Introductory Writing and Rhetoric Program Courses

Courses offered in the past four years. Courses offered currently are as noted.

Course Description

Writing and Power
Power: who has it, who doesn’t, and what does it have to do with your writing? This course both instructs students in how to access power in academic contexts and to critique power structures. We’ll learn how power connects to literacy, and how it's shaped through rhetorical contexts. Students will explore their own power as writers and thinkers while engaging in meaningful personal, reflective and argumentative writing. The professor will work with each student extensively on their writing process and development, and we'll create a writing community. This course bears elective credit but does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect/disc

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022

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Course Description

A Writing in Academic Contexts II
Students in this class will continue building upon their identities as writers and thinkers, while engaging a complex, interdisciplinary theme, within a diverse and supportive classroom community. Class activities and assignments will focus on building rhetorical awareness, analyzing texts from a variety of sources, and conducting library research. Students will explore their voices and perspectives in class discussion and throughout all phases of the writing process, including planning, peer review, and revision. Each student will meet frequently with the instructor, and will have opportunities for growth in oral communication as well. This course does not fulfill the college writing requirement. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

Terms Taught

Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Spring 2022, Spring 2023

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Course Description

English Language in Global Context
In this course we will discuss and write about the dominance of English in the global landscape. Course readings and films offer an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. We will begin the course with a geographic and historical overview of World Englishes and then will examine the impact of English language dominance on individuals and societies, emphasizing themes such as migration, globalization, education, and identity. Throughout the course, we will explore the relevance of these issues to educators, linguists, and policy-makers around the world.

Terms Taught

Spring 2022, Fall 2022

Requirements

CMP, SOC

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