Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Introduction to Linguistics
In this course we will discuss the major issues and findings in the study of human language within theories of modern linguistics. The main topics include the nature of human language as opposed to other communication systems; sound patterns (phonology); word-formation (morphology); sentence structure (syntax); meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Introduction to Sociolinguistics
In this course, we will explore the ways that language creates and reflects social identities. We will look at the contextual factors-social, cultural, geographical, political, etc.-that impact language use and variation. Themes for this course will include linguistic variation, language and identity, language policy, and language in the media. We will consider questions such as: What distinguishes a language from a dialect? How and why do some language varieties become privileged? How do notions of politeness and respect vary across linguistic contexts? In essence, we will learn how language shapes our world, and how we shape language itself.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Introduction to TESOL
In this course we will study theories and methods in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and abroad. We will look at the basic building blocks of the grammatical and pronunciation systems of English and explore different teaching techniques. We will examine curricular resources used with adolescent and adult learners, and develop materials applicable to a variety of classroom settings. Class sessions will be largely hands-on and will include practice student teaching demonstrations with peer feedback. (Not open to students who have taken LNGT/EDST 1003)

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Winter 2022

Requirements

WTR

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Course Description

Language, Culture and Society
In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

English Grammar: Concepts and Controversies
In this course we will study the structure of the English language, learning key terms and strategies for analyzing English syntax. We will explore English grammar from both prescriptive and descriptive perspectives and examine its relevance to language policy, linguistic prejudice, and English education. Readings will be drawn from a variety of texts, including Rhetorical Grammar (2009), Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2006), Language Myths (1999), and Origins of the Specious (2010). This course is relevant to students wanting to increase their own knowledge of the English language, as well as to those seeking tools for English teaching and/or research.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Language Structure and Function
In this course we will discuss the major issues and findings in the study of human language within theories of modern linguistics, which shares a history with mid-century American anthropology. The main topics include the nature of human language in comparison with other communication systems; sound patterns (phonology); word-formation (morphology); sentence structure (syntax); meaning (semantics); use (pragmatics); language acquisition and socialization. We will also consider language variation and the historical development of languages. Instruction is in English but examples will be drawn from less commonly studied languages around the world. (not open to students who have taken LNGT 0101) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SOC

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Course Description

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English)
This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

NOA

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Course Description

The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology
In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SCI

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Course Description

Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021

Requirements

AAL, MDE, SOC

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Course Description

The Nature and Origin of Language
This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

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Course Description

History of the French Language
In this course we will study how French has evolved into a global language. We will survey its development from a Latin dialect spoken in ancient Gaul to its present-day diversity in the French-speaking world, with a focus on comparative analysis. Specific topics may include linguistic variation over time, gender and language change, phonological history, spelling reforms, and language use on social media. Students will engage with historical and contemporary texts, art, and audiovisual sources. (FREN 0209, or by waiver. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, HIS, LNG

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Course Description

The Non-Native Speaker in a Multilingual World
In this course we will address linguistic, educational, and ideological dimensions of the non-native speaker identity and multilingual societies. What does it mean to be a non-native speaker? Why is this linguistic identity considered by some to be a stigma and by others to be a privilege? How do societies succeed in and fail at integrating speakers of different languages? In which ways do language policies and educational practices in the United States and around the world reflect linguistic and social realities? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

How Languages are Learned: Theories and Implications
In this course we will develop a nuanced understanding of the cognitive, social, and educational factors that enable humans to acquire second languages. What is the difference between first and second language acquisition? How can instruction and curriculum be optimized to help learners? How are languages acquired in naturalistic settings? What is the impact of technology on language education? How do ideologies impact bilingual education in the United States and beyond? 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

The Structure of Language: Introduction to Morphology and Syntax
In this course we will focus on two fundamental areas in the study of language structure: morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts (e.g., roots and affixes), whereas syntax studies how words are combined to form larger units (phrases and sentences). Linguistic data for illustration and analysis will be taken both from English and a variety of languages belonging to different language families to help us better understand the unity and diversity of human language with regard to word and sentence structure. The course is intended to enhance students’ skills in linguistic description and analysis, as well as general problem-solving and analytical reasoning skills.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

DED, WTR

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Course Description

Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English)
Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, NOA, SOC

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Course Description

Semantics, Logic, and Cognition
Using logical and mathematical tools, formal semantics answers the following questions: Why do sentences mean what they mean? How is reasoning possible? How does language structure our understanding of time, change, knowledge, morality, identity, and possibility? We will evaluate several formal-semantic models from philosophical, linguistic, and psychological perspectives. This course is well suited for students interested in computer science, linguistics, logic, mathematics, neuroscience, philosophy, or psychology. (Some prior familiarity with formal logic is recommended, but not required.) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

DED, PHL

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Course Description

Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation
In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

LNG

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Course Description

The Holocaust and Exile in Translation
Readers across the globe have learned about the atrocities of the Holocaust through translation. Translators have transferred testimonials about concentration camps, exile, and resistance into many languages. In this course, we study how translators have shaped this vibrant literature according to the priorities of different cultural communities. Combining theory and praxis, we analyze the multilingual journeys of influential works such as The Diary of Anne Frank through a translation studies lens. Students will also translate texts from various genres including autobiography, children’s and young adult literature, and subtitle testimonial footage. (Advanced skills in one language in addition to English required). 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CMP, EUR

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Course Description

Variation and Change in Japanese (In English)
What can linguistic change tell us about human cognition and behavior? How does the notion of “politeness” vary across communities? How do speakers of Japanese perform gender and other social identities? In this course we will address linguistic diversity and dynamism by examining the Japanese language. Topics include workplace discourse and change in honorific systems. Employing classic works in linguistics and addressing contemporary cultural materials such as manga and J-drama we will apply theoretical frameworks from (socio-)pragmatics, historical linguistics and linguistic typology to gain a deeper understanding of how and why Japanese has developed to its present forms and uses. Students with an interest in linguistics, or in teaching and learning language, or science in general, may also enjoy the analytical approach. (No prerequisites. JAPN0103 above or equivalent recommended). Heritage speakers are also welcome. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

NOA, SOC

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Course Description

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The course’s goals are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. We will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), as well as the history and sociolinguistic variation of the Spanish language, as spoken in communities in Europe, Latin America, and Northern America. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs, illustrating these linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2021

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

French Language and Society
In this course we will study the relationship between the French language and French-speaking societies. Sociolinguistic approaches will be used to explore how geography, class, ethnicity, and gender influence dialectal, lexical, and phonological variation. We will examine how language contact with regional and minority languages affects language use and development. Materials will include scholarly publications, speech samples, social media, and films. Students will learn how to build and analyze surveys, and will practice presenting their research at professional venues. (At least two FREN courses above 0209, or by waiver. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

EUR, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Philosophy of Language
Speaking a language is a complex form of behavior that plays a rich and varied role in human life. The philosophy of language seeks to give a philosophical account of this phenomenon, focusing on such questions as: How does language gain meaning? How does it differ from animal communication? Is language in some sense innate? Other topics to be addressed include: theories of reference and truth; the relation between language, thought, and reality; and theories of metaphor. Readings from philosophers and linguists will include works by Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, and Pinker. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver; PHIL 0180 is also strongly recommended)3 hrs lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

PHL

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Course Description

German Linguistics (in German)
This course simultaneously presents an overview of the major subfields of linguistics as they apply to the German language and a discussion of how today's Standard German evolved. We will pay attention to important concepts in phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. In addition to these theoretical and descriptive aspects, we will discuss sociolinguistic issues such as language and gender and regional variations within Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Luxemburg. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in German. (Formerly GRMN 0340) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

EUR, LNG

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Course Description

Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World
What does it mean to be bilingual? In this course we will study bilingualism with a special emphasis on Spanish-speaking bilinguals in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Course topics will include social, political, linguistic, and psychological aspects of bilingualism. Special attention will be paid to societal bilingualism, language use among a group or community, individual bilingualism, how an individual’s language use changes in different contexts and throughout an individual’s lifespan, and government and educational policies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will study texts, speech samples, and media that highlight different aspects of bilingualism. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Linguistic Variation
In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019

Requirements

CMP

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Course Description

Language and the Environment
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Linguistic Anthropology Methods
In this course we will work with a method and theory known as the “ethnography of communication” to examine language use in socio-cultural context. Students will learn to form research questions and collect different kinds of data, including everyday spoken interactions, archival print sources, and social media. Students will learn how to document, annotate, and analyze their samples as speech events linked to broader discursive contexts and social relations. Students will also turn ethnography of communication upon social science research itself, examining interviews and surveys as communicative interactions. The course provides an empirical pathway to questions of cultural difference and social inequality. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World
What does it mean to be bilingual? In this course we will study bilingualism with a special emphasis on Spanish-speaking bilinguals in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Course topics will include social, political, linguistic, and psychological aspects of bilingualism. Special attention will be paid to societal bilingualism, language use among a group or community, individual bilingualism, how an individual’s language use changes in different contexts and throughout an individual’s lifespan, and government and educational policies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will study texts, speech samples, and media that highlight different aspects of bilingualism. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) (not open to students who have taken SPAN/LNGT 0377) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, LNG, SOC

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Course Description

Spanish in the US
Aside from Mexico, there are more Spanish speakers in the US than in any other country. In this seminar we will explore various facets of Spanish-speaking populations in the US, including, but not limited to, linguistic aspects (e.g. Spanglish, Mock Spanish, Latinx English), and the use and reception of Spanish in public spaces (e.g. literature, television, music). Fundamentally, we will consider the diversity of Spanish speakers in the US and myths about them and the language(s) they speak. In addition to conducting original research, students will engage in community outreach in order to help dispel polemic stereotypes. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, LNG, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Arabic Diglossia: A Linguistic Approach
Diglossia is an intricate sociolinguistic situation in which two related varieties of the same language co-exist within the same speech community. In this course we will focus on the study of diglossia as manifested in Arabic-speaking communities, where Modern Standard Arabic is used side by side with Vernacular Arabic. In particular, we will discuss the linguistic differences between the two varieties, their distinct and overlapping functions, their status in society, and code-switching between them in various contexts of language use. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including articles and book chapters, print and non-print media, political and religious discourse, and literary texts. The language of instruction is exclusively Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AAL, LNG, MDE, SOC

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Course Description

Language and the Environment
Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Independent Work
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Introduction to Translation Studies
Combining theory and praxis, this course is geared towards students with an advanced knowledge of modern languages (300-level and above) who are contemplating a career in translation. During the first part of the course in the lecture/discussion format, we will analyze key concepts of translation studies such as Katharina Reiss’ and Hans Vermeer’s “skopos theory” and Lawrence Venuti’s “the translator’s invisibility.” We will also explore political and ideological influences on translation, specifically gender. Throughout the course, students will be required to translate different non-literary texts into their native languages and present their translations in class. Not open to students who have taken LNGT 1001.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2021, Winter 2022, Winter 2023

Requirements

WTR

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Course Description

Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course, we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating engaging visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, we will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will work in small groups with one of several faculty members on domain-specific research projects in Geography, Linguistics, Political Science, or Writing & Rhetoric. This course will use the R programming language. No prior experience with R is necessary.

GEOG: Students will apply data science tools to explore the geography human-environment relationships around protected areas. We will use household survey and land cover data from locations across the humid tropics where the Wildlife Conservation Society has been tracking human wellbeing and forest resource use in high-priority conservation landscapes. Projects and visualizations will be presented back to WCS to inform their ongoing monitoring and management in these sites.

LNGT: In this section, we will learn how to collect and analyze Twitter data in R. We will focus on social metrics and geographical locations to examine language variation in online communities across the United States. While the emphasis will be placed on linguistics, the statistical and analytical tools will help you work with other types of Twitter corpora in the future.

PSCI: Students will use cross-national data to explore relationships between conflict events and political, social, and economic factors in each nation. What factors contribute to conflict and violence? Our focus will be to find patterns in the data using the tools in R and discuss what those patterns suggest for addressing rising conflict and resolving ones that have already experienced violence.

WRPR: Students will learn to conduct writing studies research through working with "big data” from a multiyear survey of first-year college students about their academic confidences, attitudes, and perceptions. We will explore how educational access, identity, and language background impacts survey responses. Using statistical analysis and data visualizations, as well as writing, we will report our findings.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021, Winter 2023

Requirements

DED, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Mayan Language Revitalization
This course is specifically designed for students accompanying Professor Baird to Guatemala in January 2020. Students will spend the first week of the term on campus where they will learn about language revitalization strategies, the social and historic context of contact between Spanish and Mayan languages and cultures, and receive a brief introduction to the Mayan language K’ichee’. Afterwards, students will travel to Guatemala in order to collaborate with locals in a language revitalization campaign. This collaboration will include the planning and production of national radio programs, visits to local schools, and the creation and dissemination of materials. Only students that have met all of the requirements may enroll in this class. Requirements include at least 1 previous course in Spanish (300 and above), and participation in all required meetings during the Fall 2019 semester. Please note: This course had to be pre-enrolled because of the substantial planning and logistics involved. The course is therefore already full. However, students interested in this topic or in pursuing future research in this area should contact Prof. Baird to inquire about opportunities. (Approval only)

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, LNG, SOC, WTR

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