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The Middlebury Institute Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation, Master of Arts in Conference Interpretation, and Master of Arts in Translation are four-semester, 60-credit programs.


Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation

Start Date Credits Thesis and/or Practicum Language Competency
August 60 Optional Required

Requirements

Core course work:

  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight B–A (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight A–B (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation B–A  (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation A–B  (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight B–A (4 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight A–B (2–4 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation I (4 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II (4 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)

Electives (18–21 credits)

Recommended electives:

  • Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) (2 credits)
  • Advanced CAT (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous B-A (2 credits)

Core Course Work

Translation

Learn to provide high-quality translation and independently edit and revise pieces using the latest in computer-assisted translation technologies. You will be introduced to a variety of genres and fields, including politics, economics, science, and technology.

Interpretation

Learn to interpret in both consecutive and simultaneous modes across a variety of genres and fields. You will also learn to work in interpretation booths and gain experience with various technologies used for interpretation in today’s markets.

Tools and Technology

The translation market is constantly adapting to new technologies. Gain experience and familiarity with these technologies and consider the ways in which they will facilitate and affect your professional practice.

Theory

Explore the latest theories in translation research so you are familiar with the current work being done in the field, and consider the impact this has on your own translation work.

Professional Skills

Gain real-world experience by participating in the student-run Fall Forum. You will use your interpretation skills with a live audience. You’ll also participate in Translation and Interpretation as a Profession, a career-focused course that helps prepare you for the markets in which you may work. In conjunction with this course, your career and academic advisor will provide information and guidance regarding your career goals.

Electives

You will complete your degree with electives of your choice. You can take literary translation, CAT courses, pursue further interpretation course work, build your confidence in public speaking, or take general courses from other programs to build on your expertise.

Advanced Entry

We offer a 30-credit, two-semester Translation and Interpretation program to students who have substantial prior course work in translation and interpretation as well as professional experience in the field; visit How to Apply for more information.

Course work:

  • Advanced Translation I (4 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II (4 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)
  • Electives (10–11 credits)

Translation and Interpretation Sample Course Schedule

Fall Start, Full Time, Four Semesters

Fall 1 16 Credits
Introduction to Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Introduction to Interpretation (B–A, A–B) 4
Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Electives 2
Spring 1 16 Credits
Intermediate Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Intermediate Interpretation—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Intermediate Interpretation—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Advanced Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Fall 2 14 Credits
Advanced Translation I (A–B, B–A) 4
Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Advanced Interpretation I—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Electives 4
Spring 2 16 Credits
Advanced Translation II (A–B, B–A) 4
Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Advanced Interpretation II—Simultaneous (B–A) 2
Translation and Interpretation as a Profession 2
Electives 2
TOTAL 60

Master of Arts in Conference Interpretation

Start Date Credits Practicum Language Competency
August 60 Required Required

Requirements

Core course work:

  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight B–A (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight A–B (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation B–A (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation A–B (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight B–A (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight A–B (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Simultaneous B–A (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation Simultaneous A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)

Electives (14–15 credits)

Recommended electives:

  • Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) (2 credits)

Practicum in Interpretation (4 credits total: 2 credits per semester)

Three Language Additional Requirements

If you are also pursuing a C language, the following courses are also required:

  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight C–English (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation C–English (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight C–English (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation—Consecutive C–English (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Interpretation—Simultaneous C–English (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Simultaneous C–English (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive C–English (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Simultaneous C–English (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive C–English (2 credits)

Core Course Work

Translation

During your first year, you will explore translation skills, to build both your language awareness and terminology in your A and B languages.

Interpretation

Work in and out of both your A and B languages in consecutive and simultaneous environments. Explore a variety of genres and fields, including politics, economics, science, and technology. Learn to work in interpretation booths and gain experience with various technologies used for interpretation in today’s markets.

Tools and Technology

The translation market is constantly adapting to new technologies. Gain experience and familiarity with these technologies and consider the ways in which they will facilitate and affect your professional practice.

Theory

Explore the latest theories in translation research so you are familiar with the current work being done in the field and consider the impact this has on your own translation work.

Professional Skills

Participate in Translation and Interpretation as a Profession, a career-focused course that helps prepare you for the markets in which you may work. In conjunction with this course, your career and academic advisor will provide information and guidance regarding your career goals.

Electives

You will complete your degree with electives of your choice. You can explore the Mindfulness for Interpreters course, pursue further translation course work, build your confidence in public speaking, or take general courses from other programs to build on your expertise.

Practicum

Gain real-world experience by completing a two-semester interpretation practicum in which you will provide simultaneous and consecutive interpretation services in public venues, including conferences and even some of the Institute’s multilingual interdisciplinary courses.

Advanced Entry

We offer a 30-credit, two-semester Conference Interpretation program to students who have substantial prior course work in translation and interpretation as well as professional experience in the field; visit How to Apply for more information.

Course work:

  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation Simultaneous A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive A–B (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous B–A (2 credits)
  • Advanced Interpretation II Simultaneous A–B (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)
  • Practicum in Interpretation (4 credits total: 2 credits per semester)
  • Electives (8–9 credits)

Conference Interpretation Sample Course Schedule

Fall Start, Full Time, Four Semesters

Fall 1 16 Credits
Introduction to Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Introduction to Interpretation (B–A, A–B) 4
Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Electives 2
Spring 1 16 Credits
Intermediate Translation (B–A, A–B) 4
Intermediate Interpretation—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Intermediate Interpretation—Simultaneous (B–A, A–B) 4
Advanced Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Electives 2
Fall 2 14 Credits
Advanced Interpretation I—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Advanced Interpretation I—Simultaneous (B–A, A–B) 4
Practicum in Interpretation 2
Electives 4
Spring 2 14 Credits
Advanced Interpretation II—Consecutive (B–A, A–B) 4
Advanced Interpretation II—Simultaneous (B–A, A–B) 4
Practicum in Interpretation 2
Translation and Interpretation as a Profession 2
Electives 2
TOTAL 60

Master of Arts in Translation

Start Date Credits Practicum Language Competency
August 60 Required (thesis option) Required

Requirements

Core course work:

  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight B–A (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight A–B (4 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation B–A (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Interpretation A–B (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) (2 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight B–A (4 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation Written/Sight A–B (4 credits)
  • Advanced CAT (2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation I B–A (4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation I A–B (2–4 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II B–A (4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II A–B (2–4 credits)

Electives (14–19 credits)

  • Directed Study: Thesis (optional, 4 credits: 2 credits per semester)

Translation Practicum (4 credits total: 2 credits per semester)

Three Language Additional Requirements

If you are also pursuing a C language, the following courses are also required:

  • Introduction to Translation Written/Sight C–English (2–4 credits)
  • Intermediate Translation C–English (2–4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation I C–English (2–4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II C–English (2–4 credits)

Core Course Work

Translation

Learn to provide high-quality translation and independently edit and revise pieces using the latest in computer-assisted translation technologies. You will be introduced to a variety of genres and fields, including politics, economics, science, and technology.

Interpretation

During your first semester, you can try interpretation courses to see if your skills and interests are compatible with those of interpreters.

Tools and Technology

The translation market is constantly adapting to new technologies. Gain experience and familiarity with these technologies and consider the ways in which they will facilitate and affect your professional practice.

Theory

Explore the latest theories in translation research so you are familiar with the current work being done in the field and consider the impact this has on your own translation work.

Professional Skills

Participate in Translation and Interpretation as a Profession, a career-focused course that helps prepare you for the markets in which you may work. In conjunction with this course, your career and academic advisor will provide information and guidance regarding your career goals.

Electives

You will complete your degree with electives of your choice. You can take literary translation, pursue further interpretation course work, learn more about project management, or take general courses from other programs to build on your expertise.

Practicum

Gain real-world experience by completing a two-semester translation practicum, in which you experiment with your individual translator styles and explore the complexities of working with others on large-scale projects

Advanced Entry

We offer a 30-credit, two-semester Translation program to students who have substantial prior course work in translation and interpretation as well as professional experience in the field; visit How to Apply for more information.

Course work:

  • Advanced Translation I B–A (4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation I A–B (2–4 credits)
  • Translation Practicum (2 credits)
  • Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) (2 credits)
  • Translation and Interpretation as a Profession (1–2 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II B–A (4 credits)
  • Advanced Translation II A–B (2–4 credits)
  • Advanced CAT (2 credits)
  • Translation Practicum (4 credits total: 2 credits per semester)
  • Electives (2–7 credits)
    • Directed Study: Thesis (optional, 4 credits: 2 credits per semester)

Translation Sample Course Schedule

Fall Start, Full Time, Four Semesters

Term Course Credits
Fall 1 Introduction to Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Fall 1 Introduction to Interpretation (B–A, A–B) 4
Fall 1 Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Spring 1 Intermediate Translation (B–A, A–B) 8
Spring 1 Advanced Computer-Assisted Translation 2
Spring 1 Electives 4
Fall 2 Advanced Translation I (A–B, B–A) 8
Fall 2 Translation Practicum 2
Fall 2 Electives 6
Spring 2 Advanced Translation II (A–B, B–A) 8
Spring 2 Translation Practicum 2
Spring 2 Translation and Interpretation as a Profession 2
Spring 2 Electives 4
TOTAL   60

Specializations

Localization Management Specialization

This 14-credit specialization in Localization Management allows students in our translation, translation and interpretation, and conference interpretation degree programs to be more competitive in the industry. This specialization incurs additional costs. Courses:

  • Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation (2 credits)

  • Website Localization (2 credits)

  • Advanced Computer-Assisted Translation (2 credits)

  • Multilingual Desktop Publishing and A/V Localization (2 credits)

  • Localization Project Management (2 credits)

  • Software and Games Localization (2 credits)

  • Localization elective (2 credits)

Intercultural Competence

The Intercultural Competence (ICC) specialization equips students with the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes to expertly lead and train multicultural teams, sensitively interact with diverse stakeholders, and create effective ICC assessments and training materials. Students interested in communication, social and environmental justice, and facilitation skills should consider this specialization.

Internships

Many students take on summer internships to apply their developing skills. Because of the Institute’s reputation, students have access to professional opportunities at many international organizations, such as the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the U.S. Department of State, and the National Security Agency, as well as at software companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, international corporations and law firms, and translation agencies. These professional opportunities often lead to full-time and freelance work upon graduation.