Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Media, Sports, & Identity
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

See the U.S.A.: The History of Tourism in American Culture
In this course, we will explore the history and evolution of American tourism, beginning in the 1820s, when middle-class tourists first journeyed up the Hudson River valley, and ending with our contemporary and continuing obsession with iconic destinations such as Graceland, Gettysburg, and the Grand Canyon. We will explore how the growth of national transportation systems, the development of advertising, and the rise of a middle class with money and time to spend on leisure shaped the evolution of tourism. Along the way, we will study various types of tourism (such as historical, cultural, ethnic, eco-, and 'disaster' tourism) and look at the creative processes by which places are transformed into 'destinations'. Our texts will come from visual art, travel literature, material culture, and film and television. We will consider their cultural meaning and reflect on our own motivations and responses as tourists, and by so doing contemplate why tourism was-and still is-such an important part of American life. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2021

Requirements

AMR, CW, HIS, NOR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Constructing Memory: American Monuments and Memorials
“Democracy has no monuments,” John Quincy Adams once famously argued. “It strikes no medals; it bears the head of no man upon its coin; its very essence is iconoclastic.” Yet nearly 250 years after America’s founding, monuments and memorials surround us. In this course we will explore the memorializing impulse; the complexity and depth of emotion evoked by memorial acts; and the oftentimes heated controversies about modes, placement, and subject of representation. We will consider how and why America chooses to memorialize certain people and events, and what is gained—and sometimes erased—in the process. By choosing among a broad range of traditional and non-traditional modes of representation, we will consider how public memorials both reflect and shape Americans’ shared cultural values. The course will include site visits to local monuments and projects in which we propose designs or redesigns of memorials for a 21st century audience.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called native peoples hunting? How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression? In this course we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, and the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose work engages ecological issues. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1447) (formerly AMST 0214) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Asian American Food Studies
In this course we will discuss how food shapes a sense of belonging and identity in Asian America. Going beyond how Asian American cultures are consumed through food items and restaurants, we will focus on how Asian Americans have defined themselves through food. Required readings will engage questions about the production, circulation, and consumption of food. We will critically engage the genres of memoir, recipe books, fiction, historical accounts, cultural criticism, and food criticism as we write pieces in each of these styles. There will also be a limited amount of cooking involved in the course. (Approval only)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2020, Winter 2023

Requirements

AMR, CW, NOR, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Sorcery in Mesoamerica
Sorcery was fundamental to religious life in ancient Mesoamerica. Though removed from one another in time and space, the different cultures and civilizations of this region practiced magic and witchcraft. Civilizations like the Aztecs (1300-1521 CE), the Classic Maya (250-850 CE) and the Olmecs (1200-400 BCE) flourished in different environments, spoke unrelated languages, and worshipped separate gods; however, they were all fascinated by the occult. This course compares their magical traditions from a variety of viewpoints, including analytical, anthropological, and historical perspectives. It also considers the impact of European witchcraft on Mesoamerica, from the Colonial Period to the present.3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, NOR, PHL, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Collaborative Film-making
This course offers students an opportunity to collaboratively make videos with a group of young women workers in Bangalore, India who were the first in their families to get professional jobs and join the city’s growing startup economy. However, with job cuts, many workers lost their jobs. Others stayed on, knowing their jobs were precarious. How do the workers make meaningful lives amidst this uncertainty? Through a transnational and collaborative project, Middlebury students will connect with workers, read about the ethics and challenges of collaborative research and develop 5-minute films of their lives through videos, photographs, and audio files shared online. No prior experience with filmmaking is required.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) (GloDeFem)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, MDE, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Receptor Biology
In this course we will focus on the wide range of membrane receptors and channels that are critical for cellular communication, neuronal connectivity, and sensory transduction. These complex proteins represent major targets in the pharmaceutical industry, and their study incorporates interdisciplinary techniques in structural biology, electrophysiology, synthetic chemistry, and pharmacology. After thoroughly engaging in the primary literature, we will emphasize discipline-specific writing and learn to summarize and communicate new findings to a wide range of expert and non-expert audiences. (BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SCI

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Conservation Biology
A conservation biologist is a problem-solver who applies tools from disparate fields – e.g., evolutionary biology, genetics, ecology, paleontology, anthropology, and population biology – to address complex real-world dilemmas of relevance to human, wildlife, and ecosystem health. To effectively leverage their data, conservation biologists must also recognize and navigate government regulations, diverse cultural practices, and stakeholder perceptions. This course is international in scope. Emphasis will be placed on current issues such as species reintroduction, detecting extinction, rewilding, novel ecosystems, protected area design, shifting baselines, human-wildlife conflict, and climate change. This course will require engagement with community partners in independent research. (BIOL 140 required; recommended ENVS 112, BIOL 145)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SCI

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Histories of Struggle: Middlebury, Town and Gown
In this upper-level seminar, students will examine the historical experiences of Black, PoC, female, LBGTQ, gender non-conforming, and “othered” persons at Middlebury College and in the town, circa 1800-2020. Students will access digital sources housed at Special Collections (Davis Library) and at the Stewart-Swift Research Center (Henry Sheldon Museum) on a range of topics, including race, gender, and sexuality in the contexts of anti-slavery, colonization, eugenics, temperance, women’s rights, and entertainment. Students will receive either BLST or HIST CW credit, for which they will produce 25-page essays. The essays will be archived in Special Collections for use by future researchers. At the conclusion of the course, students will be invited to translate their essays into publicly exhibited Twilight Projects, for which they will receive a small stipend.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

CW, HIS, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Instrumental Analysis
In this course we will learn fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., UV/Vis spectrophotometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Biochemistry Laboratory
Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Women in Chinese American Diaspora Literature, 1950s-1990s
In this course we explore literary works written about Chinese American women by Chinese American women in the second half of the twentieth century. A comparison of commercially successful English-language works, such as Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club, and works originally written in Chinese for an overseas audience in Asia, such as Nieh Hualing’s Mulberry and Peach, will be the starting point for investigating questions about who these narratives are for, how they shape the Chinese American identity, and how they reflect the intersections of gender, race, and language.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, LIT, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Literature of the Roman Empire
In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, EUR, HIS, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Introduction to World Literature
This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Philosophy & Literature
In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, EUR, LIT, PHL

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA/CRWR 0218 or FMMC/CRWR 0218; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Science Writing for the Public
This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers and for online publication. Students will publish in our online magazine (constructed Spring 2017). In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. Students will also learn to manipulate images and how to use digital storytelling. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert; we will also read from The Best Science and Nature Writing (Amy Stewart, ed, 2016). 3 hrs. Sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AMR, CW, LIT, NOR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing the Environment in the Digital Age
In this course we will explore the environmental narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio and video recorders–the tools of today’s investigative journalists–students will undertake their own environmental investigation in the Middlebury area (anything from wind energy to bat disappearance to land-use along rivers), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history and narrative thread. Students will read from a wide selection of environmental authors including Andy Revkin, Elizabeth Kolbert, Tim Robinson, Michael Pollan, Gretel Ehrlich, Rick Bass, Bill McKibben, Annie Dillard, Carl Safina, and Barry Lopez, and write in the environmental genre, incorporating interviews, photos, and audio and video files in the final writing projects. (ENVS 215 and CRWR 170 or CRWR 173) Approval required. (Video and audio equipment supplied by the college) Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing the Self
Memoir, reportage, criticism, essays: creative nonfiction holds it all. In this course we will read a range of nonfiction, from in-depth journalism to personal essays and memoir excerpts. We will use our own experiences to write in class and out, and we will share our work together. We’ll ask of our readings and ourselves, how does the “I” work? We’ll read diverse experiences and perspectives to ask how personal experience can enlighten – or detract from – larger themes or issues. Readings include nonfiction by Alexander Chee, Hilton Als, Kiese Laymon, Durga Chew-Bose, Leslie Jamison, Esme Weijung Wang, James Baldwin, and more.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Computational Complexity
We will investigate the computational power of various resources. Examples include determining whether a computer with limited time or limited space can solve more difficult problems, attempting to characterize creativity as a resource, and comparing probabilistic and quantum computation. We will learn why we do not yet have answers to many of the most fundamental questions in computational complexity (like whether P=NP), and we will think critically about the value of studying these topics. Students enrolled in the College Writing (CW) section of the course will explore these ideas through writing, in particular, in three contexts that are critical for theoretical computer science: the proof (expert audience), the review paper (non-expert computer science audience), and the popular science article (educated public audience). (CSCI 0301).3 hrs. sem./1 hr. disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Health Economics and Policy
In this course we will focus on the health care system of the United States. We will apply standard microeconomic tools to the problems of health and health care markets. The course provides the fundamental tools with which to understand how the health care market is different from the markets for other goods. For example, students will learn about the dominant presence of uncertainty at all levels of health care, the government's unusually large presence in the market, the pronounced difference in knowledge between doctors and patients, and the prevalence of situations where the actions of some impose costs or benefits on others (e.g., vaccinations, drug research). (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

AMR, CW, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Economics and Gender
Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Theories of Economic Development in Latin America
This course is designed to provide a survey of the most important issues facing Latin American policymakers today. The course will place contemporary problems in their historical perspective and will use applied economic analysis to examine the opportunities and constraints facing the economies of Latin America. (ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Economic Journalism*
Drawing on core courses in the major, students will strengthen their understanding of economic analysis and develop their writing skills by addressing contemporary economic issues in a journalistic format. In a series of weekly assignments, including book reviews, op-eds, and coverage of recent research articles, students will translate the language of formal economics into pieces that are both interesting and accessible to educated non-economists. Most class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic and expository content of student work. (ECON 211 and ECON 250 and ECON 255) 3 hr. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Theory and Measurement in Economic History
Economic historians study past events, employing diverse methodologies to understand technology adoption, market integration, and the effect of institutions on performance. In this course we will focus on strategies economists use to learn about the past itself and to use past events to understand how all economies function. We will ponder especially conflicts and complementarities between theoretical and empirical reasoning. Each student will complete a research proposal that justifies applying a set of tools to address an economic history question. (ECON 0111 [formerly ECON 0210] and ECON 0255 or IPEC 0240 [formerly ECON 0240]) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, CW, HIS, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policies for Developing Countries
In this course we will examine key macroeconomics challenges faced by developing countries . In contrast to the senior seminar in Macroeconomics of Development, which focuses on long-run growth, this course focuses on short-run and medium-run macroeconomic issues; as such, it builds more closely on the Macroeconomic Theory core course. The topics covered include structural constraints on aggregate demand, fiscal and monetary policies, distributive conflict, and debt. We will examine these topics through a combination of formal theoretical models and real-world applications. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, CW, SAF

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Student Teaching Seminar
Concurrent with student teaching, this course is designed to provide guidance in curriculum development and its implementation in the classroom, and to explore issues related to the teaching process and the profession. Students will construct a Teaching Licensure Portfolio as well as exchange ideas about their student teaching experiences. Topics including technology, classroom management, special education, and assessment will be featured. The Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, the five Standards for Vermont Educators, the Principles for Vermont Educators, and ROPA-R will guide the development of the Teacher Licensure Portfolio. (Corequisite: EDST 0405, EDST 0406, EDST 0407 or EDST 0415, EDST 0416 EDST 0417) (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Social Justice and Evolutionary Spirituality
In this “course” we will explore whether we can create intellectually dynamic spaces of regeneration and renewal while enrolled at an historically White supremacist institution. There are two central texts for our inquiry: (1) Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love and Liberation (2016), by The Reverend Angel Kyodo Williams, Lama Rod Owens and Jasmine Syedullah, Ph.D.; and (2) American Awakening: Evolutionary Spirituality, Non-Duality & Free Thinking in the Tradition of American Philosophy (2020) by the spiritual philosopher, Jeff Carreira. Class meetings will involve contemplative practices, writing workshops and students will share in the leading of our seminar-based discussions.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021, Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, PHL, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Reading Literature
Please refer to each section for specific course descriptions.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Winter 2020, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Documentary Poetics
In this course we will examine how poetry intervenes in the world. What kinds of history can poetry document, capture, or reflect? What can we learn from poetic documentation that we might not otherwise? We will read texts that incorporate archival materials and ephemera as well as works tracing limitations of the archive. Readings will include Charles Reznikoff, Dionne Brand, Muriel Rukeyser, Langston Hughes, Layli Long Soldier, Theresa Ha Kyung Cha, Caroline Bergvall, and M. Nourbese Philip, among others. Students will create their own poetic work throughout this class. Their fina

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Advanced Expository Writing
In this course students will have the opportunity to work intensively to improve the style and impact of their expository (non-fiction) writing. Students will write short daily essays on assigned prompts, culminating in a longer essay on a topic of their choosing. This course is meant for ambitious writers who are confident in their basic composition skills. The course will be conducted asynchronously on Canvas, and students will read a selection of exemplary essays as well as work by their fellow students for inspiration. Each student will meet via Zoom with the professor at least twice per week to discuss their progress.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

ART, CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Science Fiction
Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Formerly ENAM 0253)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Transnational Feminist Conservation
In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, SAF, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Documentary Rhetorics
In this course students will explore the rhetorical performances of documentary film—in terms of production, ethics, and editing—and how documentaries are used for different means: investigation, activism, and even propaganda. After watching contemporary documentaries and reading reviews, interviews, analyses, and theories of filmmaking, students will analyze specific films (with cultural rhetorics and social consciousness lenses), conduct and transcribe interviews, and write a code of ethics for documentary filmmakers. The final project has students either produce or storyboard their own short documentaries.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Film Theory
This course surveys the issues that have sparked the greatest curiosity among film scholars throughout cinema's first century, such as: What is the specificity of the film image? What constitutes cinema as an art? How is authorship in the cinema to be accounted for? Is the cinema a language, or does it depart significantly from linguistic coordinates? How does one begin to construct a history of the cinema? What constitutes valid or useful film research? Readings will include Epstein, Eisenstein, Bazin, Truffaut, Wollen, Mulvey, Benjamin, Kracauer, and others. (Formerly FMMC 0344) (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2022

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Theories of Popular Culture
This writing-intensive course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study American popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and identity and social power. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, films to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0101 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we explore the transcultural dynamics of spectatorship, audience engagement, and fan communities, from Hitchcock to anime, from The Beatles to BLACKPINK, from Star Trek to The Untamed. How do we engage with media texts in local and global contexts? Is our experience of media today radically different from the early years of cinema? What does it mean to be a fan? Have our notions of fandom changed over time? How do race, gender, class, national, and cultural context inform media engagement? We will consider key theoretical approaches and interrogate our own position as spectators, consumers, and fans in media culture. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0223 or FMMC 0276) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Key Concepts in Film & Media Criticism
This writing-intensive seminar takes a close look at four key theoretical concepts for film & media criticism: textuality, authorship, genre, and narrative. How do we understand the boundaries between any film “text” and its broader intertextual contexts? How does authorship frame our understanding of the style and ethics of any given film? How do genre categories help us make sense of films and media, as well as their cultural contexts? How do films and media tell stories in distinctive and innovative ways? Through theoretical readings and exemplary screenings, we will learn to become sharper critics of films and media. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Self and Society: Effective Writing in French
In this course, students will deepen their knowledge of the French language and French-speaking cultures while developing their reading and writing skills through examination of a variety of texts and media. This course facilitates the transition from language-oriented courses (FREN 0205) to content-oriented courses (such as FREN 0220 and FREN 0230) by introducing students to strategies for interpretation and discussion, with a focus on effective writing. Course materials may include essays/articles, theater, fiction, poetry, videos, and films. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, EUR, LNG

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Research Craft in Human Geography
Whether you are planning to do your own research or want to be a more savvy consumer of research produced by others, it is useful to develop an understanding of the process of creating, discovering, and interpreting information about the world. In this course, students will explore quantitative and qualitative methodologies and the ways they can be used in human geography research. Through examples, exercises, and readings, students will learn the types of questions different techniques are designed to answer, how they work, and how to interpret the results. Students will gain hands on experience conducting surveys, generating and interpreting qualitative data, selecting and implementing statistical analyses, and writing research reports, to build competence and critical awareness in the practice and communication of research. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab (formerly GEOG 0339)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Conservation Planning
Conservation planners try to identify and protect places with natural and cultural values. In this course we will investigate geographical concepts and methods for interpreting landscape change, inventorying natural resources, and evaluating conservation plans. We will examine the contributions and limitations of maps and geographic information systems in conservation planning through a combination of computer-based analyses, field investigations, readings, writing workshops, and discussions. The Town of Middlebury will provide a case study and students will develop independent projects that compare Middlebury to other towns in Vermont. (GEOG 0150). 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Practicing Human Geography
Whether you are planning to do your own research or want to be a more savvy consumer of research produced by others, it is useful to develop an understanding of the process of creating, discovering, and interpreting information about the world. In this course, students will explore quantitative and qualitative methodologies and the ways they can be used in human geography research. Through examples, exercises, and readings, students will learn the types of questions different techniques are designed to answer, how they work, and how to interpret the results. Students will gain hands on experience conducting surveys, generating and interpreting qualitative data, selecting and implementing statistical analyses, and writing research reports, to build competence and critical awareness in the practice and communication of research. (At least one course in geography, AP human geography credit, or instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Geologic Evolution of Vermont
This course explores the fascinating geology of Vermont. Students learn the geology through six field problems, involving extended trips around western Vermont. Lectures on the meaning of rocks support the fieldwork. The last few indoor labs are devoted to understanding the geologic map of Vermont. Emphasis is on descriptive writing and on use of data to interpret origin of rocks. Culminates in a written report on the geologic and plate tectonic evolution of Vermont. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

CW, SCI

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Structural Geology
Plate tectonics and mountain building processes result in deformation of the Earth's crust. Structural geology is the study of this deformation, and this course will examine the many types of structures found in crustal rocks (folds, faults, etc.) and explore the forces responsible for their formation. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the hands-on description and analysis of structures in the field, as well as the practical aspects of map interpretation and computer analysis of structural data. (GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020

Requirements

CW, SCI

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Active Tectonics and Earthquake Hazards
In this class we will explore what drives Earth’s system of tectonic plates and why plate motion causes earthquakes. We will learn about modern techniques used to document plate motion and predict the size, style, and timing of earthquakes. Students will also explore the numerous hazards associated with earthquakes and how the threat they pose to humans can be mitigated. Learning goals will focus on reading primary scientific literature, identifying unanswered questions, and developing ideas for original research. (One introductory course in GEOL, or instructor’s permission) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

CW, SCI

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

German in Its Cultural Contexts
The course invites students to explore social and cultural developments in Germany from 1871 to the present day from a historical perspective. We begin by examining Germany’s birth as a nation state and end by looking at recent events in today’s reunified Federal Republic. The course aims to lay the foundation for a critical understanding of German culture in its contemporary global context. Writing the biographies of fictional Germans throughout the semester, students will follow the radical changes in German society during the (long) twentieth century and gain an understanding how ‘ordinary’ people in Germany might have lived. A montage of written and visual materials will expose students to elite, mainstream, and marginal cultures alike. Taught in German. (Formerly GRMN 0310) (GRMN 0202 or placement) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, EUR, HIS, LNG

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, LIT, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2023

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, MDE, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, poems and videos by writers such as James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldúa and Kelly Tsai. Students will respond to critical and creative writing prompts, conduct fieldwork, and design two writing projects of their own. The class format will include conversations with guest writers, writing workshops, contemplative activities, and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, through a transnational lense. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2021

Requirements

CMP, CW, LIT, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. This course is part of the Public Humanities Labs Initiative administered by the Axinn Center for the Humanities. 3 hrs. lect. (Critical Race Feminisms, National/Transnational Feminisms) (FemSTHM)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom
In this course we will explore the dynamics of spectatorship, audience engagement, and fan communities, from Hitchcock to anime, from The Beatles to BLACKPINK, from Star Trek to The Untamed. How do we engage with media texts? Is our experience of media today radically different from the early years of cinema? What does it mean to be a fan? Have our notions of fandom changed over time? How do race, gender, class, and cultural context inform media engagement? We will consider key theoretical approaches and interrogate our own position as spectators, consumers, and fans in media culture. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0276) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Representing Reproduction: The Politics of Reproduction 2
In this project-based seminar on reproductive politics, students will construct materials related to an animation about abortion that is being produced in the Middlebury Animation Studio. These materials may include a podcast, website, or game. Extending the discussions we had in GSFS 329: The Politics of Reproduction, we will also view popular cultural representations that focus on reproductive issues in the United States (such as television series, films, etc) and examine broader discussions of these representations (in blogs, podcasts, etc). Doing so will allow us to produce materials that both draw from academic discussions of reproduction and push beyond the limits of these texts for addressing contemporary reproductive politics. (GSFS 0329)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019

Requirements

AMR, CW, NOR, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Men and Masculinities
In this course we will consider the creation and performance of masculinities in the American context.  We will ask how men are made and how that making relies on class, race, sexuality, and nation. We will begin with early capitalism and the birth of the ideal man as “market man.”  We will then look at how ideal masculinity depends on the creation of “degenerate” men, like the myth of the hyper-masculinized Black male “beast” and the creation of the mythic mannish lesbian.  We will then trace these late 19th century men and masculinities into our current moment of political machismo, trolling misogyny, bromance, feminist men, hipster men, dandy bois, transmen, and more.  Readings will include: Michael Kimmel, Guyland; C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges, Exploring Masculinities: Identity, Inequality, Continuity and Change; C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School; Judith Halberstam, Female Masculinity, and bell hooks, We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity.  (GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0289) 3 hrs. sem. (Critical Race Feminisms)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AMR, CW, HIS, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Feminist Engaged Research
What makes research feminist? How does one conduct feminist research? How has feminist research been useful to social movements and how have movements informed feminist research? What happens to feminist research when it moves to the public sphere? In this class students learn how to produce original feminist research—how to craft research questions, write a literature review, choose relevant methodologies, and collect and analyze qualitative data. In addition to writing a research paper, students will translate their research findings into an alternative (non-academic paper) format and for an audience beyond our classroom. (GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Transnational Feminist Conservation
In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2022

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, SAF, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Collaborative Film-making
This course offers students an opportunity to collaboratively make videos with a group of young women workers in Bangalore, India who were the first in their families to get professional jobs and join the city’s growing startup economy. However, with job cuts, many workers lost their jobs. Others stayed on, knowing their jobs were precarious. How do the workers make meaningful lives amidst this uncertainty? Through a transnational and collaborative project, Middlebury students will connect with workers, read about the ethics and challenges of collaborative research and develop 5-minute films of their lives through videos, photographs, and audio files shared online. No prior experience with filmmaking is required.

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Mastodons, Mermaids, and Dioramas: Capturing Nature in America
Why did 18th-century museums stuff and mount exotic and domestic animals? Why does the American Museum of Natural History still house dioramas of so-called native peoples hunting? How has the study and staging of nature transferred into various kinds of artistic expression? In this course we will examine the intertwining of art, science, and ecology in the United States from the 1700s to the present day. Objects of study will include museum dioramas, scientific models, artifacts and artworks collected during scientific expeditions, and the work of Walton Ford and Christy Rupp, contemporary artists whose work engages ecological issues. (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1447) (formerly AMST 0214) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Ways of Seeing
In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Rhetoric of Public Memory
This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CW, HIS, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made
In this seminar we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Some of these technologies remained localized, while others—like porcelain and silk—went on to transform world history by fueling major export markets. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as: How was Asian art made; Why was it made that way? What was its historical impact? Topics will include jade and other hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AAL, ART, CW, HIS, NOA

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

History of Pakistan
This course is a political and cultural history of Pakistan. Topics to be discussed include: the pre-independence demand for Pakistan; the partitioning of India in 1947; literary and cultural traditions; the power of the army in politics; the civil war that created Bangladesh; the wars with India; the wars in Afghanistan; the rise of Islamist parties and militant groups; the significance of the Taliban and al Qaeda; and Pakistan's relations with the US, China and India. Readings will include histories, autobiographies, novels, and newspaper and magazine accounts. Several documentary films will also be shown. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, HIS, SOA

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Histories of Struggle: Middlebury, Town and Gown
In this upper-level seminar, students will examine the historical experiences of Black, PoC, female, LBGTQ, gender non-conforming, and “othered” persons at Middlebury College and in the town, circa 1800-2020. Students will access digital sources housed at Special Collections (Davis Library) and at the Stewart-Swift Research Center (Henry Sheldon Museum) on a range of topics, including race, gender, and sexuality in the contexts of anti-slavery, colonization, eugenics, temperance, women’s rights, and entertainment. Students will receive either BLST or HIST CW credit, for which they will produce 25-page essays. The essays will be archived in Special Collections for use by future researchers. At the conclusion of the course, students will be invited to translate their essays into publicly exhibited Twilight Projects, for which they will receive a small stipend.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021

Requirements

CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Chronicling COVID-19: Capturing the Pandemic Experience in Vermont
The COVID-19 pandemic has altered our lives and challenged the way our communities and institutions operate. The availability of vaccines has made it possible to gain some perspective on COVID and its impact. In this course we will work as chroniclers and interpreters of the local community’s responses to COVID. In addition to situating COVID among other notable public health emergencies in Vermont – the 1918 pandemic, the 1927 flood, and the 2011 Irene disaster – we will explore the experiences of Addison County residents as they navigated this pandemic. In collaboration with Special Collections, we will conduct oral history interviews and gather other historical materials for this multi-staged class research project. (Counts for HSMT credit)

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, HIS, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Law, Organization, and Society
In this course students will learn about the structure and function of the U.S.’s legal institutions and reflect on their impact on individuals, commerce, and society. Inherently interdisciplinary in nature, students will read books by sociologists and journalists, examine important case law, and gain perspective about the role that the legal system plays in our society. Students will consider the law’s role as an essential social institution that shapes and is shaped by society and social actors.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Purpose, Profit, and Planet
In this course students will explore a question with deep implications for our society: do businesses have an ethical or social responsibility to move beyond the profit-maximization principle? If so, to what extent should businesses act as social institutions that shape the basic rules of society rather than simply reacting to them? By drawing on materials from social sciences, humanities, and the legal field, students will consider to what extent business should become part of the sustainable and planetary solution and what their ethical responsibility is to minimize their own harmful actions.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and opinion pieces. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline, covering the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the pros and cons of social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today. (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Oratory Lab - Speechwriting
What changes when, instead of writing to an imagined reader, we stand and speak to a live audience? Can learning to present with more clarity and conviction make us better writers? And what about coaching? Does learning to help others communicate more effectively make us more effective as well? These are among the questions we’ll explore in the O-Lab – Oratory Now’s new research and development wing. Students will progress through a series of short writing and speaking assignments designed to increase both comfort and connection to the audience. The course will culminate in a speechwriting showcase open to the public.

Terms Taught

Winter 2021, Winter 2022, Winter 2023

Requirements

CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Liberal Learning in a Time of Challenge
In this course, we will explore how an education in the liberal arts and sciences may help one face -our complicated times with added resilience, compassion and curiosity. Our guiding question: how can your education help you live fully in this moment and cultivate a life of the mind—and spirit—that helps you address the challenges in the world around us? We’ll explore this question by way of discussion, written reflection and mindfulness practices and consider texts such as: Frankl, The Search for Meaning; Coates, Between the World and Me, Mandel, Station Eleven, Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air, and Martel, The Life of Pi. (This course is not open to students who have taken INTD 0210)

Terms Taught

Winter 2022, Winter 2023

Requirements

CMP, CW, LIT, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Boccaccio’s Decameron in the Age of Coronavirus
Composed at the end of the 1348 Black Plague, the Decameron engages the social crises emerging from pandemic. Popularly considered only a collection of bawdy stories, we will challenge this popular stereotype of the work, discussing also how its storytelling emerges as a responsible act critiquing the society passing away, and proposing alternatives foundational to modern Western society regarding class, gender, and religion. We will also consider how contemporary Western essays and media (some in translation) re-engage the Decameron. Class work includes short analytical essays with rewrites, blogging, scrapbooking, and a class project rewriting the Decameron for today. This course will be conducted exclusively in English, with English language sources. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, EUR, HIS, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Italian Identities: Gender, Race, Culture
What does it mean to be "Italian"? In this course we will analyze Italian identities by reading and listening to a variety of sources and authors, and discuss the role that concepts such as gender, race, nation, culture, value/s, diversity, otherness, and intersectionality play. While learning about contemporary Italy, we will work on our linguistic, critical, and analytical skills. Special emphasis will be placed on both Academic and Public Writing, and we will rely on rewriting, editing, and peer reviewing. (ITAL0252 or by permission, taught in Italian) 3hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, EUR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Italy and Migrants
International migration is a major contemporary phenomenon for many countries, including Italy. We will read, analyze, and write effectively about migrants' stories, struggles, related issues for host countries, and how migrants' lives are portrayed in various media. The goals of this Calderwood Seminar are to learn about migration through the lenses of Italy, and to improve student writing. We will pay particular attention to writing effectively and for a general audience, through peer-writing sessions and group discussions. Class meetings are once a week, but students will be required to interact regularly outside of class, providing in-depth feedback to each other's essays. (ITAL 0252 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2020

Requirements

CW, EUR, LNG

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Math and Board Games
Have you ever spent minutes agonizing over which move to make in a board game? Out of all the possible options, how could you possibly determine which move is best? Was there even an objectively best decision? In this course, we will explore the mathematics and underlying gameplay structures of several modern board games. In addition to playing these games during class, we’ll use math and logic to assess and quantify the value of a range of possible in-game decisions. Using formal mathematical proofs, papers, and in-class discussions, we’ll analyze the fairness and equity of strategies across a wide variety of games. We’ll finish the course by designing our own board game based on what we’ve learned! (Students who have completed FYSE1216 are not eligible to enroll in MATH 0106.)

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Mathematical modeling
An introduction into the process of developing and interpreting mathematical models within the framework of numerous applications. In this course, we will utilize discrete, continuous, and probabilistic approaches to explore applications such as population dynamics, epidemiology, and neuron activity. Time permitting, we may also introduce the derivation of spatiotemporal models. MATLAB will be used to implement and analyze several of these models. (MATH 0200 and MATH 0225 or MATH 0226, or by instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Numerical Linear Algebra
Numerical linear algebra is the study of algorithms for solving problems such as finding solutions of linear systems and eigenvalues of matrices. Many real-life applications simplify to these scenarios and often involve millions of variables. We will analyze shortcomings of direct methods such as Gaussian Elimination, which theoretically produces the true solution but fails in practical applications. In contrast, iterative methods are often more practical and precise, and continually evolve with changing technology and our understanding of mathematics. Our study will include the First Order Richardson, Steepest Descent, and Conjugate Gradient algorithms for linear systems, and the power method for eigenvalue problems. (MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Music in Western Cultures
In this course we will develop skills for assessing music’s social, economic, and political importance in Western societies. Through a series of units focusing on various aspects of music (such as composition, performance, dissemination, and reception) and on various eras from ancient Greece to the present, students will engage with the principal questions and methods of historical musicology. (MUSC 0101) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CMP, CW, HIS

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Philosophy of Race
In this course we will explore different answers to philosophical questions about the nature and reality of race, the nature of racism, and social or political questions related to race or racism. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2021

Requirements

CW, PHL, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Philosophy and Literature
In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014 or FYSE 1081.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020

Requirements

CW, EUR, LIT, PHL

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Philosophy of Aristotle
In this class we will explore both the original breadth and the contemporary relevance of Aristotle's thought. We will read a diverse selection of his writings, beginning with ethical and political works, continuing to works on art and poetry, the soul, and nature, and concluding with logical and ontological works. We will ask why Aristotelian virtue ethics in particular has enjoyed a recent renaissance and generated special interest in Aristotle's ideas about the ethical role of friendship, the perceptive power of the emotions, and the different kinds of intelligence. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CW, EUR, PHL

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Liberalism and Its Critics
Liberal political thought is widely touted and accepted in Western societies. In this course, we will take a close look at what liberalism is by investigating the origins of liberalism in the writings of John Locke and John Stuart Mill and by evaluating the thought of contemporary liberal political philosophers, e.g. John Rawls and Will Kymlicka. We will also analyze the arguments of those like Michael Sandel and Yael Tamir who have criticized liberalism as misguided or incomplete. We seek to gain an understanding of the political and moral principles that give priority to liberty and related values or concepts like toleration, autonomy, and fairness. (One course in philosophy or waiver) 3hrs.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, PHL

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Experimental Techniques in Physics
This course will cover the design and execution of experiments, and the analysis and presentation of data, at an advanced level. Laboratory experiments will be chosen to illustrate the use of electronic, mechanical, and optical instruments to investigate fundamental physical phenomena, such as the properties of atoms and nuclei and the nature of radiation. Skills in computer-based data analysis and presentation will be developed and emphasized. This course satisfies the College writing requirement. (PHYS 0111 concurrent or prior; PHYS 0201 and PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/1 hr disc. (Approval required)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Local Green Politics
How do local communities manage their natural resources? How do they navigate global forces that often work against them? Through systematic comparisons of cases of successful and unsuccessful community resource management efforts, we will assess under what conditions local communities are likely to be successful environmental stewards. The course will draw on experiences from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the USA. Students will compare the cultural contexts in which resource management decisions are made. By the end of the course, students will be expected to describe and critically analyze cases of resource (mis)management. They will also learn to offer solutions to situations of resource mismanagement. 3 hrs. lect./disc./(Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AAL, CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

What Can I Say? Free Speech v. Racist Speech in the United States and Europe
In this course we will delve into the politics and law surrounding issues of racist speech in the United States and Europe. We will look at the development of speech doctrines in the post-World War Two era, drawing on well-known case studies from American constitutional history, as well as European examples such as the Danish Cartoon Controversy and Holocaust denial cases. Through comparison across time and countries, we will debate the appropriate limits on racist speech in different contexts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1510 or PSCI 1023) 3 hrs. lect./disc (Comparative Politics)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

CMP, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Political Economy of Drug Trafficking
This course examines the political economy of drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere. How have transnational drug markets evolved, and why? What effects has narco-trafficking had on the political, economic, legal, financial, and social systems of producer, consumer, and transshipment countries? What policy responses are available to combat it? How should we weigh alternative policy options? Examination of these issues centers on source countries in Latin America's Andean region, the chief transshipment country (Mexico), and the principal consumer country (the US). Attention also is devoted to the drug trade's effects on American society and criminal justice system. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2020

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Comparative Politics of Religion
This course provides students with an introduction to the study of religion in political science. The course is divided into four sections. The first section provides a theoretical background to religion and its study in political science. The second section discusses long-standing debates over the concept of ‘secularization.’ The third section examines the study of religion and democracy, with a special focus on the non-western case of India. The final section explores the effect of religion on political violence, with empirical examples from around the world. The last class explores the future of the study of religion in political science. (Comparative Politics) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Authoritarian Politics
The purpose of this course is to examine the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes. First, we will define autocracy and consider different forms of authoritarianism and how their leaders come into power. Next, we will investigate why some authoritarian regimes are able to sustain their rule while others collapse. Finally, we will explore how citizens of these regimes bolster, comply with, or revolt against their governments. Throughout the course, adopting a comparative standpoint, we will draw on various country cases. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021

Requirements

CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Politics of Virtual Realities
How has technology changed our politics? Are those changes all for the good? In this course we will explore the political, legal, and normative implications of the Internet for liberal democracy. We start with the US Constitution and explore arguments that it cannot by itself prevent the Internet from becoming a domain of manipulation rather than of freedom. How can we uphold the ideals of liberty and equality? And, since cyberspace has no country, whose laws should govern it? Cases will include President Obama's campaign and governance strategies, Google's activities abroad, cybersecurity, virtual war, and the WikiLeaks controversy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Politics of Taxes
Who gets taxed and how much they get taxed is at least as much a political decision as an economic one. Additionally, the ways governments tax their citizens (and how much they tax them) vary widely between different countries. Moreover, the purpose underlying governments’ use of taxes ranges from fighting inequality to incentivizing various behavioral changes. In this course we will examine sales taxes, wealth taxes, corporate profits, income taxes and the politics around those taxes in a variety of national contexts. (Comparative Politics). 3 hrs. sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Political Development of Western Europe
In what ways are the political systems and politics of France, Germany, Italy, and Britain similar? In what ways do they differ? How might we explain these patterns? This course attempts to answer these questions through comparative investigation of the processes and consequences of economic and political modernization in these nations from the feudal period to the 21st century. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/

Terms Taught

Spring 2022

Requirements

CMP, CW, EUR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

American Power: Soft, Hard, or Smart
Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, turmoil in the Middle East, and Russian and Chinese expansionist tendencies have raised important questions about how the United States should use power to defend its interests. In this course we will survey historical, institutional, and theoretical factors as a prelude to consideration of how the United States has used its power since WWII. Using selected case studies, we will examine pro/con arguments for different approaches to the use of power (soft, hard, smart) with class debate and discussion, as well as reviews of relevant daily news reports written and presented by class members. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Winter 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, NOR, SOC, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, DED

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Jews and Christians: Conflict and Identity
“Urging a Jew to convert to Christianity is like advising a person to move upstairs while demolishing the ground floor.” This quip by Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) epitomizes Christianity’s conflicted attitude to its Jewish origin, affirming it while rejecting it. Yet the relationship is not symmetrical, for the very reason that Judaism precedes Christianity. In this course we examine the fraught relationship between Christians and Jews from antiquity to the present. Readings include Church Fathers, rabbinic texts, polemics, theologians, as well as the Catholic declarations of Vatican II and modern interfaith dialogue. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, CW, EUR, HIS, PHL

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Death in Latin America
The refrain of colonialism in the Americas was death. In its wake, encounters with dying and the dead shaped national cultures and popular religiosities across the hemisphere. In this course we will explore the diversity of rituals, stories, and devotions surrounding death in Latin America. Through a careful reading of Eduardo Galeano’s The Open Veins of Latin America, we will critically examine the geopolitical entity of Latin America in its historical context while learning how to write powerfully about its social and economic realities. We will cover death across secular and religious formations in Mexico, Haiti, Brazil, Guatemala, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab.*This course is part of the Public Humanities Labs Initiative administered by the Axinn Center for the Humanities.*

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2021

Requirements

AAL, AMR, CMP, CW, PHL, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Gogol and Romantic Melancholy (In English)
In this course we will explore the corpus of one of the canonical figures of nineteenth-century Russian literature, Nikolai Gogol, and situate him within a broader tradition of romantic melancholy in Western, and later, Russian culture (e.g. writers such as Poe, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Dostoevsky, Platonov, filmmakers such as Tarkovsky and Zviagintsev). How does one describe a world where formerly familiar pathways to transcendence have been left in ruins by modernity? Can this loss be remedied in art, or only repeated? Twice weekly discussions of materials in English, though students are encouraged to engage with the original texts. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020

Requirements

CW, EUR, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Logic of Sociological Inquiry
In this course students will be introduced to the basic tools of sociological research including problem formulation, strategies of design and data collection, and analysis and presentation of results. This class will help students formulate a research question and develop a research strategy to best explore that question. Those strategies may include interviews, structured observation, participant observation, content analysis, and surveys. This class, strongly recommended for juniors, will culminate in the submission of a senior project proposal. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Sociology)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab (Anthropology)

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Creative Non-Fiction in Spanish
This course will introduce students to creative non-fiction in the Spanish language. We will explore the techniques and literary skills necessary for researching and writing memoirs and personal essays, and students will produce at least three polished essays. Readings will include Spanish and Latin American masters and theorists of the genre will include Borges, Cortázar, Castellanos, Larra, Hostos, Paz, and Poniatowska. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019

Requirements

AAL, AMR, ART, CW, LIT, LNG

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Playwriting I: Beginning
The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218)

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Playwriting II: Advanced
For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA/CRWR 0218 or FMMC/CRWR 0218; by approval) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

ART, CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing to Heal
This writing-intensive course examines writing as a catalyst for healing after loss or grief. In a workshop focused on student writing, we will analyze fiction, drama, poetry, and creative nonfiction as a basis for discussions. To this end, we will read creative non-fiction, memoir, and novels. Assignments for this course will include formal analytical essays, creative work (published online), and oral presentations.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Media, Sports, & Identity
In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002)

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Narratives on Rivers, Nature, and Ecology
In this course we will travel to Acadia National Park in Maine for several days for place-based experiential learning and writing. The remaining time will be spent on campus in Middlebury. We will practice non-fiction story telling with a focus on narrative essay-writing about rivers and water as places that are ecologically, emotionally, imaginatively, and spiritually significant.  We will also explore other forms of narratives, including story-telling through combination of image and word. Students should be prepared to travel off-campus for four days and three-nights and to spend time outdoors traipsing through woods along rivers and streams. Travel costs are covered. Registration is by approval only from the instructor. Questions about travel and financial or time implications of missed work or practice should also be directed to the instructor, Prof. Matthew Dickerson. (Approval Only)

Terms Taught

Winter 2019

Requirements

CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect

Terms Taught

Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Narratives in News Media
In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Cultural Rhetorics
In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing: A Practicum Course
This course will prepare students to work with writers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines and to develop their own writing practices and habits. We will learn about composition theory and writing pedagogy, tutoring strategies, and current topics in writing center studies, such as linguistic justice, anti-racism, wellness and care, and inclusion. After completing ethics training, we will conduct ethnographic research using the Middlebury Writing Center as our research site. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be invited to work as paid tutors in the Writing Center. In addition to Writing Center activities, students will complete a semester-long research project that positively impacts the Middlebury Writing Center. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Feminist Blogging
Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, CMP, CW, LIT, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Reporting and Writing the News
Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and op-eds. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline for our class blog, which will cover the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily, and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the evolution of digital and social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

CW

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing Race and Class
In this course we will take a literary and intersectional approach to topics of race and class. Readings include stories, essays, poems and videos by writers such as James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldúa and Kelly Tsai. Students will respond to critical and creative writing prompts, conduct fieldwork, and design two writing projects of their own. The class format will include conversations with guest writers, writing workshops, contemplative activities, and individual conferences with the instructor. Students will preferably have prior experience in discussing issues of race and class, although introductory theories will be made available to provide frameworks for discussion.

Terms Taught

Winter 2020, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

Requirements

CW, LIT, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, through a transnational lense. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Spring 2020

Requirements

CMP, CW, LIT, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Documentary Rhetorics
In this course students will explore the rhetorical performances of documentary film—in terms of production, ethics, and editing—and how documentaries are used for different means: investigation, activism, and even propaganda. After watching contemporary documentaries and reading reviews, interviews, analyses, and theories of filmmaking, students will analyze specific films (with cultural rhetorics and social consciousness lenses), conduct and transcribe interviews, and write a code of ethics for documentary filmmakers. The final project has students either produce or storyboard their own short documentaries.

Terms Taught

Fall 2022

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing On Contemporary Issues: Writing, Editing, and Publishing Online
This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience. Students will create both critical and personal essays that feature strong ideas and perspectives. The readings and writing will focus on American popular culture, broadly defined. Essays will critically engage elements of contemporary American popular culture via a vivid personal voice and presence. Readings will address current issues in popular culture – Gladwell, “Brain Candy,” Klosterman, “Campus Confidential,” for instance. ReMix: Reading in Contemporary Culture is the central text. The end result will be a new online magazine of writings on American popular culture 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Fall 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, ART, CW, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society
The reading and online writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives for a new online magazine on American popular culture. This magazine will have been created by students in Writing on Contemporary Issues. Narratives about self and society will therefore lean towards aspects of American popular culture. 3 hrs sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2021, Spring 2022

Requirements

AMR, CW, LIT, NOR, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Rhetoric of Public Memory
This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect.

Terms Taught

Spring 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2023

Requirements

AMR, CW, HIS, SOC

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Science Writing for the Public
This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers and for online publication. Students will publish in our online magazine (constructed Spring 2017). In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. Students will also learn to manipulate images and how to use digital storytelling. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert; we will also read from The Best Science and Nature Writing (Amy Stewart, ed, 2016). 3 hrs. Sem.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019

Requirements

AMR, CW, LIT, NOR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Healing Through Writing
In this writing-intensive course we will examine how the writing process can serve as a healing tool for adversity and trauma. Using Louise De Salvo’s Writing as a Way of Healing as our theoretical base, we will analyze poems, essays, and book excerpts that demonstrate the transformative power of personal narrative. Students will write and revise their own personal narratives in a workshop setting.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019

Requirements

CW, LIT, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

Your Voice Matters: Opinion Writing for Maximum Impact
Students in this course will learn to write a variety of persuasive opinion pieces, including op-eds, critical reviews, reported personal essays, and letters. We will work on developing critical thinking, research skills, and fact-based arguments, as well as lively, eloquent, and sensitive prose. We will read a wide range of exemplary op-eds and columns and examine how opinion writing shapes social change. Students will be encouraged to publish their work for public consumption on campus or beyond. Because this course may address issues that students find difficult, upsetting, or offensive, those who enroll must have an open mind and a willingness to engage with opposing viewpoints.

Terms Taught

Winter 2019, Winter 2020

Requirements

CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog

Course Description

The Art and Science of the Interview
Interviews are everywhere, from celebrity “freak-outs” to NPR’s StoryCorps to applying to your first job. We will use rhetorical and generic approaches to better understand the purpose and structure of the interview as it arises in different public and professional contexts. We will learn how to become better and more ethical interviewers, and we will conduct interviews on subjects that interest us. Along the way, we will write and reflect on the ethics, purposes, techniques, and psychosocial effects of interviewing. This course prepares students for the social-cultural and contextual nuances of conducting academic, activist, and personal interviews. This course is part of the Public Humanities Labs Initiative administered by the Axinn Center for the Humanities.*

Terms Taught

Winter 2022

Requirements

CW, WTR

View in Course Catalog