Courses

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Visual Creativity for Stage
Students will develop an understanding of color, line, form, shape, texture, and balance as they apply to historical and current theatrical literature. Projects in figure drawing, charcoal and chalk, watercolor painting, and model making are intended to stretch the student's research ability, artistic imagination, critical-analysis, and presentation skills. The class is designed for all students interested in the visual and the performing arts and serves as an introduction to set, costume, and light design. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Acting I: Beginning Acting
Rigorous physical and psychophysical exercises attempt to break through the cultural and psychological barriers that inhibit an open responsiveness to impulses, to the environment, and to others. Attempt is made to free personal response within improvised scenes and, eventually, within the narrative structure of a naturalistic scene. Attention is given to various theories of acting technique. Students are expected to audition for departmental shows. (First- and second-year students only) 3 hrs. lect./individual labs

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Voices from the Postcolonial World
In this course we will study seminal 20th century plays from countries that do not belong to the so-called “dominant west.” While our primary focus will be close analysis of dramatic texts, we will occasionally read other kinds of writing (critical work, historical essays, primary documents) with a view to gaining insight into the historical and cultural context underlying each work. Our ultimate goal is to understand the plays as three-dimensional artistic interventions into the fabric of diverse societies. The reading list will include playwrights such as Aimé Césiare, Athol Fugard, Griselda Gambaro, David Henry Hwang, William Shakespeare and Derek Walcott. All readings in English. 3 hrs. lect. (Dramatic Literature)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LIT

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Course Description

Scenic Design I: Beginning
Exploration and development of basic set design skills for theatre and dance. Class projects will introduce the student to sketching, sculpting, script analysis, and presentation skills. The design projects will challenge the student's imagination and creativity through historical and current theatrical literature, the study of artistic movements in theatre, concept development, and research. In addition, students will work on productions in order to understand better how theory relates to practice. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Lighting Design I: Beginning
This course examines historical and present lighting theories, theatrical artistic movements, and theatrical literature, leading to the planning and conceptual development of the lighting plot. Class projects will also introduce the student to sketching, painting, sculpture, script analysis, and presentation skills. In addition, students will work on productions in order to understand better how theory relates to practice. 25 hours of production lab work will be assigned in class/3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

In preparing a fully produced theatrical production for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

History of Western Dress: 1300-Present
This course will address the changing ways in which societies have clothed the human body since the phenomenon of fashion in Western dress began during the late Middle Ages. Slides, readings, and video clips will be used to examine the ways in which evolving styles of dress reflect the social and political values of a society. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Spring Production Studio: Design
In preparing two fully produced theatrical productions for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of theatrical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, painting, constructing, and running and striking of shows. More advanced students may speak to the professors about taking on special projects, but those with little or no experience backstage are very much encouraged to participate. 8 hrs. lab

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Contemporary African-American Playwrights
In this course we will explore how influential contemporary African American dramatists bring to the American stage different aspects of the black experience. From William Branch’s A Medal For Willie (1951) to Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit ’67 (2013), readings will provide students the opportunity to investigate how plays are interpreted by actors and directors, and wrestle with topics such as voting rights, cultural appropriation, housing discrimination, gender inequality, and equal access to education. Beyond dramatic texts and critical readings, students will hear some of the playwrights (via video conferencing) offer their views on topics and issues we will discuss in class. (Dramatic Literature) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, CMP, LIT

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Course Description

Acting II: Voice for the Actor
Using the Linklater technique for the voice, students will study the physiological foundations of voice and alignment. By means of interrelated physical and vocal exercises, students will discover ways of changing patterns that restrict a full range of physical and vocal expressiveness. Students will study and present passages from Shakespeare to explore ways in which their new physical and vocal skills may be used to express a greater range of intellectual and emotional understanding. (THEA 0102 and ARDV 0116; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Costume Design I: Beginning
In this introductory course we will explore the art and practice of costume design for theatre. Special emphasis will be placed on communicating ideas through the visual language. Students will develop their thinking through script analysis, creative impulse, concept development, historical research, figure drawing, fabrication, and presentation. Though we will explore the specific medium of clothing, students learn concepts that are applicable to fields beyond theatrical design by developing visual sensibility and conceiving ideas through three-dimensional space. No prior drawing experience is assumed or expected. 4 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Contemporary Women Playwrights
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect. (Dramatic Literature)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

ART, LIT

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Course Description

Theatre History
Using the dramatic text as the primary focus, this course will chart the progression of theatre from its ritualistic origins to the advent of modern drama. This survey will include an overview of theatrical architecture, the evolution of design and acting styles, and the introduction of the director. Since theatre does not exist in a void, a consideration of the social, cultural, political, and scientific milieu of each era studied will be included in the course. 2 1/2 hrs. lect./discussion & 1 screening per week

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CMP, EUR, HIS

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Course Description

Fall Production Studio: Acting
The cast works as part of a company interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held the previous term. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Directing I: Beginning
As a group, students will analyze one or two plays to discover the process involved in preparing a script for production. Attention will be given to production and design concepts, textual values, auditions, rehearsals, and the structuring of a performance in time and space. Students will also cast and direct one or more scenes to be worked on and performed in class. The practical work is combined with written analysis. (Approval required; ARDV 0116, THEA 0102) 4 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

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Course Description

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CW

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Course Description

Spring Production Studio: Acting
The cast works as part of a company, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held during the term prior to the performance. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Contemporary Latinx Playwrights
In this course we will investigate Chicana/o/x and Latina/o/x artistic activism since the 1960s in the works of playwrights such as Luis Valdez, Josefina Baéz, John Leguizamo, and Guadalís Del Carmen. In alternating in-person and online meetings, we will engage with scripts as diverse in aesthetic approach as they are in societal concerns (including misrepresentation, unfair labor practices, gender roles, immigration, and colorism). Conversations with guest artists will enhance readings about historical events that inspired theatrical challenges to the status quo. Creative responses to the materials will strengthen critical interpretive skills including production dramaturgy, performance, and design. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, LIT

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Course Description

Lighting Design II: Advanced
This upper-level course is designed for the very serious student interested in light design. The course offers hands-on experience in the studio lab, studying the relationship of the conceptualization and the organization of a light design for the 3-D stage and dance environment. (THEA 0113 and by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

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Course Description

Page to Stage: Theatre for a Turbulent World
What gives theatre its perennial power? Can a classic play speak to our dire concerns in 2020? Is a contemporary play a more effective vehicle for our cry for justice? In this introductory course we will investigate eight plays, classic and contemporary, exploring how theatre-makers take the ideas and themes of a play into consideration as they move into the practical realm of production. Readings include Sophocles’ Antigone, Suzan-Lori Parks’ /Topdog/Underdog, David Henry Hwang’s Yellowface, and Jen Silverman’s The Moors. Students will engage in creative problem-solving through different lenses via weekly labs in scenery, props, costumes, hair, makeup, stage management, sound, lighting, projections, and acting. This course will be co-taught by theatre faculty and staff, and it fulfills the crew requirement for Theatre majors.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

ART, LIT

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Course Description

The Plays of Station Eleven
This course will provide a study of theatrical literature through an interrogation of the specific ways live performance and the human body inform meaning in text-based theatre. We will begin with a reading of the novel Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, the plot of which centers around a traveling troupe of actors performing plays after a plague. After studying the novel and subsequent television series, we will begin a deep reading of the plays depicted within the story, including Shakespeare’s King Lear and Hamlet. Following these tragedies, we will read modern plays that explore different forms, themes, styles, and methods of theatre-making, again led by the evocations of post-pandemic performance. Contemporary plays will include Jonathan Payne’s The Revolving Cycles Truly and Steadily Roll’d, Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Liz Duffy Adams’ Dog Act, Anne Washburn’s Mr. Burns, a Post-Electric Play, Caridad Svich’s Twelve Ophelias, and Sarah Ruhl’s Passion Play.

Terms Taught

Spring 2023

Requirements

LIT

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Course Description

Theatre and Social Change
In this course we will explore ways in which theatre engages perceptions, behaviors, and social conditions in audiences and practitioners. While historically controversial, the practice of art as an agent of change is increasingly important, ignited by the work of Augusto Boal. We will also explore works presented in a 'conventional' theatrical setting, drama therapy, and creative role-playing in institutional settings (prisons, schools, mental health facilities). Community-based work will focus on issues facing a specific community and the voices of that group. We will read theory and history, engage issues, and build work. No previous theatre experience is required. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1334) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

ART, CMP, SOC

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Course Description

Contemporary American Playwrights
In this course we will explore through discussion and in-class dramatic presentations the plays of a selection of contemporary American writers since 1974. Students will give one oral presentation and submit a concluding essay. Authors read will include Sam Shepard, August Wilson, John Patrick Shanley, Marsha Norman, Tracey Letts, Miguel Pinero, and Ntozake Shange. (Formerly THEA/AMLT 0216) 3 hrs. lect. (Dramatic Literature)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, NOR

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Course Description

Directing and Creating: Textual Work and Devised Work
In recent years the disciplines of directing ‘text-based’ theatre and of creating (or devising) a theatre piece without an initial reliance on a text have built shared approaches to material. Devised work may be composed through vocal or physical improvisation, created through interviews, or collaged from various sources, a text may emerge during the process. Text-based theatre is more traditional in its impetus, but the process of fleshing out a text can be very similar to creating without a text. In this course we will approach both forms of theatre, creating and directing pieces in many forms, and viewing works. Readings include The Viewpoints Book, The Active Text, and The Frantic Assembly Book of Devising Theatre. The course is suggested for actors and designers as well as directors and may be used to fulfill a requirement for senior work in directing or devising. This course is not open to students who have taken THEA 0237 or THEA 0324. (THEA 0102 or THEA 0214 or THEA 0218) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Out on Stage: US Gay and Lesbian Drama
In this course we will study US American gay and lesbian plays from the 1930s through the present day. Our journey will illuminate key moments in the history of homosexuality in the United States: from the dramatization of closetedness and “the love that dares not speak its name” to the Gay Liberation Movement, the AIDS epidemic, and, lastly, the emergence of queer and transgender identities. Students will learn how to analyze the dramatic text as pre-text to a fully embodied event in front of an audience. To that end, in addition to approaching the plays through the lens of theatre praxis, we will watch recorded performances and cinematic adaptations. Secondary readings and research will illuminate the ways in which the works respond to specific historical contexts. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, NOR

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Course Description

Contemporary Native American Playwrights
In this course we will study plays and productions by contemporary Native American, First Nations, and Canadian Métis playwrights such as Mary Katherine Nagle, Larissa Fasthorse, Drew Hayden Taylor, and Monique Mojica. We will engage with scripts that reflect Indigenous resistance to settler colonialism, challenge harmful stereotypes, reclaim cultures, traditions, and languages, and celebrate survivance. Conversations with guest artists will enhance readings of critical theory and history that situate theatre as a tool for healing, transformation, sovereignty, and the future of Indigeneity. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, NOR

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Course Description

African American Drama
In this course we will respectfully investigate African American performance and theatre history since the late 19th century by exploring works of playwrights such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Amira Baraka, Adrienne Kennedy, August Wilson, and Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins. We will also engage with theoretical essays by Alain Locke, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Patricia Hill Collins and more, that illuminate how, despite centuries of lethal stereotyping, the stage has been and continues to be a forum for self-representation, unification, resistance, and liberation. Guest artists will provide firsthand accounts in conversation with the students. Dramaturgical and critical responses to the materials will strengthen production interpretation and design skills.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT

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Course Description

Acting III: Scene and Monologue Study
Designed primarily for majors who have had experience on stage or have otherwise demonstrated a serious interest in performance. The skills introduced in Acting I and Acting II are given intensive application to different kinds of dramatic texts, primarily realistic in nature. Attention will be given to expanding the performer's range of emotional and intellectual expressiveness. (Approval required) 4 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2022

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Course Description

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA/CRWR 0218 or FMMC/CRWR 0218; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART, CW

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Course Description

Directing II: Advanced
This is a course for the upper level theatre student with previous experience in directing. Students will be exposed to various contemporary performance modes and styles and will devote half the semester to the exploration, rehearsal and performance of a substantive text. Attention will be given to the director/designer collaboration, working with actors, and the pragmatic aspects of mounting a production. This course is required for students hoping to propose independent work in directing, but is open to any student with the appropriate prerequisites. (Approval required; THEA 0214, additional directing experience or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

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Course Description

Costume Design II: Advanced
In this course we will continue exploration of costume design and figure illustration. Design projects will focus on the further development of students' graphic and conceptual abilities. A range of work will be encountered, including modern dress, period realism, and fantasy. (THEA 0205 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Acting and Directing for the Camera
In this advanced workshop we will focus on the relationship between actors and directors in the context of live action media production (film, television, advertising, web series). Students will gain practical knowledge of actor-director engagement and insight into both facets of this process. Students will also analyze produced screenplays, practice actor-director communication, and direct and perform for the camera. All students will take turns fulfilling the roles of director and performer, culminating in recording and editing workshopped scenes. (FMMC 0105 or THEA 0102)

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Acting IV: Styles of Acting
The course will expose students to the rigorous physical, vocal, mental, and emotional demands of "non-naturalistic" acting, beginning with the Greeks, continuing through Shakespeare, Restoration, the eighteenth century, and ending with contemporary absurdist playwrights. Emphasis is first upon an intellectual understanding of the texts, then upon their fullest physical, vocal, and emotional expression. The course is designed for students who have had some prior stage experience. (ARDV 0116, THEA 0102 and an additional performance course) 4 hrs. lect./1hr. screen.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Twentieth/Twenty-first Century Performance Aesthetics
This course is an intensive exploration of the evolution of the theory and practice of theatrical experimentation in the 20th and 21st centuries. The Modernist movement irrevocably altered the artist’s relationship to the social, and political order. The ramifications of this change will be addressed throughout the course, with particular emphasis on Brecht, Artaud, and Grotowski. Students will write papers and give presentations on the work of such contemporary artists as Peter Brook, DV8, Robert Wilson, Ariane Mnouchkine, Complicite and Jerzy Grotowski. (Approval required; ARDV 0116 and THEA 0208) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART

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Course Description

Intermediate Independent Project
In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors in design may propose a THEA 0500 Intermediate Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Intermediate Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Senior Independent Project
Senior work is required. In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors may propose a THEA 0700 Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Winter 2019, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Winter 2021, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Senior Work: Joint Majors in Theatre and English & American Literatures
Approval required.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

Site-Specific Theatre Performance
In this course we will explore methods of creating site-specific theatre performances then work to collaboratively create a performance using these methods. Drawing on the global profile of major practitioners in the field, we will analyze international and US-based productions of note and study key principles of place and space. This class will form an ensemble of site-specific theatre-makers, working together democratically to create several performance pieces in and around campus. Through in-class exercises and readings, we will generate material for a final site-specific performance to be performed publicly.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020

Requirements

ART, WTR

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Course Description

The Art of the Argument: Making Your Case With Persuasive Performance
In this course we will practice the fundamentals of delivering arguments to a judge or jury.  Against the backdrop of the Supreme Court’s seminal decision in Cohen v. California, students will learn about the First Amendment and freedom of speech, and will present a persuasive legal argument that may require them to advocate in favor of a position with which they disagree.  Students will explore how to respond to unpopular ideas and viewpoints by relying on persuasive argument techniques.  One week of this course will be co-taught by a visiting professor with a background and formal training in theater, during which time students will learn the physical and vocal techniques used by actors and the process by which they learn to persuade an audience.  At the same time, students will learn the rhetorical strategies used by courtroom lawyers, with a focus on rational argument and discourse.  Through body language and vocal coaching, role-reversal, and performance exercises, students will learn to persuade holistically with logic, empathy, passion, and purpose.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2023

Requirements

ART, WTR

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Course Description

Introduction to Digital Media
In this course students will develop an understanding of how projections can be integrated into the theatrical space. This course is an exploration into projection design and digital media production. We’ll examine the art, tools and craft of projection design as it relates to live performance. Current practices, equipment, programming, mapping, and masking will all be covered.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

ART, WTR

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Course Description

Discovering the Clown
In this physical theatre course students will discover the joy of being on stage and screen, develop a personal relationship with the comic world, and find pleasure in a direct engagement with an audience. The study of theatrical clown helps connect students to the spontaneous, vulnerable, and generous impulses of their work. Through games, improvisation, individual and group exercises, personal writing, performance assignments, and readings we will create a supportive ensemble to encourage each student to succeed in their unique way. This is a screen-on-move-around-get-loud kind of class. Failure is encouraged. It's funny. And not funny. But that’s funny, too. (formerly INTD 1219)

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

ART, WTR

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Course Description

In this hands-on course, students will work on one costume project from concept to execution. Before the start of term, inspiration images and sketches detailing proposed project are expected so that sewing patterns can be provided. The design should be for the whole body and can be anything from formalwear to historical reproduction; casual, sports, and daywear excluded. Skills covered: pattern alteration, couture construction and finishing, working with difficult materials, and fitting techniques. Intermediate to advanced sewing skills, i.e. basic hand and machine sewing, work with sewing patterns (commercial or your own), and have constructed several garments.

Terms Taught

Winter 2023

Requirements

WTR

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Course Description

Introduction to Corsetry
In this course students will build one basic corset. A corset is a good gateway sewing project because it utilizes relatively simple sewing skills to achieve an end product with “wow” effect. Skills covered: commercial paper pattern use and alteration, basic sewing, setting grommets, and fitting. A history of the corset is included. Because we are remote, beginning machine sewing experience is required. Also, must have access to sewing machine, iron, and ironing board plus basic sewing tools. Each student will be required to purchase materials totaling approximately $90.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

ART, WTR

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Course Description

Stage to Screen: African American Plays
In Stage to Screen, we will explore how stage plays by African-American playwrights are transformed into films. Playwriting and screenwriting are closely related forms of dramatic writing; students will read 8 plays and examine the differences between each play and its film adaptation. Since this course deals with the black experience, students will investigate the socio-historical and political contexts of the play to see how the intersection of race, class, gender, culture, and politics play a role in the artistic product. Students will evaluate whether each playwright’s vision is reaffirmed, enhanced, or challenged in the transformation of play to film.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

AMR, ART, NOR, WTR

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Course Description

Mexican Revolution/Revelation
Using theatrical workshop techniques, students in this interdisciplinary will explore the socio-political-economic history, literature, music, dance, graphic art and architecture that reflect the period of time commonly known as the Mexican revolution. The course will consist of both academic research as well as dramatic and musical performance. The work will center around adapting scenes for the theater from Mariano Azuela’s novel of the revolution Los de Abajo. Students will study, contextualize and incorporate various elements of Mexican folk music into these scenes. The course will culminate in a dramatic presentation of the work.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, LIT, NOR, WTR

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Course Description

Speaking from the Stage: Hearing from Contemporary Playwrights
In this course we will explore, through reading, films, and personal performance, a selection of plays (scripted, verbatim, devised) from a range of women and women-identifying writers for the theatre. The focus of the work is both an examination in form and content of the works’ diversity, and an accompanying analysis of any thematic and formal similarities. Course reading highlights texts of the plays accompanied by historical/theoretical readings. Students will produce two brief pieces of written work, one creative and one comparative.
Playwrights will include Adrienne Kennedy, Betty Shamieh, Caridad Svich, Aleshea Harris, Naomi Wallace, Martyna Majok, Jazzmun Nichcala Crayton, Lauren Yee, and Dipika Guha.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

ART, LIT, WTR

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