Carly Thomsen

Assistant Professor of Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies

 
 work802.443.5785
 Fall 2017: Wednesdays 8:15-9:45a, Thursdays 11:00a-1:00p, and by appointment.
 Axinn Center at Starr Library 315

 

Courses

Course List: 

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

GSFS 0189 - Intro to Queer Critique      

Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2016, Spring 2017

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GSFS 0269 / AMST 0269 - Beyond Intersectionality      

Beyond Intersectionality: Developing Anti-Racist and Anti-Capitalist Feminisms
Nearly thirty years ago, Kimberlé Crenshaw published the theory of “intersectionality,” in which she argued that racism and sexism collide to make black women’s marginalization distinct from those of both white women and black men (1989). Today, the terms “intersectionality” and “intersectional feminism” are ubiquitous, utilized by scholars, activists, artists, and our students. In this course, we will consider how discourses of and ideas about intersectionality move between and among spaces of dissent. Starting from the position that it is more epistemologically and politically powerful to state that our feminism is anti-racist and anti-capitalist than to say it is “intersectional,” we will address the following questions: What are the benefits and limits of the original theory of intersectionality? How are academic and activist approaches alike both emboldened and limited by intersectionality? What does it mean to be socially and politically conscious, and how do we move from consciousness to action in ways that are not siloed? Texts may include Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women” (1989) and Ange-Marie Hancock’s Intersectionality: An Intellectual History (2016). 3 hrs. lect. AMR NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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GSFS 0289 - Introduction to Queer Critique      

Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Spring 2018

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GSFS 0329 - Politics of Reproduction      

The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect. AMR CMP NOR SOC

Fall 2016, Fall 2017

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GSFS 0430 - Queering Food      

Queering Food: Race, Place, and Social Justice
In this course we will examine food studies, politics, and movements through the lenses of queer, feminist, and critical theory (including work that centralizes gender, class, race, disability, sexuality, and place). In doing so, we will consider dominant and subaltern approaches to food both within the U.S. and transnationally. Throughout, we will explore how critical theory can offer alternative conceptualizations of food politics and justice, as well as how an analysis of food might expand our understandings of embodied subjectivities and the various social structures that produce them. 3 hrs. sem. CMP NOR SOC

Spring 2017

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GSFS 0435 - Feminist Engaged Research      

Feminist Engaged Research
What is feminist engaged research? What are its methods? How does approaching research in a feminist manner influence the kinds of questions we can ask, as well as our potential answers? How has feminist research been useful to activists and how might it continue to be? How have feminists practicing engaged research centered race, place, class, and ability in their analyses of gender and sexuality? This feminist theory/methods hybrid course takes as a starting point these questions. We will think through what feminist engaged research means, develop strategies for conducting such research, and consider the relation of knowledge production to power, justice, and action. Students will grapple with how to apply course material to their own engaged research projects, with the two-fold goal of pushing the boundaries of academic thought and also producing scholarship that is useful beyond academia(GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR NOR SOC

Fall 2017

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GSFS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
(Approval required)

Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

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GSFS 0700 - Senior Essay      

Senior Essay
(Approval required)

Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Spring 2018

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GSFS 0710 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis
(Approval required)

Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018

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Program in Environmental Studies

Franklin Environmental Center at Hillcrest
531 College Street
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05753