Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Society and the Individual
This course examines the ideas and enduring contributions of the giants of modern social theory, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Sigmund Freud. Readings will include selections from original works, as well as contemporary essays. Key issues will include the nature of modernity, the direction of social change, and the role of human agency in constructing the "good society." This course serves as a general introduction to sociology. (formerly SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Gender and the Body
What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. (formerly SOAN 0191) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Labor
In this class we will survey the sociological literature on labor and labor movements in America and around the world. We will raise questions related to the organization and transformation of work, the making of class society, trade unionism and other class-based organizing, and the impact of globalization on labor organizations. Exploration of these key themes will happen through an analysis of classic and contemporary texts, as well as fiction and film. This is a seminar-style course with opportunities for students to lead class discussions and debates. (formerly SOAN 0201) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Environmental Sociology
In this course we will explore the complex relations between society and the environment. First, we will examine the globalized dominant understanding of "nature" in the Modern era as well as alternatives to this conception. Second, we will explore environmental problems, looking at the interrelationship between social inequality and environmental inequality, power, social justice movements, and governance, including topics such as agrifood systems, biodiversity, public health, energy, climate change, water use, and indigenous knowledge. We will examine these themes using key theories and inquiry from sociologists, historians, philosophers, activists, and geographers, among others. Students own environmental concerns will provide important contributions to this course. Not open to students who have taken SOAN 0308. (formerly SOAN 0209) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The Family in Contemporary Society
This course will investigate the social, economic, and political forces that have brought about changes in family life in the beginning of the 21st century. We will begin by looking at various attempts to define "the family," and we will then explore a range of topics, including the webs of family relationships (e.g., mothering, fathering, kin networks), labor and family intersections (e.g., mediating between work and family; the household division of labor), gay and lesbian family life, and domestic violence. Although the focus will be on contemporary United States, we will also examine some cross-cultural and historical material. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Education
In this course we will study education both as a social institution and as a social process. In our analysis of education and its relationship to the structure of society, we will pay particular attention to the intersection of gender, class, race, and ethnicity within schools. Our objective will be to explore the ways in which education might contribute to the reproduction of social inequalities, as well as its potential for social change. The substantive focus will be on American society. (formerly SOAN 0215) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Sport
In this course we will explore sport-related issues and sport-society issues from a sociological perspective. Through lectures, films, class discussions, and student presentations we will examine the roles of sport within contemporary social systems, and ways in which sport reflects and enhances individual, collective, and national agendas and identities. We will also critically analyze various topics, including violence, cheating, and technology while focusing on “mega sporting events,” the media, and eSport. Additionally, by using sport as a lens to examine class, gender, and race we will illuminate the manners in which sport is entangled in socio-cultural, political, and economic forces. This course is part of the Public Humanities Labs Initiative administered by the Axinn Center for the Humanities. (formerly SOAN 0218) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Contemporary Israel: The Politics of Ethnic Difference
The course explores the politics of ethnic difference in Israel through a combined historical-sociological perspective, using diverse textual and visual materials. After tracing the origins of the ethnic categories of “Ashkenazi” (Western) and Mizrachi (Middle Eastern/North African) Jews, we examine the history of immigration to Israel in the 1950s, considering how ethnicity came to define class and geography. In subsequent units, we will deal with Mizrachi protest movements such as the Israeli 1970s “Black Panthers” and the more recent trend of Mizrachi intellectuals to reclaim the “Arab-Jew” identity, and in comparison, the Mizrachi traditional support of hawkish positions regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In the concluding units, we will utilize comparative tools to conceptualize this internal Jewish dynamic.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, MDE, SOC

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Course Description

The City and Its People
We all live somewhere, and increasingly we find ourselves living in an urban environment. In this course we will explore current topics in urban sociology, with particular emphasis on the power of place, culture, and community in U.S. cities. We will study the historical, cultural, and political conditions that have shaped contemporary U.S. cities, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. We will examine how cities change and resist change through the lens of such subjects as migration, poverty, urban arts, crime, and education as it pertains to the city. Students will read a variety of ethnographic and sociological materials, in order to gain an understanding of the complexities of both urban life and processes of representation. (formerly SOAN 0235) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Visual Sociology
We live in a visual world. To understand society and culture, we must understand the images we produce and consume. This course provides a sociological lens to study how we use and are used by images. We will study key theories that frame how visual contents (such as photographs, films, and videos) are shared, viewed, and interpreted by various audiences. Using images as our starting point, we will analyze the messages and imagery in visual texts to extract their social meanings. We will engage three sides of visual sociology: images as cultural artifacts, picture making as data collection, and displaying research visually. (Sociology) (Juniors and Seniors by permission only) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Inequality and the American Dream
In this course we will explore sociological attempts to explain who “gets ahead” in the contemporary United States. We will discuss two distinct issues that are often conflated in public discussions: economic inequality and social mobility. We will consider the conceptual and empirical associations between these measures, how each has changed over time, how the United States compares to other countries, and how different social environments (such as colleges, neighborhoods, and families) influence life chances within and across generations. We will also examine the challenges of producing research about these topics, focusing on both theoretical and methodological issues. (formerly SOAN 0240) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, SOC

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Course Description

Social Life in an Age of Big Data
Until recently, quantitative social science relied on surveys or official statistics. Today, sociologists may link social media profiles to census records or student loan statements. In this course, we will consider some of the insights that such sources and methods of "Big Data" reveal about society. We will also critically examine the ethical dilemmas and cultural consequences of living in a world where many of our actions and interactions can be turned into data. Readings, discussions and occasional applied exercises will introduce students to core sociological topics and develop the tools to consume and engage quantitative social science research. (formerly SOAN 0245) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

DED, SOC

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Course Description

Social Psychology in Sociology
The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between self and society from a sociological perspective. Our initial focus will on the nature of symbols, language, and the social self as theorized by G. H. Mead and early "symbolic interactionists." We will then address the presentation of self through the works of Erving Goffman, and subsequently consider more contemporary concerns, such as emotions, emotional labor, and inequality in social interaction. The second half of the course will address questions of identity and debates surrounding the emergence of "postmodern" selves. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Globalizing Gender
In this course we will explore gender and the process of gendering as a complex and evolving global phenomenon of the 21st century. The readings will focus on the politics and experience of gender and sexualities in various parts of the world, including India, Pakistan, Muslim minorities in South Asia, and among diasporic communities in Europe and the United States. Through lectures and small group discussions, we will critique and analyze themes including third gender, masculinity, changing practices of marriage, the politics of sexuality, and the impact of the women’s movement, and gay rights movement on existing understanding of gendered traditions. (National/Transnational Feminisms) (formerly SOAN 0261) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Genders and Sexualities in the US
In this course we will explore and examine how genders and sexualities are constructed and the implications that such constructions have on individuals and societies. We will examine the theories, concepts, practices, and beliefs about sex, gender, sexuality, and sexual identity and explore how these concepts are different between different groups and how they have changed over time, specifically using an intersectional lens. Students will be encouraged to discuss intricacies of their own sexual and gender identities and how these statuses may impact their social status and their relationships with others and the larger society. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Men and Masculinities
In this course we will consider the creation and performance of masculinities in the American context. We will ask how masculinity is constructed and how concepts of masculinity intersect with class, race, sexuality, and nation. Topics will include: The construction of idealized notions of masculinity in opposition to both femininities and subordinated masculinities; depictions of masculinity in the media; male socialization and boyhood; the workplace, family life and fatherhood; trans and gender queer masculinities; men’s health; men as perpetrators and victims of violence; and explicitly male-focused social movements and subcultures (such as pro-feminist men; Men’s Rights Activism; Pick-Up artists, Incels).

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Global Flows: The Causes, Dynamics, and Consequences of International Migration
Whether they are asylum seekers, undocumented or legal migrants, large-scale movements of people across international borders raises important questions about human rights, nationality, and place. This global flow also presents unique challenges to both newcomers and residents of the receiving society as both sides contend with issues of loyalty, belonging, and identity. In this course we will examine these important issues using the United States as the primary (though not exclusive) context. Drawing upon historical and contemporary material, we will also discuss the social, cultural, political, and economic consequences of global migration.(formerly SOAN 0274) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Modern Antisemitism
In this course, we will explore modern antisemitism from a sociological perspective. Drawing on theories and empirical research from sociology and related fields, we will analyze the logic of antisemitic narratives, how antisemitism differs from other forms of racism, how antisemitism has changed after the Holocaust, whether antisemitism and anti-Zionism are related phenomena, and how prevalent antisemitic attitudes and discrimination remain today. We will also explore what role antisemitism plays in contemporary conspiracy theories and far-right movements but also whether there are forms of antisemitism specific to the Left. Overall, we will consider how to integrate an analysis of antisemitism into contemporary theories of racism, such as Intersectionality or Critical Whiteness. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Deviance and Social Control
This course will introduce students to sociological perspectives on the nature, causes and control of deviant behavior and populations. We will consider, historically and theoretically, the construction of deviance, the social purpose it serves, and the societal response deviance engenders. We will pay special attention to the ways in which the deviant body is constructed and managed through a variety of frameworks – including medical, punitive and therapeutic - and reflect critically on the social and political ramifications of the categorizations “deviant” and “normal”. (formerly SOAN 0288) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, SOC

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Course Description

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 03010) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SOC

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Course Description

Social Theory
This course provides an overview of major lines of development in 20th century social theory relevant to the field of sociology, focusing on how various theorists have grappled with the basic issues that have dominated 20th century social thought. Particular attention will be given to the questions arising from the conceptual distinctions between structure and action, on the one hand, and identity and culture, on the other. How is social order possible? How autonomous are human agents? How do we explain the persistence of observed patterns of human interaction and social practice? How do we analyze relations between the world of everyday life and the large-scale development of social systems? How does social change take place? (SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 0305) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Social Movements and Collective Action
An analysis of the range of factors which influence the emergence and development of social protest, social movements, rebellion, and revolution. Topics to be considered include: the generation and mobilization of discontent; recruitment and participation; member commitment; tactics and strategy; revolutionary situations and outcomes; collective violence; and the factors that influence the success and failure of movement organizations and collective action in general. Emphasis will be placed on critically analyzing alternative approaches and theories of social movements and collective action (i.e., self-interest/deprivation, participation gratification, traditional collective behavior and resource mobilization). Empirical studies will be used throughout the course. Limited places available for students to satisfy the College writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

White People
White people did not just appear out of nowhere. Instead, they are the result of a long history of structural and everyday racism that was always intertwined with class, sex, sexuality, and nation. We will explore how whiteness became a foundational category for citizenship in the US, especially after the Civil War when the Color Line was drawn through the legal, cultural, and spatial practices of Jim Crow. We will consider how "new immigrants" and even white "trash" became white primarily through the exclusion of Black Americans. Finally, we will look at the formation of whiteness today as a site of privilege, aggrieved entitlement, and violence. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. (formerly SOAN 0314) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Theories of Celebrity
In this course we will explore the cultural significance of the concept "celebrity" from a variety of theoretical perspectives. We will draw from a range of examples, including the history of Hollywood, the branding of sport stars, the rise of reality television, YouTube fame, and celebrity gossip, to examine the structures of power and inequality the celebrity phenomenon and its commodification embody. We will use theoretical concepts such as hegemony, the spectacle, mechanical reproduction, the panopticon, hyperreality, microcelebrity, postmodernity, and neoliberalism to analyze the extraordinary rise of a visual culture based on the production and consumption of celebrity. (SOCI 0105 or SOCI 0288) (Formerly SOAN 0281 and SOAN 0318) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, SOC

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Course Description

The Idea of Drugs and Addiction
Drugs cause panic and social hysteria. We spend time talking about them and expend energy distinguishing between good and bad drugs and users. Movies, documentaries, literature, art, and television shows reflect this preoccupation with the use and misuse of drugs. In this course we will investigate the social significance of “drugs” as a cultural, rather than pharmacological, category. We will consider drugs and addiction as ideas that reflect concerns about the “self” in modernity. We will examine the panic surrounding drug use and addiction, our preoccupation with treatment, and our emphasis on sobriety. Overall, we will engage with the larger themes the idea of drugs and addiction raises: harm, exclusion, inequality, pleasure, freedom, desire, perfection, enlightenment, and control. 3hrs. lect./disc. (SOAN 0105 or SOCO 0105 or SOAN 0288 or SOCI 0288)

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Higher Education and Society
Concerns about quality, value, and cost have raised doubts about whether higher education remains a pathway to opportunity. In this course we will consider these issues by reviewing research on the changing demographics of students, the evolving definition of “merit” in admissions, the challenges of assessing what students learn, and the relationship between student loan debt and economic inequality. We will also examine how college shapes later outcomes such as income, health, and family formation. Finally, we will discuss efforts to reform higher education and the potential for innovations like global expansion to reshape postsecondary schooling in the future. 3 hrs.lct. (Formerly SOCI 0430. Not open to students who have already taken SOCI 0430.)

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

The Long Civil Rights Movement
The Civil Rights Movement is one of the most significant political forces in American history, but too often we reduce it to its heyday in the 1950s and 60s. In this course we engage a much longer, more varied history of African American freedom struggles, from protests against segregated trains in the late 19th century to today’s #BlackLivesMatter. We use social movement theory to explore these cases, and use the cases to develop new theories of politics and social structure, paying close attention to the roles of organizations, resources, leadership, recruitment, commitment, values, ideology, culture, gender, and counter-movements. (SOCI 0105, or permission) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Education and Social Policy
School choice programs like charter and magnet schools are dramatically altering the educational landscape in the United States. In this course we will examine the premise that we can overcome the challenges of children living in poor neighborhoods by severing the traditional link between neighborhoods and schools and by providing access to extralocal high-quality schools. But who gets to exercise such choice? Does school choice result in better educational outcomes? We will also explore the relationship between school and neighborhood inequality. How do these two contexts work together to reproduce, intensify, or ameliorate spatial and educational inequities? (formerly SOAN 0351) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

The Continuing Significance of Race in the United States
This course will introduce students to theories of race and racism in the United States, how racial categories are formed and maintained in a variety of social arenas, and how race and racism influence social systems. In order to demonstrate the prevalence of race and racism in the U.S., the course will be a “topics” course in that each week, we will explore a different topic (such as education, crime, gender) and examine how they are influenced by race and racism. In addition, the course will compare and contrast the experiences of different racial and ethnic groups in the United States and examine how these different experiences influences the way they are seen, how they see themselves, and how they interact with other groups. Upon completion of the course, students will have a better understanding of the historic and contemporary significance of race and how race influences our everyday interactions in multiple different social arenas. (formerly SOAN 0356) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Digital Sociology
We live in a digital world. We surf. We tweet. We swipe left. We create data. We become data. In this course we will consider how we use and are used by digital technologies. Digital spaces are neither neutral nor separate; they reflect and recreate the “real world.” We will critically examine today’s technologies and practices using central concepts in sociological theory, namely identity, inequality, and power. We will focus on four main topics: social media and productive labor; surveillance and privacy; stratification in access, use, and experience across race, class, gender, and sexuality; and online political organizing. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Documentary Sociology
In this course we will consider how documentaries can bring the “sociological imagination” to life by using video and audio to link individual troubles with social issues and personal biography with historical context. Through readings and viewings, we will spend the first third of the class discussing the potential and limitations of the documentary form to illustrate sociological concepts. Students will develop a proposal for their own short video or audio documentary that they will then work on throughout the semester. Students must be willing to spend significant time outside of class on their documentary and to provide constructive feedback on each other’s developing projects in class. The course will culminate in a public presentation of the finished projects. No prior experience or coursework in video or audio production is required. (SOCI 0105; open to SOAN majors or by instructor approval) 3 hr. sem,

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Mental Health
Mental illness is often defined in biological or psychological terms. Sociologists, however, argue that the concept of mental illness is also socially constructed. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the sociological approaches used to understand mental health and illness. In this course we will cover topics like the medicalization and stigmatization of mental illness, as well as the social-structural (e.g., social class, gender, race, family structure) determinants of stress and mental health. Lastly, we will explore issues related to mental health systems, treatments, and policies. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Politics of Identity
In this course we will introduce students to social diversity in the U.S. as it is reflected in four master identities: class, gender, race, and sexuality. We will examine what these identities mean for group membership, how group membership is attained or ascribed and maintained. Using both historical and contemporary materials, we will explore how identities have developed over time and how they have been challenged. In addition, we will examine how multiple identities intersect and the implications of these intersections have on individual identities. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Social Statistics
In this course we will learn the practical tools social sociologists and other scientists use to analyze data quantitatively. Topics will emphasize applications with statistical software and data from the General Social Survey and other datasets. We will explore methods to describe statistics about samples, apply the principles of probability to make predictions about populations, and estimate the significance of those predictions through inference and hypothesis testing. We will conclude with an introduction to linear regression. (Open only to majors or by Instructor Approval) (formerly SOAN 0385) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

DED, SOC

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Course Description

Sex and Society
In this seminar we will explore the pleasures, power, and problems of sex and will place sexuality in dynamic interaction with larger social issues. It is impossible to understand sexuality as separate from other dimensions of the human condition such as economics, politics, work, family, race, and gender. In particular, we will examine questions related to the science of sex, morality, monogamy, sex work, power and domination, desire and fantasy, and sexual politics. Overall, students will gain an understanding of sexuality as a social phenomenon. (formerly SOAN 0402) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Sociology of the Pandemic
In this seminar students will conduct original sociological research on the COVID-19 pandemic. We will also examine the ways that sociological theory and other materials—films, news reports, journalism, social media, etc—can help us understand the disruptive social, political, economic, and cultural changes brought on by the current crisis. Students will pursue their own projects or work in groups, and will work collectively as a class to help each other examine the sociological dimensions of the pandemic. Topics might include the impacts on labor and work issues, family dynamics, inequality, education, and the intersections with race, class, and gender. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Documentary Sociology
In this course we will consider how documentaries can bring the “sociological imagination” to life by using video and audio to link individual troubles with social issues and personal biography with historical context. Through readings and viewings, we will spend the first third of the class discussing the potential of the short documentary form to illustrate sociological concepts. Students will develop a proposal for their own short video documentary that they will then work on throughout the semester. Students must be willing to spend significant time outside of class on their documentary and to provide constructive feedback on each other’s developing projects in class. No prior experience or coursework in video or audio production is required. (SOCI 0105; open to SOCI majors or by instructor approval) (formerly SOCI 0364). 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Subcultures
Whether based on music and style (punk, emo, hip hop), physical activities (skateboarding, surfing, parkour) or pop culture fandom, networks of (young) people regularly are labelled as subcultures. In this course, we will examine subcultures based on sociological and ethnographic materials. We will discuss who participates in subcultures and who is excluded (on the basis of class, race, gender, sexuality); whether subcultures are inherently resistant and what distinguishes them from social movements; and whether the concept of subculture holds up under contemporary processes of globalization, digitalization and post-modernization or in geographic settings beyond urban centers.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Sociology of Punishment
In this course, we will examine the changing ideologies and practices of state-sponsored punishment that have led to the spectacular expansion of imprisonment and other forms of penal supervision in the U.S. Drawing on theoretical accounts of punishment, historical examinations of prison and parole, and contemporary studies of criminal law and sentencing, we will consider social control as it plays out via institutionalized contexts, namely prisons and asylums, as well as alternative sanctions, such as coerced treatment. We will identify the major phases of penal development and consider mass imprisonment as both a reflection and cause of racial and economic inequality. (SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105 or SOAN 0288 or SOCI 0288 ) (formerly SOAN 0478) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2020

Requirements

AMR, NOR, SOC

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Course Description

Topics in Sociological Practice
In this project-based course, we will use tools of data analysis and digital methods to explore sociological research topics and communicate findings. We will review examples of public social science such as the Opportunity Atlas, Social Explorer, and the Open Policing Project. Through readings and workshops, we will reflect on how these forms create challenges and opportunities related to data ethics, principles of data visualization, and digital pedagogy. Students will build on their previous coursework to develop interactive websites that can be integrated throughout the department's curricula. Students will extensively use programs such as R and Datawrapper but no previous experience with these tools is required. (Open to Sociology majors) (SOCI 0105) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

SOC

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Course Description

Prior to registering for SOCI 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Sociology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

One-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Multi-Semester Senior Project
Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Counting the U.S.: The 2020 Census
In 2020 the government will count each resident of the United States as part of the constitutionally-mandated decennial census. In this course we will consider the importance and challenges of the census for measuring trends in sociological topics such as education, inequality, family composition, and race. Students will develop their skills in quantitative social science research by completing an independent project using census data. The class may also collaborate with local community organizations to use census data to identify how and where to provide services. Previous experience with the software package R is helpful, but not required.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

DED, SOC, WTR

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Course Description

Data Science Across Disciplines
In this course, we will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline—obtaining and cleaning large and messy data sets, exploring these data and creating engaging visualizations, and communicating insights from the data in a meaningful manner. During morning sessions, we will learn the tools and techniques required to explore new and exciting data sets. During afternoon sessions, students will work in small groups with one of several faculty members on domain-specific research projects in Sociology, Neuroscience, Animation, Art History, or Environmental Science. This course will utilize the R programming language. No prior experience with R is necessary.
ENVS: Students will engage in research within environmental health science—the study of reciprocal relationships between human health and the environment. High-quality data and the skills to make sense of these data are key to studying environmental health across diverse spatial scales, from individual cells through human populations. In this course, we will explore common types of data and analytical tools used to answer environmental health questions and inform policy.
FMMC: Students will explore how to make a series of consequential decisions about how to present data and how to make it clear, impactful, emotional or compelling. In this hands-on course we will use a wide range of new and old art making materials to craft artistic visual representations of data that educate, entertain, and persuade an audience with the fundamentals of data science as our starting point.
NSCI/MATH: Students will use the tools of data science to explore quantitative approaches to understanding and visualizing neural data. The types of neural data that we will study consists of electrical activity (voltage and/or spike trains) measured from individual neurons and can be used to understand how neurons respond to and process different stimuli (e.g., visual or auditory cues). Specifically, we will use this neural data from several regions of the brain to make predictions about neuron connectivity and information flow within and across brain regions.
SOCI: Students will use the tools of data science to examine how experiences in college are associated with social and economic mobility after college. Participants will combine sources of "big data" with survey research to produce visualizations and exploratory analyses that consider the importance of higher education for shaping life chances.
HARC: Students will use the tools of data science to create interactive visualizations of the Dutch textile trade in the early eighteenth century. These visualizations will enable users to make connections between global trade patterns and representations of textiles in paintings, prints, and drawings.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

DED, SOC, WTR

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