Middlebury

 

Michelle McCauley

Professor of Psychology

Email: 
Phone: work802.443.5720
Office Hours: Mondays 4:30-5:15p (FECH 119); Thursdays 10:15a-12:15p (FECH 119)
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Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

ENVS 0500 - Independent Study      

Independent Study
A one- or two-semester research project on a topic that relates to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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ENVS 0700 - ES Senior Honors Work      

Senior Honors Work
The final semester of a multi-semester research project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 only once. (Previous work would have been conducted as one or two semesters of an ENVS 0500 Independent Study project.) The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member, will result in a substantial piece of writing, and will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum. (Senior standing; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0500; Approval only)

Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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NSCI 0500 - Independent Research      

Independent Research
Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

Fall 2011

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PSYC 0202 - Research Methods in Psychology      

Research Methods in Psychology
This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab

CW DED

Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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PSYC 0313 - Legal Psychology      

Legal Psychology
This course will provide an overview of the role of psychological research in the legal system. Students will be asked to consider how psychology is intertwined with legal decisions of guilt, a defendant's competency to stand trial, eyewitness behavior, jury selection, jury decision making, capital punishment, the insanity defense, and other relevant topics. In addition to the text, students will read empirical studies and Supreme Court decisions relevant to the above topics. As psychology's role is contemplated, the strengths and limitations of the empirical research will be evaluated. (PSYC 0105 or PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Spring 2011

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PSYC 0333 / PSYC 0233 - Environmental Psychology      

Environmental Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

SOC

Fall 2010, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

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PSYC 0350 - Directed Research      

Directed Research in Psychology
Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0401 - Environmental Prob. & Behavior      

Environmental Problems and Human Behavior
Eco-psychologists believe there is a synergistic relation between our personal well-being and that of the earth. Viewed through this lens, damaging the eco-system is self-destructive behavior. In this course we will examine: (1) the state of the environment, (2) what motivates people to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (or not), and (3) the extent to which our views of self and happiness relate to our attitudes and beliefs about nature and the environment. In order to examine these issues we will investigate psychology's role in consumerism, community, and pro-environmental behaviors such as recycling. By the end of the semester we should be able to offer, based on the psychological research, suggestions for changes we can make as individuals, and as a society, to help protect the environment. (Any three psychology, neuroscience, or environmental studies courses; open to junior and senior psychology, neuroscience, and environmental studies majors; open to education studies minors by waiver; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2010, Fall 2012

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PSYC 0416 - Environmental Prob. & Behavior      

Environmental Problems and Human Behavior
Eco-psychologists believe there is a synergistic relation between our personal well-being and that of the earth. Viewed through this lens, damaging the eco-system is self-destructive behavior. In this course we will examine: (1) the state of the environment, (2) what motivates people to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (or not), and (3) the extent to which our views of self and happiness relate to our attitudes and beliefs about nature and the environment. In order to examine these issues we will investigate psychology's role in consumerism, community, and pro-environmental behaviors such as recycling. By the end of the semester we should be able to offer, based on the psychological research, suggestions for changes we can make as individuals, and as a society, to help protect the environment. (Any three psychology, neuroscience, or environmental studies courses; open to junior and senior psychology, neuroscience, and environmental studies majors; open to education studies minors by waiver; others by waiver) (Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0401). 3 hrs. sem.

Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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PSYC 0500 - Advanced Research      

Advanced Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0700 - Senior Research      

Senior Research
A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0701 - Senior Thesis Proposal      

Senior Thesis Proposal
Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0702 - Senior Thesis Second Semester      

Senior Thesis Second Semester
Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 0703 - Senior Thesis      

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)

Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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PSYC 1019 - Researching Children's Memory      

Applied Research: Children's Memory
In this applied research class students will be involved in all aspects of data collection for an on-going study involving children’s memory. We will employ different methods of interviewing children as well as methods to code interviews for rapport, accuracy, and other relevant dimensions. We will read and discuss the current research in the field, and collect, code, and discuss our own data. Students will run the stimulus memory sessions, interview child participants, code and enter data, and begin analyzing data from the project. We will spend much of our time off campus interviewing children during the afternoon; however, students will not be required to attend every afternoon session. This course counts as elective credit towards the Psychology major. (Approval required; please contact the instructor)

WTR

Winter 2012

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