection between big technology firms and politics by examining concerns around privacy, the use of social media for political purposes, technology’s impact on jobs and inequality, and technology firms’ place in geopolitics. (International Relations and foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Adversaries and Allies: Diplomacy in World War II and the Vietnam War
We will examine the diplomacy before and during America's two most traumatic 20th Century wars. We will begin with the diplomatic origins of World War II in Europe, followed by the failed diplomacy between the United States and Japan. Then we will consider negotiations among the Western allied leaders: Roosevelt, Churchill, and Stalin. The final half of the course will cover America's engagement in and escalation of the Vietnam War, and then move to Kissinger's secret negotiations with North Vietnam, as well as the troubled relationship between the U.S. and South Vietnam.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019

Requirements

HIS, WTR

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Course Description

Weapons of Mass Destruction
Technological development has brought human civilization to the point at which we can destroy ourselves in a matter of hours using weapons of mass destruction. What effects do these weapons have on political, and social behavior? Do WMDs deserve their own classification, or is human behavior consistent regardless of the weapon? We explore the technology, political theory and policy that has risen around the prospect of human annihilation. (not open to students who have taken PSCI 0242 or equivalent) (International Relations and Foreign Policy)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2021

Requirements

CMP, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Negotiations that Transformed the 20th Century
Students will explore the historical context, actions of participants, and global consequences of six transformative 20th century negotiations: (1) WWI Versailles Peace Conference, 1919, (2) Munich accord, 1938, (3) U.S.-Japan pre-Pearl Harbor negotiations, 1941, (4) Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962, (5) Vietnam War negotiations, 1969-73, and (6) the Egypt-Israel Camp David Accord, 1978. Besides their historical significance, the six cases provide informative examples of different types of diplomacy: multilateral negotiation, appeasement vs. deterrence, cross-cultural communication, bargaining in a nuclear crisis, inter-ally negotiations, and high-level mediation. We will read historical accounts and participant memoirs, and listen to recordings of participant discussions.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

HIS, SOC, WTR

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Honors Thesis

An International Politics and Economics (IPE) Honors Thesis is undertaken over the course of two terms. Normally, this will be Fall/Winter, or Winter/Spring, though with permission of the advisors it may be Spring/Fall or Fall/Spring. Learn more about the Honors Thesis.

Advanced Placement Credit

All IPEC students must take a minimum of five courses in each department, regardless of credits earned at the secondary school level. Learn more about Advanced Placement.