Middlebury

 

Cheryl Faraone

Professor of Theatre, Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Std.

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Phone: work802.443.5642
Office Hours: Tuesday 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm & Wednesday 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm & Friday by appt.
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Courses

Courses offered in the past four years.
indicates offered in the current term
indicates offered in the upcoming term[s]

GSFS 0200 - Foundations in GSFS Studies      

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on individual lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

CMP SOC

Spring 2014

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INTD 0206 - Math/Science Contemp. Theatre      

Mathematics and Science as Art in Contemporary Theatre
In Tom Stoppard’s Jumpers, philosopher George Moore employs a list of mathematical arguments to make his case for the existence of a moral God. George’s confused allusions to the paradoxes of Zeno and Bertrand Russell form an interesting backdrop to a host of moral questions that include an astronaut stranded on the moon, the installation of an atheist as Archbishop of Canterbury and the mysterious circumstances surrounding the dead body of George’s debating partner concealed in the next room. This is just one example of how acclaimed playwrights such as Tom Stoppard, Rinne Groff, Michael Frayn, and others have effectively explored mathematical and scientific themes for artistic purposes. Through readings and exercises, and by conducting labs and staging scenes, this class will gain some first-hand insight into the complementary ways in which science and art aim to seek out their respective truths.

DED LIT

Fall 2011, Fall 2013

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THEA 0206 / WAGS 0206 - Contemporary Women Playwrights      

Contemporary Women Playwrights
WAGS/THEA 0206 Contemporary Women Playwrights (Fall 2012)
In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect.

ART LIT

Spring 2010, Fall 2012

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THEA 0208 - Theatre History      

Theatre History
Using the dramatic text as the primary focus, this course will chart the progression of theatre from its ritualistic origins to the advent of modern drama. This survey will include an overview of theatrical architecture, the evolution of design and acting styles, and the introduction of the director. Since theatre does not exist in a void, a consideration of the social, cultural, political, and scientific milieu of each era studied will be included in the course. 2 1/2 hrs. lect./discussion & 1 screening per week

ART CMP EUR HIS

Fall 2012, Fall 2013

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THEA 0210 - Fall Production Studio: Acting      

Fall Production Studio: Acting
The cast works as part of a company interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Productions for Fall 2013 include Vinegar Tom by Caryl Churchill and Pentecost by David Edgar. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held the previous term. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

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THEA 0214 - Directing I: Beginning      

Directing I: Beginning
As a group, students will analyze one or two plays to discover the process involved in preparing a script for production. Attention will be given to production and design concepts, textual values, auditions, rehearsals, and the structuring of a performance in time and space. Students will also cast and direct one or more scenes to be worked on and performed in class. The practical work is combined with written analysis. (Approval required; ARDV 0116, THEA 0102) 4 hrs. lect.

Spring 2011

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THEA 0220 - Spring Production Studio: Act      

Spring Production Studio: Acting
The cast works as part of a company, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing a play. Those receiving credit can expect to rehearse four to six nights a week. Appropriate written work is required. Participation in the course is determined by auditions held during the term prior to the performance. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

ART

Spring 2010, Spring 2012

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THEA 0235 / FYSE 1334 - Theatre and Social Change      

Theatre and Social Change
In this course we will explore ways in which theatre engages perceptions, behaviors, and social conditions in audiences and practitioners. While historically controversial, the practice of art as an agent of change is increasingly important, ignited by the work of Augusto Boal. We will also explore works presented in a 'conventional' theatrical setting, drama therapy, and creative role-playing in institutional settings (prisons, schools, mental health facilities). Community-based work will focus on issues facing a specific community and the voices of that group. We will read theory and history, engage issues, and build work. No previous theatre experience is required. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1334) 3 hrs. lect.

ART CMP SOC

Spring 2011, Spring 2013

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THEA 0237 - Devised Theatre      

Devised Theatre
Devised Theatre is a process of making a theatre piece without beginning with a formal script and is often created to explore social issues. The work may be composed through vocal or physical improvisation, created through interviews, or collaged from various sources. In the course we will both study and experience devised theatre, frequently called collaborative or verbatim theatre. Readings include selections from The Frantic Assembly Book of Devising Theatre, Verbatim Theatre, and the works of Anne Bogart. Students will engage the form’s history, build a shared vocabulary, and create pieces within the class and with outside collaborators, The roles of director, actor, playwright, and designer will be re-examined in light of this process. (THEA 0102 or THEA 0218 or THEA 0235)

ART

Fall 2014

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THEA 0324 - Directing II: Advanced      

Directing II: Advanced
This is a course for the upper level theatre student with previous experience in directing. Students will be exposed to various contemporary performance modes and styles and will devote half the semester to the exploration, rehearsal and performance of a substantive text. Attention will be given to the director/designer collaboration, working with actors, and the pragmatic aspects of mounting a production. This course is required for students hoping to propose independent work in directing, but is open to any student with the appropriate prerequisites. (Approval required; THEA 0214, additional directing experience or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect.

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2013

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THEA 0402 - Acting IV: Styles of Acting      

Acting IV: Styles of Acting
The course will expose students to the rigorous physical, vocal, mental, and emotional demands of "non-naturalistic" acting, beginning with the Greeks, continuing through Shakespeare, Restoration, the eighteenth century, and ending with contemporary absurdist playwrights. Emphasis is first upon an intellectual understanding of the texts, then upon their fullest physical, vocal, and emotional expression. The course is designed for students who have had some prior stage experience. (ARDV 0116, THEA 0102 and an additional performance course) 4 hrs. lect./1hr. screen.

Spring 2010, Spring 2012

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THEA 0406 - 20th/21st Century Perf. Aesth      

Twentieth/Twenty-first Century Performance Aesthetics
This course is an intensive exploration of the evolution of the theory and practice of theatrical experimentation in the 20th and 21st centuries. The Modernist movement irrevocably altered the artist’s relationship to the social, and political order. The ramifications of this change will be addressed throughout the course, with particular emphasis on Brecht, Artaud, and Grotowski. Students will write papers and give presentations on the work of such contemporary artists as Peter Brook, DV8, Robert Wilson, Ariane Mnouchkine, Complicite and Jerzy Grotowski. (Approval required; ARDV 0116 and THEA 0208) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc.

ART

Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2014

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THEA 0500 - Intermediate Indep Project      

Intermediate Independent Project
In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors in design may propose a THEA 0500 Intermediate Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar.

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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THEA 0505 - Intermediate Ind. Project      

Intermediate Independent Project
(Approval Required)

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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THEA 0700 - Senior Project      

Senior Independent Project
Senior work is required. In consultation with their advisors, theatre majors may propose a THEA 0700 Independent Project. Preliminary proposal forms approved by the student's advisor will be submitted to the program by March 1st of the preceding academic year for those wanting credit in the fall or winter terms and by October 1st for those wanting credit in the spring term. Projects will conform to the guidelines that are available in the theatre office. Students are required to attend a weekly THEA 0500/0700 seminar.

Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Winter 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Winter 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Winter 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

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THEA 1018 - The Tour of Pentecost      

Preparing the Tour of Pentecost
In this course we will continue to rehearse and evolve the Fall 2013 production of Pentecost, in preparation for its invited performance at the regional American College Theatre Festival on January 29, 2014. The production will be adapted for a larger stage and auditorium with a differing actor/audience relationship; company members will have an opportunity to re-explore and expand their work in the production and will take on additional assignments related to the touring and production needs of the play. (Approval required)

WTR

Winter 2014

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WAGS 0200 - Foundations in W & G Studies      

Foundations in Women's and Gender Studies
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Examining gender always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which groups have resisted these processes. The course is organized in sections to illuminate the effects of particular social institutions and structures on our gendered lives. Each section will introduce a broad overview of feminist interventions in different fields of inquiry. Cumulatively, the course reveals the importance of gender as an analytical category to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. 3 hrs. lect.

CMP SOC

Spring 2011

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