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Assistant Professor

William Arrocha
Office
Casa Fuente Building CF300H
Tel
(831) 647-4163
Email
warrocha@miis.edu

Professor Arrocha teaches courses on international development, migration and human rights, as well as U.S.-Mexico relations. His latest publication is titled Compassionate Migration and Regional Policy in the Americas (Palgrave Macmillan UK). His research focuses on immigration, development, and human rights. His work has been published in The Journal of Intercultural Disciplines, The California Western Law Review, The Journal for Hate Studies, La Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), The Seton Hall Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations, North Western Journal of International Affairs, Mesoámerica, Libros de FLASCO, and Revista de Relaciones Internacionales, UNAM, México. He appears regularly on UNIVISION and has been a consultant for the Association of Caribbean States (ACS), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), and the governments of Mexico and Canada. He received a U.S. Congressional Certificate of Special Recognition for Outstanding and Invaluable Service to the Community, and a California Legislature Assembly Certificate in Recognition of the 2006 Allen Griffin Award for Post-Secondary Teaching. He is fluent in Spanish and French.

Areas of Interest

Dr. Arrocha is passionate about the struggle for human rights and social justice. He is interested in the interface of migration, human rights, and human security, and explores through his research the causes of oppression and social exclusion. His work is informed by Neo-Gramscianism and applies a critical theory approach to politics and development. In his classes as well as his research, he constantly explores the connections of ideas, institutions and material capabilities as they shape the structures of political, social, and economic power. He considers that social justice cannot occur without a strong civil society that works towards eliminating all forms of social injustice and oppression.